Pet of the Week


Khan is a 1-year-old Shih Tzu-Chinese Crested available for adoption from Operation Kindness. He weighs just 13 pounds, is easy-going and good with other dogs. Khan loves to play, and his favorite game is fetch. He’s neutered, vaccinated and microchipped.

Dogs, cats, puppies and kittens are available for adoption from Operation Kindness, 3201 Earhart Drive (near Keller Springs Road and Midway Road), Carrollton. The no-kill shelter is open Monday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. (until 8 p.m. Thursday) and Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. Cost to adopt is $110 for cats and kittens and $135 for dogs and puppies. The cost includes spay or neuter surgery, microchipping, vaccinations and other tests. Those 65 and above and those who adopt two pets at the same time get a $20 discount. For more information call 972-418-PAWS, or visit www.operationkindness.org.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition November 30, 2007

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White supremacist charged with gay man’s murder

By Associated Press

Authorities say Darrell Madden and a friend, both members of Aryan Brotherhood prison group, killed Steven Domer in gang initiation rite



Darrell Lynn Madden

An alleged white supremacist has been charged with murdering a gay man in what officials say may have been part of a gang initiation.

Darrell Lynn Madden was charged on Wednesday, Nov. 28, with the October slaying of Steven Domer, 62. Madden also is charged with murder in the death of his friend, Bradley Qualls.

Authorities allege Madden, 37, and Qualls, 26, were connected to the white supremacist group United Aryan Brotherhood. According to an affidavit filed with the latest charge, Domer’s death apparently was meant to be the violent act that earned a place in the gang for Qualls.

Domer, who friends said was gay, was last seen Oct. 26 near a car wash, according to court papers. A witness said Domer had been talking to two men who matched the description of Madden and Qualls.

Domer’s car was found the next day near Madden’s home, according to an affidavit from Oklahoma City police Detective Kenneth Whitebird. Madden’s roommate told police he heard Madden and another man describing an encounter with someone who “wouldn’t even fight back,” while a woman Madden had dated said she overheard him and Qualls talk about killing a man.

Madden will not face a hate crime charge because sexual orientation is not covered under Oklahoma law, prosecutors said.

Qualls died about 10 days after Domer’s disappearance. Police have said the motive appears to be a disagreement.

District attorney offices in Carter and Oklahoma counties, where Madden is charged with murder, said there is no attorney of record for Madden yet.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition November 30, 2007

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National Briefs

By Associated Press

The Associated Press Christian group suing to overturn law

SACRAMENTO The Christian group Advocates for Faith and Freedom, based in Southern California, is suing the state over a law that prohibits anti-gay discrimination in schools.

The group filed the lawsuit Tuesday, Nov. 27, in U.S. District Court in San Diego. It claims the law is unconstitutionally vague and violates student privacy.

Gay state Sen. Sheila Kuehl wrote the bill and says it is intended to consolidate existing state education laws that already prohibit discrimination based on sexual orientation. Opponents say the law promotes gay lifestyles to children.

Gay man wins R.I. Assembly seat

Frank Ferri, a community activist who serves as chair of Marriage Equality Rhode Island, has won a special election to fill a vacant seat in the Rhode Island General Assembly. He joins Gordon Fox, who has been the sole out member of the state’s legislature.

Civil union licenses ready in N.H.

CONCORD, N.H. Same-sex couples seeking civil unions will be able to obtain licenses at New Hampshire town and city halls on beginning Dec. 10. Deputy Secretary of State Dave Scanlan said the licenses will be ready for couples who want to get them as soon as they go into effect at 12:01 a.m. on Jan. 1.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition November 30, 2007

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World Briefs

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Good parenting not dependent on sexual orientation of parents

By Libby Post – Lesbian Notions

Despite frantic rhetoric of right wingers, studies from reputable sources says gays, lesbians can be just as good as straights at being parents



Kathy Torpey and her partner, Michelle Ferri, and their children AIdan and Brian Mack, head into the White House Easter Egg Roll in March of 2006. The two moms wear rainbow colored leis symbolizing families with same sex partners. Gays and lesbians put a great deal of time, effort and love into becoming parents. (MANUEL BALCE CENETA/Associated Press)

We were in Provincetown for a much-needed vacation this year the week after “Family Week.”

There wasn’t much evidence of the thousands of kids and parents who made the pilgrimage. No broken strollers strewn about like urban detritus. No echoes of children crying.

All that was left were the contents of cash registers of local merchants and talk about how difficult it was to maneuver past all the strollers in tight store aisles.

The national LGBT family advocacy group, Family Pride, sponsors Family Week each year. This year, R Family Vacations got into the act as well. R Family is run by Kelli O’Donnell, Rosie’s wife, and produced all the large-scale events in P-town that week dinners, cabarets, etc.

Oh, how things have changed!

I remember when we were quite tentative talking about our families. We didn’t want to draw too much attention out of fear of legal retribution.

Many of us in the community weren’t looking to have families in the traditional sense of kids and parents. I, for one, fell into parenthood, since my partner had a child from a previous, straight marriage. My biological clock was never wound, let alone ticking, so having kids was never on my radar.

It’s only been in the last decade or so that our families have really gotten onto anyone else’s radar other than our own. It took until 1997 for the first state New Jersey to expressly authorize adoptions by lesbian or gay couples.

No, the legislature didn’t do it. The courts did, in a case called Gallucio v. New Jersey.

Ten years later, lesbian and gay families in New Jersey some from adoption or foster care, some biological in nature now also have a civil unions law that is supposed to extend all the rights and responsibilities of familydom on them as well.

Given how difficult it has been for lesbian and gay couples who have been civil-unionized in the Garden State to exact benefits from their employers, I’m not convinced that those families will be fully covered by the law either.

But at least lesbian and gay couples can adopt and be foster parents in New Jersey. Florida still has an outright ban, as do Utah and Mississippi, only theirs is more like equal opportunity discrimination only married couples are allowed to adopt, period.

Utah also forbids unmarried couples from becoming foster parents, while Nebraska has a policy that explicitly prohibits us from being foster parents.
Thankfully, many more states do not take such a draconian view regarding our families.

California, Maryland, Massachusetts, Nevada, New York, Connecticut, Illinois, Indiana, Pennsylvania, Vermont, and the District of Columbia also have policies or laws on the books that implicitly or explicitly state that sexual orientation cannot be a basis for preventing gay and lesbian people from adopting.

Given the number of children in need in this country, it is time for many of the country’s adoption agencies and county departments of social services to take their heads out of their collective butts and start recruiting lesbian and gay foster and adoptive parents.

According to a recent report by The Williams Institute of the UCLA School of Law entitled “Adoption and Foster Care by Gay and Lesbian Parents in the United States,” there are plenty of us to go around.

Using the 2000 U.S. Census, the National Survey of Family Growth (2002), and the Adoption and Foster Care Analysis and Reporting System (2004), the report estimates that there are two million or so gay, lesbian, and bisexual people interested in adopting.

Given that half a million children currently live in foster care and more than 100,000 of those children are awaiting adoption, making foster parenting and adoption available to lesbians, gay men, and bisexuals who want children could solve this national problem overnight.

Right now, there are approximately 65,000 adopted children living with a lesbian or gay parent, accounting for 4 percent of all the adopted children in the country. An additional 14,000 foster kids are living with us as well we’re already raising 3 percent of those kids.

Despite the histrionics of groups like Focus on the Family and the American Family Association, we make perfectly good parents. Reputable, professional organizations such as the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, the American Medical Association, the Child Welfare League of America, and the North American Council on Adoptable Children all agree that sexual orientation has absolutely no bearing on one’s ability to raise a child.

Gay or straight, some of us make good parents, and some of us don’t. Who we sleep with has absolutely nothing to do with our ability to raise children.

While many straight people don’t necessarily plan to have children, it is a deliberate decision that lesbian and gay couples do not enter into lightly.

But we do enter it with a lot of love.

Libby Post is a political commentator on public radio, on the Web, and in print.

E-mail LesbianNotions@qsyndicate.com

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition November 30, 2007

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Knowledgeable Sources

“We know the vows of abstinence break far more easily than latex condoms.”
Former U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Jocelyn Elders, who will speak in Dallas at a World AIDS Day event on Friday, Nov. 30, on the shortcomings of abstinence-only sex education

“I think the community has realized that nationwide Americans are not there yet when it comes to gay marriage and are willing to commit to a candidate who will evolve on this issue as the rest of America does.”
Jesse Garcia, president of Stonewall Democrats of Dallas, on which presidential candidate to support

“We believe that staying at the table and negotiating in support of the best possible bill was better than simply walking away.”
HRC spokesman Brad Luna, in response to
criticism from transgender activist Donna Rose over HRC’s support for a non-transgender inclusive version of ENDA

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition November 30, 2007.

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Celebrity Watch


Meet Buddy G and his two moms

Two moms who split time between Austin and Omaha, Neb., are launching a straight-to-DVD cartoon that reflects their own life together as parents of a young boy.

“Buddy G My Two Moms and Me” is about a 5-year-old with two moms who loves science and uses a computer strapped to his arm to solve problems.

Executive producer Margaux Towne-Colley said Wednesday, Nov. 28, that the DVDs are “selling like hot cakes.” She said most reaction to the $10 DVD has been positive so far, although she does expect some negatives: “There’s people out there who would like to pretend families like ours don’t exist, but we do.”

Towne-Colley and her partner Donna Colley’s animation studio, 3D Magic Factory, is in Austin.

The first episode of “Buddy G” talks about the value of being truthful, along with a few facts about how metal detectors work. Future episodes were to include other families, including ones with two dads.

Katherine Heigl speaks “‘The Ugly Truth’
“Ugly” isn’t a word that describes Emmy-winning “Grey’s Anatomy” and “Knocked Up” star Katherine Heigl, but T.R. Knight’s BFF is about to go before the cameras for gay director Robert Luketic in a romantic comedy called “The Ugly Truth.”

The story centers on successful TV producer Heigl hiring one of those harsh, tell-it-like-it-is relationship advice professionals for her show.

His brash style conflicts with her views on the world, naturally, until she begins to find that his “ugly truth” style of dating tips really do help her find the guy she’s always wanted.

In other words, another film to confirm that straight people really are an odd bunch, made all the more subversive one hopes by having a gay director at the controls.

No word on a male lead yet, but a start date of April 15 is set, so audiences will probably see how ugly it all gets sometime in early 2009.

Rogen and Banks join Kevin Smith’s “‘Porno’
Kevin Smith loves the gays, and we love him right back.
The “Clerks” and “Chasing Amy” writer-director always includes queer elements in his literately raunchy comedies, and he even graced the cover of gay lifestyle magazine “A Bear’s Life.” So there’s bound to be some same-sex action included in his upcoming “Zack and Miri Make a Porno.”

We’ve mentioned this film before, but now some recasting of the leads (Rosario Dawson was Smith’s muse on this at first) is on deck: Seth Rogen and Elizabeth Banks (he of “Knocked Up,” she of “Fred Claus,” both of “The 40-Year-Old Virgin”) will play the title characters, a platonic pair of best friends who enter the world of amateur porn to help pay the bills. But will the experience make them discover they’re not so platonic? Find out when “Zack and Miri” opens in 2008.

Guinevere Turner TV project gets a “‘Go’
If we ran Hollywood, our first official act even before paying writers what they’re worth would be to give writer-actress Guinevere Turner (“Go Fish,” “The Notorious Bettie Page,” “American Psycho”) all the work she can handle.

So it’s exciting to hear that Turner will be putting on her actress cap again for “Don’t Go,” an upcoming TV pilot about the lives and loves of the residents of an L.A. fourplex that sounds like “Melrose Place” meets “The L Word.”

The racially mixed cast includes several African-American up-and-coming actors as well as South Asian “Chutney Popcorn” star Nisha Ganatra, so it sounds more like the real L.A. than the TV version we so often get.

Van Sant, Campion, Penn all have “’8′
When directors aren’t busy dealing with the stress of helming a feature-length film, sometimes they like to unwind by popping off a little short film.

Witness this year’s art-house hit “Paris, Je t’aime” for the proof on that. And now, a less winsome, more activist-minded anthology film is in the works, titled simply “8.”

The project involves eight directors focusing on various international crises, including hunger, poverty, education, child mortality and the shortage of adequate drinking water in developing nations.

Gay director Gus Van Sant, acclaimed filmmaker Jane Campion (“The Piano”), Oscar-winning actor and sometimes director Sean Penn, and controversial French director Gaspar Noe (“Irreversible”) will all participate, with Noe tackling AIDS in a short called “SIDA.”

It might not sound like a lot of laughs, but with these directors on board, you know it’s going to be compelling viewing. Look for “8″ in art-houses sometime in 2008.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition November 30, 2007.

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America’s top gay model

By Daniel A. Kusner Life+Style Editor

Reality-TV stud J.P. Calderon dissects his boss, Janice Dickinson



When it started out, “Janice Dickinson’s Modeling Agency” was only poised to be an “America’s Next Top Model” spin-off. Not only has it survived, some could argue that it has a wider appeal than Tyra Banks’ reality contest.

The third season of “Janice Dickinson” begins Tuesday. And in the previous season, Dickinson practically held J.P. Calderon in her arms as the camera-ready stud modeled for Instinct magazine, which only features gay men on its cover. Calderon was hardly a reality-show virgin: In 2006, he was featured in “Survivor: Cook Islands” as the presumably “straight” professional volleyball player.

Some dismiss Dickinson as a hotheaded and bitchy drama queen. But as Calderon stressed over coming out, a different side of Dickinson emerged: compassionate and encouraging.

Earlier this week, Calderon phoned the Dallas Voice offices to discuss modeling techniques, hitting on overly handsome dudes and sizing up the fierce diva who runs his modeling agency.

Are the rumors true that you dated gay “Survivor” cast member Brad Virata, the Filipino-Hawaiian hottie? No. None of it was true. I wasn’t even out at the time. I was still being a straight guy.

You’ve been working with 2xist underwear a lot. Any other modeling jobs coming out? I just did a spread in “Tetu,” which is a gay magazine in France. I also book a lot of high-fashion editorial around the world.

Are these jobs you book through Janice Dickinson’s agency? I work with another agency as well. There are rules about it. But every model works with different agencies in different regions. But Janice’s agency is where I got my start.

Have you ever argued with Janice? No. Never. I’ve been yelled at by her. But she yells at everyone.

Could you win an argument with her? I’d hate do even go there. Honestly, it depends on how strong you believe in your convictions. Hopefully, I’d win. But she’s a tough cookie.

Who’s the villain on the show? If there has to be a villain, it’s her business partner, Peter.

Does Janice’s agency always pay you? That’s a big issue and that’s an issue with Peter. New models don’t realize that it takes a while to get paid, which is standard. But Peter takes money out of our checks for miscellaneous reasons. And that’s where things get really sketchy.

What modeling techniques have you’ve learned? You can sell yourself 10 different ways just by changing your eyes. Modeling isn’t just being pretty or looking hot. It’s how you connect with the camera, how you convey an image. And the connection can be very subtle. But the expression in your eyes is what really changes the picture: You can be inviting, happy, seductive or stern.

When you’re attracted to a guy, do you ever strike up the conversation? I’m usually too intimidated.

You wait for them to come to you? I don’t play the waiting game. And I don’t want to sound cocky. I just wait because of insecurity. I feel if they come up to me, at least I know they’re interested. I’m too afraid to take that chance.

What turns you off when dudes approach you? When the focal point of the conversation becomes all about them.

Are you single? No. I’m dating someone.

You look incredibly lean: What’s your waist size? I’m 6’2″ and my waist is 31 inches.

What’s the largest waist size of the guys you’ve dated. Probably 34 inches.

Janice seemed very instrumental in your coming out process. Did she give you any solid advice? She did. I had a really hard time with it. And they edited a lot out, which made me look more dignified. Janice didn’t push me. She saw that I was really struggling. And afterwards, she took me out without cameras or anything. She told me that she was so tough because she had role models. And that all her role models were gay men. She also said that no one is tougher than a gay man that gay men taught her about drive, ambition and being tough. I guess when Janice was down and out, it was gay men who picked her up, put her back on her feet and kept her going. I’ll never forget that.



TUNE IN
Season three
of “The Janice Dickinson Modeling Agency” airs
Dec. 4 at 9:30 p.m. on Oxygen.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition November 30, 2007

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Query of the Week

By John Wright Staff Writer

Do you feel safe using the Katy Trail given the latest violent attack, which occurred Tuesday, Nov. 27?

“I think the feeling of people who use the trail a lot is that it’s pretty darn safe, so this surprises me that there’s been another attack, particularly in broad daylight.”
Harden Wiedemann
Investments

“That’s funny because I normally bring my mace, but I forgot it today. I feel better if I have my mace with me. It’s kind of scary.”
Share Murphy
Housewife

“I would say less so, but being men I think we have less of a chance of problems than unescorted girls.”
Fred Penn
Financial adviser

“I was walking by here shortly after it happened. I don’t carry my billfold or anything with me, so I feel like if they try something, they won’t get anything. It does make me a little nervous.”
Atticus Thomas
Accountant

“I’m always thinking that it’s never going to happen to me, but that’s really scary. I feel more safe with my dog. That is creepy.”
Abby Lundberg
Law student


Have a suggestion for a question you’d like us to ask? E-mail it to editor@dallasvoice.com.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition November 30, 2007.

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Monthly pinup pizazz

With visions of New Year’s Eve dancing in your head, it’s time to consider the holiday tradition of acquiring a 2008 calendar for you or for someone’s stocking you want to stuff. Here are some beefcake calendars that recently caught our attention.


Bigger, better

From strapping cowboys to hairy-chested musclemen, Colt Studios has six 2008 calendars to choose from. In 2007, Highland Park native Tom Chase made a Colt comeback, starring in three videos. Along with Brad Patton, Chase is featured on the “Couples 2008″ cover and when you go for duo pictorials, you get twice as many studs.
$15. 95, available at COLTstudio.com



Hebrew hotness

Dallas is home to one of the world’s most photographed bodybuilders. Israeli-born Sagi Kalev has been a cover boy for Muscle and Fitness, Men’s Workout and countless others. His physique is immaculately proportioned. His face could launch a thousand ships. And he’s as straight as a laser beam. But Kalev knows he has an immense gay fan base, and in the past he’s even put his bachelorhood on the auction block for the Lone Star Ride Fighting AIDS. His 2008 pinup is written in four different languages.

$13.99, available at SagiKalev.com. Allow 30 days for delivery.



Latter-Day sexiness

It’s the strangest male pinup of the year: the 2008 Men on a Mission calendar. Yes, 12 Mormons to tempt y’all each month. Shirtless coverboy Matthew (shouldn’t he be wearing his Mormon undergarment?) is on a mission to help people change their lives “from bad to good and from good to better.”

Publicists for the calendar asked Dallas Voice if we wanted to interview any of the missionaries under the stipulation that no questions addressed their sex lives. We passed.
$14.95, available at Stonebriar Centre.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition November 30, 2007

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