'Don't ask, don't tell': don't repeal

Posted on 10 Feb 2010 at 7:37am
Former Rep. Duncan Hunter
Former Rep. Duncan Hunter

Former Rep. Duncan Hunter was interviewed by NPR. The intro to the interview is wrong. Hunter did not serve in Iraq and Afghanistan, as Melissa Block said in the intro. He served in Congress from 1981 to 2009.

That’s kind of an important little detail. It makes it sound like he has current military experience that other members of Congress do not.

However, he did serve in Vietnam in 1970-71. (Don’t worry. His district is now ably represented by his son, Duncan D. Hunter). During the Vietnam War, there was a draft and being gay was not a reason to get a deferment. I know. I tried. It was a reason to be drafted, get the most dangerous assignment in Vietnam, and if you came back alive, get a dishonorable discharge.

Here are some of Hunter’s arguments against allowing gays and lesbians to serve:

And I think the folks who have been in the military that have been in these very close situations with each other, there has to be a special bond there. And I think that bond is broken if you open up the military to transgenders, to hermaphrodites, to gays and lesbians.

When you are out of arguments, you lump everyone together. He left out pedophiles, necrophiliacs and people who want to marry animals.

Its going to be like civilian life and the I think that that would be detrimental for the military.

Because gays in the military means opening gay bars on army bases.

… how you go into combat, you know, the shower situation, the bathroom situation, just, you know, very mundane details – things that we have men and women separated, you know, because we dont want to have that sexual distraction. That exists for the homosexual aspect of things, too.

Maybe a psychological test should be given to people entering the military and those who are obsessed with bathrooms and showers should be excluded, not gays and lesbians who are more concerned with defending the country.

It’s like if you want to work for NPR, you don’t go to work and on the first day say, hey, I want everybody to know that I’m gay. You probably dont care one way or the other as long as they, you know, get their particular job done.

HUH? Is he concerned that NPR reporters are showering together or did he just say that it DOESN’T MATTER what someone’s sexual orientation is as long as “they, you know, get their particular job done” ?????

And I’ll bet when one certain lesbian who now works at the Dallas Voice was at the local, comparatively conservative KERA, everyone knew she was a big ole you-know-what from day one.

But he goes by the assumption that you wouldn’t come at a job on the first day. Most gays or lesbians in the military wouldn’t either. But on the job, you sometimes have to come out pretty quickly – at least to Human Resources – to get a partner on your insurance or to name an insurance beneficiary or just to list a contact. Although I don’t always come out on first meeting, when someone tells me about his or her spouse, I tell them about mine.

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