Holiday GIft Guide 2009: home+hearth

Posted on 18 Oct 2009 at 10:40pm

DA VINCI MODE

These sculptures are based on Da Vinci’s Vitruvian Man but take him to a whole other level. As a home accent, they combine masculinity with grace. And in a range of sizes and styles from $39–$160, no doubt you’ll find just the right one.

TapeLenders, 3926 Cedar Springs Road. 214-528-6344. Tapelenders.com.

DECKING THE HALLS

Not sure if wreaths and boughs of holly are the same? Either way, these decorative trimmings will add some major sparkle to the ornaments and treetoppers. Designed with exquisite bulbs and ribbons, these opulent wreaths will have any house overflowing with holiday glee. Customs wreaths are made to order and run $65–$260.

All Occasions Florist, 3428 Oak Lawn Ave.

214-528-0898.

TEA TIME FOR PLANTS

These teapots look like Alice may have used them in Wonderland. Instead, they add a chipper feeling when watering the plants. And often the chore is done, these don’t have to go back into the dowdy gardening shed. Keep these teapot watering cans on the sill or counter as charming decorations. Prices range from $9.99–$19.99.

North Haven Gardens, 7700 Northaven Road.
214-363-5316. NHG.com.

ULTRA COOL

You could argue this sculpture matches the Dallas Cowboys colors in case you’re giving it to a die-hard fan. If not, then it’s cred as Russian art sculpted by Ivan Alkhazaschvilly should be a great selling point. Either way, its cool design will likely catch people’s eyes. The 30-inch tall piece is made of stainless steel on a granite base and priced at $183.

Dulce, 2914 Oak Lawn Ave. 214-219-5656.

WHO’S THE BOSS?

We’ll avoid the cliché that lesbians like tools and gay men like cooking utensils. Because frankly, even a big ol’ queen has to look twice at this impossibly useful product. The Bucket Boss is simple: A canvas liner that slips comfortably over any utility bucket. But with more slots than Katy No-Pocket’s apron, it can hold every conceivable tool without you having to forage through a clumsy toolbox. It’s enough to turn even the nelliest mani-pedi addict into a gearhead. $25.95.

Elliott’s Hardware, 4901 Maple Ave. ElliottsHardware.com.

HAPPY EVER AFTER

There are plates for eating and then plates for, well, not eating. At least that’s what Mother always said. These Fairy Tale plates with ornately designed rims and depictions of various children’s stories in beautiful colors are hardly ones to serve scones on. Instead, these would liven up any mantle or even the walls of a child’s room. Of course, some people might live on the edge and have a bit of a bite off these dishes. But they’ll evoke smiles no matter how they are used. At $10 each, snag another one or two while you’re at it.

Lula B’s West, 1010 North Industrial Blvd.
214-749-1929. Lula-Bs.com.


SOUND MACHINE


McKintosh has been creating some of the best stereos for years but it finally enters the tabletop market with its MXA60 integrated audio system and compact disc player. This high-tech gift will look slick in the home office or even on the kitchen counter, and despite its smaller size;, it’s big on sound. The 60th anniversary edition is priced at $7,500.

Modia Home Theater, 4415 North Central Expressway.
214-520-0909. Modia.com.

MENORAH JONES

Even though the pomegranate is the trendy health product right now, ot has been a symbol in Jewish culture for ages. Designer Michael Aram designed this take by combining Jewish tradition and the metaphoric fruit. His nickel-plated and oxidized bronze pomegranate menorah is both minimal in design and elegant in presence and priced at $159. It is said good deeds should match the number of seeds in a pom. This one as a gift might count as two.

Aneita Fern, 5213 Alpha Road. 972-392-9277. AneitaFern.com.

FUNKY MONKEY

This little guy is just waiting for a place to sit and finish his book.  This simian home accent will add some old world charm to any mantle or bookcase with a bit of playfulness. Just be sure kiddos don’t confuse him with those toy monkeys with cymbals. That could be troubling. These
figurines are available in two styles at $12.99 a pair.

The Consignment Store, 5290 Beltline Road, Suite 122.
972-991-6268. DallasConsign.com.

PLACES IN THE ART

Kathy Kromer’s colorful series, Random Hearts, is both fun and affordable. With strong pops of color, her work should liven up any wall. Painted on various sized wooden boxes, the pieces are also ready to hang. Who doesn’t like easy in their gifts? Her work ranges from $80–$125.

Artisan Style, 2417 Mahon St. 214-991-1919. ArtisanStyle.net.

BLOWN AWAY

This sculpture is like an Escher painting. It’s fun to stare at and let the eye get used to it. "Amorous Wind" is one of many resin-cast sculptures in Zuri Furniture’s line of home accents. They are all hand-finished and mounted on black granite. The sculptures are priced from $165–$515.

Zuri Furniture, 4880 Alpha Road.
972-716-9874. ZuriFurniture.com.

CANINE COLORS

These Ron Burns prints are ideal for any animal lover — and not just because he depicts cats and dogs. Some of his subjects were animal shelter babies and portions of the proceeds from these prints fund the shelters he worked with. Burns brings them to life in color-rich paintings a la Warhol and Marilyn Monroe. Prices for the framed prints start at $119 with 25 percent off any purchase.

Art Frame Expo, 5650 E. Mockingbird Lane. 214-824-1214.

REEL TIME

No one can be late for a movie again with this timepiece. Made from an actual film reel, this clock will keep anyone on time. It’s great for anywhere in the house but for those movie lovers with a media room, this clock priced at $85 will be perfect.

Lula B’s Antique Mall, 2004 Greenville Ave. 214-824-2185.

PILLOW TALK

These stylish cushions will give any chair or sofa a major uplift. Made in a variety of rich colors, plush shapes and gorgeous fabrics, these might be more art than home décor. Nonetheless, they will add a fancy touch to any spot in the house. The pillows start at $39.

BoConcept, 5301 Alpha Road Suite 110, 972-503-1500,
BoConceptdallas.com.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition November 20, 2009.

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