Letters

Posted on 23 Mar 2006 at 6:50pm

Bush may avoid Nixon’s fate

With his approval rating below 40 percent in most national polls, the president, under the auspices of “executive privilege,” refused to turn over information regarding his alleged illegal spying and wiretapping programs to the Senate Investigative Committee.

Earlier in the investigation into the illegal spying allegations, Democrats requested that the attorney general initiate an investigation. He refused.

The White House press secretary cited the ongoing war and concerns over the dangerous world in which we live as justifications for administration’s claim of secrecy and executive privilege.

In the coming year, this incident caused the resignation of the president, the first time that has happened in our history.

This was the resignation of President Richard Nixon following the Watergate scandal.

There are many comparisons between this bit of history and the highly-questionable spying program of President Bush. Bush, like Nixon, claimed to be a compassionate conservative. Both presidents were accused of conducting illegal spying and wiretapping programs during their second terms. Both presidents were “war presidents,” and both used that as a defense for many of their actions.

But alas, there is a difference between now and the simpler times of 1973. In 1973, the Congress actually felt compelled to do their duty. Today, Republican Senator Pat Roberts of Kansas has decided that the solution is to draft legislation that will make the illegal part of Bush’s spying program legal, and therefore eliminating any need to investigate.

It was a simpler time in 1973. There were some men of principle and integrity that sought out the truth and found the courage to prosecute those that chose to shame our Constitution.

George W. Bush and his spy campaign should be investigated with the full authority of Congress. To do otherwise is to condone misdeeds and promote a monarchy

Jim Ridout
Albuquerque, N.M.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition, March 24, 2006.

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