Gay marriage activists raise $13 million for ballot battles

By Robert Tanner

The 2004 election campaigns that ultimately banned same-sex marriages in 13 states were funded by a mix of national groups, churches and individuals, with ban supporters narrowly outraising opponents and total contributions breaking $13 million, according to a new analysis of state-level fundraising.

Supporters of the state constitutional amendments raised $6.8 million for ballot committees; opponents raised $6.5 million, according to the study by The Institute on Money in State Politics, a nonpartisan research organization in Helena, Mont. The single largest block of givers were advocates of gay and lesbian rights, donating more than $3 million.

Conservative organizations affiliated with a network called the Arlington Group gave nearly $2 million, the report found. Churches also invested heavily, contributing $1.9 million, overwhelmingly in favor of bans on same-sex marriage.

Despite the nearly even split of the $13.3 million raised by ballot committees, the amendments passed overwhelmingly, sometimes by as much as a 3-to-1 ratio. The closest vote, in Oregon, passed with 57 percent in favor of a ban and 43 percent against.

The two sides together spent more than $2 million in each of several battleground states, including Michigan, Oregon and Ohio. But much less went into campaigns elsewhere, with under $100,000 spent in a half-dozen states, and less than $10,000 total in Mississippi and North Dakota.

The fight over gay marriages isn’t over. Texas voters in November approved a constitutional ban on same-sex marriage, though Maine voters rejected a conservative push to repeal a new law that outlawed discrimination based on sexual orientation.

Efforts have begun to put same-sex bans before voters in at least seven more states, according to the report. “There was a coordinated effort to bring this issue to the ballot in a number of states,” said research director Sue O’Connell.

Conservative groups affiliated with the Arlington Group included Focus on the Family and the Family Research Council, whose leaders had been outspoken against gay and lesbian marriages after Massachusetts’ high court found that the state constitution allowed same-sex marriages.

Among the big-spending advocates of gay and lesbian rights were the Human Rights Campaign and the National Gay & Lesbian Task Force.
In all, 19 states have passed constitutional amendments outlawing same-sex marriage. Only one state Connecticut has enacted a law legalizing civil unions without a court order.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition of January 27, 2006.

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4 candidates vie for presiding bishop of Episcopalian church

By Richard N. Ostling

Only 1 of 4 bishops in running voted against approving church’s first openly-gay bishop in General Convention elections last summer



Frank Griswold

NEW YORK The Episcopal Church named a slate of four candidates Wednesday to be its new leader, a group that includes the first female nominee for the post and one candidate who opposed the consecration of the denomination’s first openly gay bishop.

The candidates for presiding bishop are Bishops Katharine Jefferts Schori of Las Vegas; J. Neil Alexander of Atlanta; Edwin (Ted) Gulick Jr. of Louisville, Ky.; and Henry N. Parsley Jr. of Birmingham, Ala.

The new presiding bishop, who succeeds the retiring Frank Griswold, is scheduled to be elected June 18 during the church’s General Convention for a term extending to 2015.

Parsley is the only nominee who voted against approval of V. Gene Robinson to be New Hampshire’s bishop at the 2003 General Convention.

However, none of the nominees participated in the consecration ritual that made Robinson a bishop.

Robinson’s elevation has provoked ongoing protest from the denomination’s conservative wing. It has also created discord within the global Anglican Communion of which the Episcopal Church is a member and some churches, particularly in Africa, have broken ties with the Americans and denounced Griswold for leading the consecration.

The U.S. presiding bishop serves as a member of Anglicanism’s world body of 38 “primates.”

Integrity, the Episcopal gay caucus, said its members “commend the work” of the nominating committee and look for the next presiding bishop to continue efforts toward “full inclusion.”

But the slate drew immediate criticism from traditionalists.

Bishop Robert Duncan of Pittsburgh, moderator of the conservative Anglican Communion Network, said the election won’t matter unless the winner leads “the Episcopal Church back into the Christian mainstream, something that given the past records of these candidates seems unlikely.”

The American Anglican Council said the list “makes a strong statement” by including no one “representative of orthodox Anglicanism” who would resist gay clergy and blessings of same-sex unions.

The council said that although Parsley voted against Robinson, his actions in Alabama “belie his claims of orthodoxy.” Canon Kendall Harmon of South Carolina, who edits a closely watched Internet blog, agreed that Parsley is “unsupportive of orthodox members of his own diocese.”

Alexander, 52, a former seminary professor, served on the delegation that explained Episcopal policies on sexuality to an international Anglican council last year. He depicted his own changing views on sexual morals in a 2003 book.

Gulick, 57, is co-chairman of the Catholic-Anglican dialogue in the United States and serves on an international Roman Catholic-Anglican unity commission. At the 2000 General Convention he served on the floor committee that treated sexual issues.

Jefferts Schori, 51, serves on a special commission treating relations with world Anglicans. Her Nevada diocese is one of the church’s smallest (35 congregations, 6,000 members).

Parsley, 57, chairs the U.S. bishops’ theology committee and serves on the bishops’ planning committee. He is also chancellor of the University of the South.
Additional nominees can be proposed until April 1, but it’s expected the nation’s bishops will choose among names proposed by the official nominating committee. The winner of the bishops’ balloting must then be confirmed by clergy and lay delegates.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition of January 27, 2006.

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National Briefs

By Staff and Wire Reorts

Gay rights law supporters rally on state Capitol steps in Washington

More than 1,000 gay rights supporters rallied on the Capitol steps, calling for passage of a gay civil rights law bill that appears to have sufficient support this year after nearly 30 years of failure in the state Legislature.

Wearing “I’m for Equality” buttons and carrying signs that read “Equality for All of God’s Children,” supporters listened Monday to lawmakers and religious leaders who support the measure that would add “sexual orientation” to a state law that bans discrimination in housing, employment and insurance. Sixteen states have passed similar laws.

“We are on the brink of doing something truly remarkable,” Governor Chris Gregoire told the cheering crowd. “Finally, after far too many years, the state is going to take a stand to say that gay and lesbian individuals living in our great state have the right to be valued and considered to be as worthy as any other citizen.”

The measure passed the House last week and its passage in the Senate is expected soon.

Virginia Legislature approves ballot measure banning gay marriage

The Virginia Senate gave final approval Wednesday to a proposed constitutional amendment banning same-sex marriage.

The approval came despite warnings from opponents who claim it is so broadly worded that it could have unintended consequences for all unmarried couples. The House of Delegates had already approved an identical measure.

The measure will be placed before Virginia voters in the November general election.

Virginia law defines marriage as the union of one man and one woman. But Senator Stephen Newman, a Republican, said a constitutional amendment is necessary to strengthen the state’s position if federal courts try to force the state to recognize same-sex marriages or civil unions performed elsewhere.

Senator John Edwards, a Democrat, argued that the amendment is so sweeping that it could undermine contracts affecting unmarried people, including straight couples. Among the examples he cited were insurance, powers of attorney and joint ownership of property.

Indiana Legislature tables amendment to overturn gay rights ordinances

A proposed amendment that would have overturned gay rights ordinances in Indianapolis and other cities has been withdrawn by its author.

Representative Jeff Thompson, a Republican, withdrew the controversial measure Wednesday. He had tried to insert it into a bill on emminent domain. House Speaker Brian C. Bosma, also a Republican, adjourned the House on Tuesday to prevent a vote on the measure.

Bosma said the matter needed to be more thoroughly examined by a legislative committee with the public given an opportunity to provide input on the idea.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition of January 27, 2006.

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World Briefs

By Rex Wockner

Australia tries to stop citizens from marrying overseas
Australia’s government is trying to stop its citizens who live overseas from entering same-sex marriages in countries that allow them, The Age newspaper reported on Jan. 14.
The Australian government is interferring with those wedding plans by refusing to provide written proof to the other nation that the Australian in question is free to marry, the newspaper said.
In one case, Peter Kakucska, an Australian living in Vienna who wanted to marry his Austrian partner in the Netherlands, where same-sex marriage is allowed, was given stamped certifications of the anti-gay policies by Australia’s Austrian embassy.
One certification said: “Following the advice of the Australian Attorney-General’s Department we herewith certify that Australian law does not allow the issue of a Certificate of No Impediment to Marriage to persons wishing to enter into a same-sex marriage.”
A second document refused to confirm that Kakucska was single.
The Netherlands ultimately let the couple marry anyway, when presented with the Australian refusals and Kakucska’s affidavit that he was single.
Gay activist Rodney Croome of the Australian Coalition for Equality called the government’s actions “mean-spirited and bloody-minded.”

Euro Parliament demands clampdown on homophobia in member states
The European Parliament passed a resolution on Jan. 17 demanding that its 25 member states clamp down on homophobia, protect GLBT people from discrimination and extend them full equal rights.
The vote was 468 to 149 with 41 abstentions.
The resolution was aimed in particular at nations such as Poland, Latvia, Lithuania and Romania where governments, religious leaders and anti-gay organizations have stepped up oppression of the gay community in recent years.
The document cited “a series of worrying events … in a number of EU member states … ranging from banning gay pride or equality marches to the use by leading politicians and religious leaders of inflammatory or threatening language or hate speech, failure by police to provide adequate protection or even breaking up peaceful demonstrations, violent demonstrations by homophobic groups, and the introduction of changes to constitutions explicitly to prohibit same-sex unions.”
The parliamentarians urged the European Commission “to ensure that all member states … are correctly implementing Directive 2000/78/EC (establishing a general framework for equal treatment in employment and occupation) and to start infringement proceedings against those member states that fail to do so.”
They also told the commission “to consider the use of criminal penalties in cases of violation” of directives based on Article 13 of the European Community Treaty, which empowers the Council of the European Union to ban discrimination based on sexual orientation and other factors.
In a press release coinciding with the parliamentary debate, the European branch of the International Lesbian and Gay Association stated: “Last year the European Union witnessed the most appalling manifestations of homophobia and discrimination against LGBT people. Peaceful LGBT marches promoting equality and tolerance were banned or hindered by authorities in Poland, Latvia and Romania. Appallingly extreme and hateful statements humiliating, ridiculing and discriminating against LGBT people came out from some senior politicians and religious leaders in Poland and Latvia.
“Poland closed the nation’s equality body, which dealt with various forms of discrimination including on the grounds of sexual orientation,” the group continued. “Latvia remains the only EU member state which, despite the requirement of the EU Employment Equality Directive, did not explicitly ban sexual orientation discrimination in employment and has now amended its constitution to ban same-sex marriage. A similar proposal is being debated in Lithuania.”

Case against student who called
policeman’s horse gay is dismissed
A college student in Oxford, England, who was arrested for calling a policeman’s horse “gay” saw his case dismissed by the Oxford Magistrates’ Court on Jan. 12.
The court cited a lack of evidence that Sam Brown’s remark violated the Public Order Act, which prohibits homophobic statements that are “likely to cause harassment, alarm or distress.”
Brown, 21, had said to a mounted policeman, “Excuse me, do you realize your horse is gay?”
He was hauled off to jail for the night and later taken to court for refusing to pay a $140 fine.

Few couples taking advantage of Tasmania’s relationships register
Only 58 couples have taken advantage of the relationships register in the Australian state of Tasmania during its two years of existence, The
Mercury newspaper reported on Jan. 16.
Forty-three couples registered in 2003 and 15 in 2004. Forty-six were same-sex couples and 12 opposite-sex. Of the same-sex couples, 24 are male and 22 are female.
Tasmanian Gay and Lesbian Rights Group spokesman Rodney Croome blamed the slow move by couples to register on the government, saying it has failed to promote the register.
The register also is available to nonsexual partnerships, such as when one person is a caregiver to another. It grants spousal rights in areas such as pensions, taxes, insurance, health care, hospital visitation, wills, property, parenting and bereavement leave.
Tasmania has a population of 484,700.

Churches in Czechoslavakia publish
letter opposing partnership bill
Ten religious denominations published a letter on the Czech Bishops Conference Web site Jan. 16 urging Parliament and President Vaclav Klaus to reject a same-sex partnership bill that has passed the lower house and awaits consideration in the Senate.
The letter said such a law would “weaken family life” and “cause chaos in values.”
It was signed by Czech officials of the Roman Catholic Church, Orthodox Church and eight Protestant churches.
Observers believe the bill is unlikely to pass in the Senate anyway.
Andalusia favorite location for same-sex couples getting married in Spain
Since Spain legalized same-sex marriage last June, 55 percent of same-sex marriages there have occurred in Andalusia, where Seville is located.
Of the 425 same-sex marriages recorded by the Justice Ministry, 235 took place in the southern region, according to the Andalusian COLEGAS Federation of Lesbians, Gays, Bisexuals and Transsexuals.
The group called Andalusia “a land of tolerance and coexistence.”

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition of January 27, 2006.

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U.S. halts international study on drug-conserving therapy

By Laurann Neergarrd

Early results showed that participants who took their medicine only when their immune systems waned got sicker, died more quickly



Jose Zuniga

WASHINGTON A major international study of a drug-conserving AIDS therapy has been halted because patients trying the on-again, off-again strategy got sicker than those who never took a break from the high-powered drugs, U.S. researchers announced Jan. 18.

The study had enrolled more than 5,000 HIV patients in 33 countries before it was abruptly stopped by the U.S. government’s National Institutes of Health after a routine safety analysis.

Researchers concluded that those who took their medicine only when their immune systems waned were more than twice as likely to get sicker or die as

Dr. Sandra Lehrman

people who took the drugs every day.

The finding is a blow to AIDS advocates who had hoped that drug-conserving therapy would reduce side effects and save money on the expensive medications, particularly in the world’s poorest countries, where AIDS is skyrocketing.

“All around, it’s disappointing news,” said Jose Zuniga, president of the International Association of Physicians in AIDS Care.

He cautioned that the idea of drug-conserving therapy shouldn’t be shelved permanently: It might work one day, when there are newer, even more potent anti-HIV medicines to choose from.

“It should signal us to invest even more in developing the next generation of anti-retroviral drugs that may make this a possibility,” Zuniga said.

Combinations of potent anti-HIV drugs help patients live longer, and slow their progression from HIV infection to full-blown AIDS. But the combinations can cause serious side effects; it’s inconvenient to take numerous pills a day, and the drugs are expensive.

While treatment guidelines back continuous therapy, earlier small studies had suggested it might be possible to take medication breaks and still control the virus while reducing side effects and cutting costs. So the NIH funded a bigger study one of the largest ever done with HIV therapies to see if those early results were real.

Called the SMART trial, for Strategies for Management of Anti-Retroviral Therapy, volunteers were randomly assigned to take their medicine continuously or only when key immune cells called CD4s dropped to a certain level.

Not only did that strategy not control the HIV virus, but there actually was an increase in side effects affecting the heart, kidney and liver in patients taking the drugs only episodically, NIH said.

The side-effect increase was counterintuitive, and researchers so far can’t explain it, said Dr. Sandra Lehrman of NIH’s AIDS division.

NIH officials last week notified doctors participating in the study to begin contacting their patients about the results, and to recommend full-time dosing for everyone who had taken intermittent therapy.

For such a large international study to so quickly find an answer the first patients were enrolled in 2002 is important, Lehrman stressed.

“This large international study showed the benefit of the viral suppression strategy,” she said. The main message for HIV patients is if you’re taking the drug cocktails, “it does not appear prudent to get off them.”

Beyond the question of treatment breaks, the study also gathered a multitude of data on such questions as risk factors for side effects and HIV progression, information to be unveiled in upcoming medical journals and meetings.

Study sites included the United States and Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Britain, Canada, Chile, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Morocco, New Zealand, Norway, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Russia, South Africa, Spain, Switzerland, Thailand and Uruguay.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition of January 27, 2006.

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Medical marijuana on N.M. agenda

By Associated Press

SANTA FE, N.M. New Mexico Governor Bill Richardson has put medical marijuana legislation on the agenda for lawmakers to debate in coming weeks.

“This issue is too important and there are too many New Mexicans suffering to delay this issue any further,” Richardson said Wednesday.

The proposed legislation would allow patients seriously ill with cancer, AIDS or certain other illnesses legal access to marijuana. Patients would be recommended by their doctors to a program overseen by the state Department of Health.

A similar measure passed the state Senate last year but never reached a vote in the House. Federal law prohibits any use of marijuana, but 11 states allow it be grown and used for medicinal purposes.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition of January 27, 2006.

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Most new AIDS cases in Hawaii are among men

By Associated Press

HONOLULU A state health official said he’s disappointed that the number of new AIDS cases in Hawaii hasn’t fallen over the past six years.

There were 109 new AIDS cases in the state last year, which is also average for the past six years.

Of the cases last year, 58 were reported on Oahu, 18 in Maui County, 12 on the Big Island and 21 on Kauai.

“We would think by now we would be seeing fewer cases since treatment has been available for some time,” said Peter Whiticar, head of the Health Department’s STD/AIDS Prevention Branch.

Of the new AIDS cases, 89 percent were male. Male-to-male sex remains the most common risk factor, cited in 62 percent of the cases.

More than half, 58 percent, were Caucasian with Asians accounting for 12 percent and Hawaiians-Pacific Islands 8 percent.

There are an estimated 2,300 to 3,200 infected residents with human immunodeficiency virus, which causes AIDS, in the state. Of that total, 1,305 people with AIDS were known to be living in Hawaii.

Whiticar said the new cases are people who were HIV-positive for years and developed significantly weakened immune systems or any of an assortment of ailments symptomatic of AIDS.

Since 1983, 2,847 AIDS cases have been reported in Hawaii, with 1,542 known dead from the disease.

Whiticar said with effective treatments and news of HIV-AIDS largely focused on problems in the Third World, some Americans have become complacent about avoiding unsafe sexual behavior.

If these people don’t get tested or develop symptoms later, it could be years before a corresponding increase in HIV-AIDS cases is noted, he said.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition of January 27, 2006.

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Botswana’s new plan for HIV testing draws praise, criticism

By Alexandra Zavis

Proponents hope new system encourages more people to get tested,
but critics cite concerns over personal privacy

GABORONE, Botswana When Botswana first offered free AIDS treatment, health authorities in one of the world’s most infected countries braced for a rush of patients. It didn’t happen.

It turned out that most people were so afraid of the deadly disease, and the frequent social ostracism, that they didn’t want to know if they were infected.
That reluctance to seek help in one of the few African nations able to provide it prompted a radical rethinking of how testing is done here. Now, HIV tests are offered as a part of any medical visit.

In most places, patients are left to ask for a test themselves, then put through extensive counseling to prepare them in case they are infected. But despite decades of education campaigns, the World Health Organization estimates less than 10 percent of infected people in the African countries at the epicenter of the AIDS pandemic realize they have the virus.

Botswana’s decision to start routine testing initially caused alarm among international health advocates, who worried that patients’ rights to confidentiality and informed consent would be compromised.

“I think the first right of a human being is to be alive. All other rights are secondary,” counters Segolame Ramotlhwa, operations manager for the national treatment program known as Masa, or New Dawn.

He argues that confidentiality was being confused with secrecy, making doctors reluctant to even suggest testing for a disease that has infected more than a third of Botswana’s adults.

Doctors here believe pulling patients aside for special counseling is intimidating and helps fuel the stigma that keeps patients from seeking help.

“In fact, we found that people who had not made their minds up quite often were definitely against it once the pretest counseling was done,” said Dr. Howard Moffat, medical superintendent at Princess Marina Hospital in the capital, Gaborone.

“I think the medical profession itself … played a major role in creating this fear of AIDS and this quite irrational reluctance to be tested,” Moffat said.
Since the beginning of 2004, Botswana has treated HIV tests like any other medical procedure. Patients have the option to refuse, but doctors say most don’t. They estimate up to 35 percent of the country’s 1.7 million people now know their status.

If the test proves negative for infection, a health worker delivers a brief message on the importance of staying that way. If the test is positive, the patient gets help to manage the condition and treatment when needed.

Most people see a doctor only after their symptoms become severe, by which time it may be too late. It takes three to four times more resources to save someone who arrives on a stretcher than someone who is still on their feet, Ramotlhwa said.

When Kelatlhilwe Segole was pregnant, she was not offered an HIV test and unwittingly passed the virus to her 7-year-old daughter. Both are now in treatment, but her husband refused to be tested until he was in a wheelchair.

“I kept telling him, he will die because of not knowing his status,” Segole, a fragile-looking 27-year-old, said as she waited in a daylong line for her medicine.

WHO and UNAIDS now endorse routine testing in all HIV-prevalent areas where AIDS drug “cocktails” are available.

Much of the emphasis on voluntary testing and counseling came from AIDS’ early association in the United States with gays. That gave the disease an added taint in Africa, where homosexuality is widely taboo. But AIDS is overwhelmingly a heterosexual disease in Africa, home to more than 60 percent of the world’s estimated 40 million infected.

Life-prolonging medicines that have turned HIV into a manageable chronic condition in wealthier countries remain out of reach for all but a handful on this continent. The drugs are expensive, and most countries lack the medical staff and infrastructure to dispense them widely.

A diagnosis of HIV often is a death sentence, experts say. Last year alone, 2.4 million people died of AIDS causes in sub-Saharan Africa.

Botswana was the first country in Africa to offer free medicines to all who need them in 2002, and the government says half the estimated 110,000 people in immediate need are being treated.

Rights activists agree on the urgency of reaching the other half. But they worry that many people consent to an HIV test without being prepared psychologically, noting there is a cultural reluctance to question doctors.

A study of prenatal clinics in Botswana’s second city, Francistown, found 90.5 percent of women consented to HIV tests in the first three months of the new policy, compared to just over 75 percent in the last four months of the system requiring patients to volunteer for a test. Many of those women, however, failed to return for their results.

Christine Stegling, of the Botswana Network on Ethics, Law and HIV/AIDS, believes testing numbers are going up because people are starting to see the effects of treatment, not just because they are offered tests more often.

The new approach is also more likely to reach women, who are more frequent visitors to health services because of pregnancies. Men continue to be underrepresented in Botswana’s treatment program.

“At the moment it seems like a numbers game, a total drive to get people to know their status. The question is then what?” Stegling said. “I have a feeling that what is happening is health care providers are getting out of communicating meaningfully with their patients.”

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition of January 27, 2006.

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70,000 new HIV infections reported in China last year

By Associated Press

BEIJING China on Wednesday revised down an estimate of the number of people living in the country with HIV/AIDS, but international health agencies warned that with 70,000 new infections last year, there was no room for complacency.

They also warned that the virus was no longer restricted to drug users and those who sold blood, but had begun to spread quickly among the general population.

“China’s HIV infections have been linked to high-risk behavior. But now, sex work is moving it toward the general population,” WHO China representative Henk Bekedam told reporters at a conference announcing the new figures.

By the end of last year, China had an estimated 650,000 people living with AIDS/HIV, 75,000 of whom had full-blown AIDS, according to the study.

The World Health Organization, China’s Ministry of Health and the United Nations’ AIDS agency jointly produced the study, an update on an earlier assessment of the AIDS epidemic in China in 2003.

Bekedam said that the new estimated infections, roughly 200 a day, showed the situation in China was “more serious than we thought.”

Most of the new cases were injecting drug users and sex workers and their clients, but there was a growing number of infected pregnant mothers and spouses of sex workers’ clients, the report said.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition of January 27, 2006.

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Health Listings

Friday
Immunocise, 11 a.m. at Gay and Lesbian Community Center, 2701 Reagan, 214-521-5124; STD Screening, walk-ins accepted as staffing/volunteers permit, $50 for gonorrhea and chlamydia, Nelson-Tebedo Health Resource Center, appointments available by calling 214-528-2336; HIV Healing Imagery Group, 6 p.m., Hope Counseling Center, call 214-351-5657; Dental Program, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. by appointment, Nelson-Tebedo Health Resource Center, 4012 Cedar Springs, 214-528-2336; Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders, free support group, 8-9:30 p.m., Baylor University Medical Center, Truett Hospital Room 1115A, call Lisa at 794-4977 or Baylor at 214-820-7676; Compulsive Eaters Anonymous, 7 p.m., Eastridge Park Christian Church, 2701 N. Town East Blvd., Mesquite, 214-321-2504.

Saturday
HIV/AIDS Support Group for African American Men and Women, 10 a.m.-noon, St. George’s Episcopal Church, 1729 S. Beckley, 214-371-1900; AIDS Bereavement Therapy & Support Group, 11 a.m., 214-559-0688; Lesbian Group, 1 p.m., Counseling Institute of Irving, 1300 Walnut Hill #200, 972-380-7320; Overeaters Anonymous gay and lesbian group, 5 p.m., Cathedral of Hope, 5910 Cedar Springs, 214-488-3301; Support Group for Lesbians in Irving Area, 1 p.m., 1300 Walnut Hill Suite 200, 972-550-8369; Compulsive Eaters Anonymous, 10 a.m., Eastridge Park Christian Church, 2701 N. Town East Blvd., Mesquite, 214-321-2504.

Sunday
Support Group for Parents and Adult Siblings of PWAs, 1 p.m., Cathedral of Hope, 5910 Cedar Springs Rd., 214-559-4899; Survivors of Incest Anonymous-Lesbian Group, 6-8 p.m., 972-644-6906.

Monday
Immunocise, 11 a.m. at Gay and Lesbian Community Center, 2701 Reagan, 214-521-5124; STD Screening, $50 for gonorrhea and
chalmydia, free for syphilis, free syphilis treatment for positive results; 3-7 p.m., Nelson-Tebedo Health Resource Center, 4012 Cedar Springs, 214-528-2336; HIV testing, anonymous/confidential, $20 fee, 3-6 p.m., Nelson-Tebedo Health Resource Center, 4012 Cedar Springs, 214-528-2336; Fitness Quest for all community members, 6-7 p.m., Katy Trail, Lemmon at Carlisle, walk, run, blade, bike, call 214-521-5124; HIV-Positive Support Group, 1-2:30 p.m., Legacy Counseling Center, 4054 McKinney, Suite 212, 214-520-6308; Positive Living, HIV/AIDS rap session for African-American Men, 6-8 p.m. at New Hope Baptist Church, 5002 S. Central Expressway, 214-324-1031; Lab Draws (physician order required, appointment unnecessary), 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Nelson-Tebedo Health Resource Center, 4012 Cedar Springs, 214-528-2336; Dental Program, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. by appointment, Nelson-Tebedo Health Resource Center, 4012 Cedar Springs, 214-528-2336; HIV-Positive Support Group, 6:30-8 p.m., Legacy Counseling Center, 4054 McKinney, Suite 212, 214-520-6308; Free fitness class open to all, 6 p.m., Gay and Lesbian Community Center, 2701 Reagan, 214-528-9254 ext 115; Support Group for African American Family Members and Significant Others, 6:30-8:30 p.m., AIDS Interfaith Network, 1005 W. Jefferson, Suite 301, 214-559-4899; Grupo de Apoyo-Hispano, 7 p.m., Parkland Hospital Outpatient Clinic, 214-590-5415; Living
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Continued from Previous Page
Positive Group, 6:30-8 p.m., Hope Counseling Center, 5910 Cedar Springs, 214-351-5657; Compulsive Eaters Anonymous, 7 p.m., Eastridge Park Christian Church, 2701 N. Town East Blvd., Mesquite, 214-321-2504; Gay/Lesbian Overeaters Anonymous, 7 p.m., Celebration Community Church, 908 Pennsylvania, Fort Worth, 817-847-9648.

Tuesday
Continued Care Support Group for any GLBT person who has been in a substance abuse treatment center or psychiatric hospital in the past year, 6-8 p.m., Pride Institute of Texas, call Jay Lewis at 214-207-5903; Immunocise, Gay and Lesbian Community Center, 11 a.m., call 214-521-5124; Lesbian Group, 7 p.m. at Wellness in the Parks Counseling Center, 5217 McKinney, call 214-521-9019; Recovery Substance Abuse Group, 10 a.m., AIDS Services of Dallas, 800 N. Lancaster, call 214-941-0523; Couples Supporting Couples group for HIV-positive male couples, 7 p.m., St. Thomas the Apostle Episcopal Church, 6525 Inwood, call 214-559-4899; Gay & Lesbian Group, 7:30 p.m., Counseling Institute of Irving, 1300 Walnut Hill #200, call 972-380-7320; HIV-Positive Support Group, semi-monthly, 6-8 p.m., Legacy Counseling Center, 4054 McKinney, Suite 212, call 214-520-6308; Tuesday Night Wellness Clinic, intake required, Nelson-Tebedo Health Resource Center, 4012 Cedar Springs, call 214-528-2336; Dental Program, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. by appointment, Nelson-Tebedo Health Resource Center, 4012 Cedar Springs, call 214-528-2336; Overeaters Anonymous gay and lesbian group, 7 p.m., 4300 MacArthur, Suite 200, call 214-488-3301; Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders, free support group, 7-8:30 p.m., Lovers Lane United Methodist Church, 5324 Northwest Highway, Upstairs Room 4, call Lisa at 214-794-4977; HIV-Positive Education & Support Group, 12:30 p.m. at AIDS Outreach Center, 801 W. Cannon, Fort Worth, 817-535-1113.

Wednesday
STD Screening, $50 for gonorrhea and chalmydia, 10-noon, 3-7 p.m., Nelson-Tebedo Health Resource Center, 4012 Cedar Springs, 214-528-2336; Immunocise, 11 a.m., Gay and Lesbian Community Center, 2701 Reagan, call 214-521-5124; HIV Testing, anonymous/confidential, $20, 10 a.m. to noon, 3-7 p.m., Nelson-Tebedo Health Resource Center, 4012 Cedar Springs, call 214-528-2336; Fitness Quest for all community members, 6-7 p.m., Katy Trail, call 214-521-5124; HIV Testing and Counseling, Cathedral of Hope, 5910 Cedar Springs, call 214-944-1050; Lab Draws (physician order required, appointment unnecessary), 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Nelson-Tebedo Health Resource Center, 4012 Cedar Springs, call 214-528-2336; African-American male support group at Bluitt-Flowers Health Center, conference room A or B, 6:30-8 p.m., call 214-421-4343; Project Esperanza Spanish Support Group, 6-8 p.m., call Laura Trujillo Koster at 214-526-1704; Dental Program, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. by appointment, Nelson-Tebedo Health Resource Center, 4012 Cedar Springs, call 214-528-2336; Living with HIV support group, 10:30 a.m., Veteran’s Medical Center, 4500 S. Lancaster Road, call 972-376-5451 ext. 7253; HIV/AIDS Support Group, 2 p.m., Parkland Hospital Outpatient Clinic, call 214-590-5536; Bereavement Group, 6-8:30 p.m., Legacy Counseling Center, 4054 McKinney, Suite 212, call 214-520-6308; Co-Dependents Anonymous Newcomers Meeting, 7:30 p.m., St. Thomas the Apostle Episcopal Church, 6525 Inwood, call 214-766-8939; Co-Dependents Anonymous group, 7:30 p.m., Church of St. Thomas the Apostle, 6525 Inwood, call 214-766-8939; Coming Out Group, 7-8 p.m., free but donations requested for AIDS Resource Center food pantry, call Ron Wilkinson, Ph.D. at 214-522-9909; AIDS Bereavement Group, 7:30-9 p.m., Hope Counseling Center, 5910 Cedar Springs Rd., call 214-351-5657 for intake; Lesbian Support Groups, 5:30-7 p.m. and 7:30-9 p.m., Hope Counseling Center, 5910 Cedar Springs, call 214-351-5657 for intake; Living Positive Group, 6-7:30 p.m., Hope Counseling Center, 5910 Cedar Springs, call 214-351-5657 for intake; Sexual Compulsivity Group, 5-6:30 p.m., Hope Counseling Center, 5910 Cedar Springs, call 214-351-5657 for intake.

Thursday
STD Screening, $50 for gonorrhea and chalmydia, 3-7 p.m., Nelson-Tebedo Health Resource Center, 4012 Cedar Springs, 214-528-2336; Immunocise, 11 a.m., Gay and Lesbian Community Center, 2701 Reagan, call 214-521-5124; Renaissance III, group providing AIDS information and services for gay African American men, 2606 MLK Jr. Blvd, Suite 203, call for times or other information, 214-421-4343; HIV testing, anonymous/confidential, $20, 3-6 p.m., Nelson-Tebedo Health Resource Center, 4012 Cedar Springs, 214-528-2336; Lab Draws (physician order required, appointment unnecessary), 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Nelson-Tebedo Health Resource Center, 4012 Cedar Springs, call 214-528-2336; Dental Program, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. by appointment, Nelson-Tebedo Health Resource Center, 4012 Cedar Springs, call 214-528-2336; HIV-Positive Therapy Group for Women, 11 a.m.-noon, Legacy Counseling Center, 4054 McKinney, Suite 212, call 214-520-6308; Free fitness class open to all including yoga, aerobics, strength training, 6 p.m., Gay and Lesbian Community Center, 2701 Reagan, call 214-528-9254 ext 115; General Issues Group for Gays, Lesbians and Bisexuals, 6:30-8 p.m., Hope Counseling Center, 5910 Cedar Springs, call 214-351-5657 for intake; Diabetes & HIV Support Group, semi-monthly, 1-2 p.m., Legacy Counseling Center, 4054 McKinney, Suite 212, call 214-520-6308; Bethany HIV Support Group, 7 p.m., call 214-823-2317; HIV-AIDS Support Group, 7 p.m., Parkland Hospital Outpatient Clinic, call 214-590-5536; HIV Positive Support Group, 7 p.m., Bethany Presbyterian Church, 4523 Cedar Springs, call 214-944-1050; HIV/AIDS Group in Irving Area, 7 p.m. at 1300 Walnut Hill Suite 200, call 972-550-8369; Compulsive Eaters Anonymous, 7 p.m., Eastridge Park Christian Church, 2701 N. Town East Blvd., Mesquite, 214-321-2504; Diabetes & HIV Support Group, 1-2 p.m., Legacy Counseling Center, call 214-520-6308; Bethany HIV Support Group, 7 p.m., Bethany Presbyterian Church, call 214-823-2317; HIV-AIDS Support Group, 7 p.m., Parkland Hospital Outpatient Clinic, call 214-590-5536; HIV Positive Support Group, 7 p.m., Bethany Presbyterian Church, 4523 Cedar Springs, call 214-944-1050; HIV/AIDS Group in Irving Area, 7 p.m. at 1300 Walnut Hill Suite 200, call 972-550-8369; Dental Program, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. by appointment, Nelson-Tebedo Health Resource Center, 4012 Cedar Springs, call 214-528-2336; HIV-Positive Therapy Group for Women, 11 a.m.-noon, Legacy Counseling Center, 4054 McKinney, Suite 212, call 214-520-6308; Free fitness class open to all includes yoga, aerobics and more, 6 p.m., Gay and Lesbian Community Center, 2701 Reagan, call 214-528-9254 ext 115; Compulsive Eaters Anonymous, 7 p.m., Eastridge Park Christian Church, 2701 N. Town East Blvd., Mesquite, 214-321-2504; Issues Group, 6:30 p.m., Hope Counseling Center at Cathedral of Hope, 5910 Cedar Springs, call 214-351-5657.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition of January 27, 2006.

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