McClelland elected to water board

Posted on 08 Apr 2010 at 4:20pm
By Staff Reports | editor@dallasvoice.com

Vote makes him Denton County’s first openly gay elected official

John McClelland

LITTLE ELM — Homeowners in Paloma Creek along U.S. 380 — including openly gay candidate John McClelland — were officially elected to the Denton County Fresh Water Supply District 11-A in elections held Thursday, March 25.

McClelland was one of three residents of the master-planned community to win positions on the board of one of its five fresh water supply districts within the development. All three were unopposed.

McClelland, Kenneth Botts and Conrad Davis will be sworn in May 26 at the Paloma Creek Amenity Center at the district meeting.

In a statement released after March 25, McClelland said his election to the water district board makes him the first openly gay person elected to an office in Denton County.

He said, "I do not hide my sexual orientation from anyone, and I am proud of who I am. I hope being the first in this county will encourage other people like me to run for office and not be ashamed of who they are. You run on your merits and you can win."

McClelland is also the current president of Stonewall Democrats of Denton County and a former Democratic nominee for the Texas Legislature.

Fresh water supply districts in Denton County were created for the development of large communities outside the town limits of local municipalities, McClelland explained. The districts are responsible for building roads and sewer access.
Paloma Creek is located between Denton and Frisco, north of Little Elm on U.S. 380. It is divided into districts 8-A, 8-B, 11-A, 11-B, and 11-C.

"As homeowners we felt that it was important to become a part of our local government," McClelland said, explaining why he, Botts and Davis decided to run for board seats. "Residents have gained access to their fresh water supply districts in Savannah and Providence Village already, and Paloma Creek homeowners have not been interested until recently. We wanted to have some say in our tax rate, as well as giving other residents the opportunity to understand how they are represented since we do not live within the scope of an incorporated city."

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition April 9, 2010.

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