Gayborhood artisans

Posted on 23 Apr 2009 at 2:26pm
By Daniel A. Kusner Life+Style Editor

Big D’s creative forces unite for the Cedar Springs Art Fest: Meet queer vendors Clint Mordecai and Sherry Henry

SATURDAY ALONG THE STRIP
More than 200 artists and vendors are expected at the CSMA Art Fest 2009, which stretches along "the crossroads": from Cedar Springs Road at Regan Street to Throckmorton Avenue at Dickason Avenue.

Apr. 25, from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Free. ShopCedarSprings.com


PAINTING GANGSTA-RICH BEYOTCHES
Clint Mordecai is all too familiar with Dallas’ flashy-cash reputation — especially in this economy. That’s why his comics-like acrylic paintings feature heroines who are either brandishing firearms or are overflowing with bling, like "Diamond Run," featured above.


A former fashion major at Art Institute of Dallas, Mordecai started painting about eight years ago. You may have seen his work adorning the walls of at JR’s Bar and Grill or in the gallery at KD Studios, where the Uptown Players perform.
This weekend will be a busy one. On Friday night, Mordecai unveils "The Dollhouse," new works that will be on display at The Element apartments. And on Saturday, he’ll have a booth at the Cedar Springs Merchant Association’s Art Fest. His 18"x24" works will be priced in the $100-$500 range.

QUESTIONABLE FASHION
As a former vice president of Team Dallas, the gay squad of athletes that competed in Gay Games Chicago, Sherry Henry is also political news junkie. She loved the late Tim Russert, but also keeps tabs on conservatives like Sean Hannity and even Rush Limbaugh. She gets a kick out of listening to polarizing debates about race, war, religion, stem-cell research, 9/11, immigration, federal bailouts and gay rights.

After taking a buyout package from Verizon, Henry wanted a new adventure. She took a cue from Heidi Matonis’ company Positivitee — the Oprah-endorsed T-shirt line that aims to spread messages of inspiration instead of criticism. So in 2007, Henry launched Politeed.com — an online T-shirt company that encourages political debate. Instead of taking sides, Henry’s line features questions that could spark debate. Launched in August 2007, her first shirt asked "Are gay rights civil rights?"

On her Web site, folks can examine information about foreign policies, abortion rights and terrorism. Y’all can post critical answers to Henry’s questions, too. So far, Henry’s demographic seems to appeal to college students. The Cedar Springs Art Fest will be one of her first times marketing in the gayborhood (T-shirts $19.99).

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition April 24, 2009.

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