Psychic teller, qu’est-ce que c’est?

Posted on 01 Jan 2009 at 9:44am
By STEVEN LINDSEY | Contributing Writer stevencraiglindsey@me.com

The medium is the message for David Scott


CRYSTAL BALL | David Scott has had psychic ability since childhood — which he ably displayed in one memorable session. (Photo courtesy of Tamyra Campbell)

MEDIUM AT LARGE
Scott holds an evening of meditation and more at Crossroads Spiritual Fitness Center, 300 N. Coit Road, #179, Richardson. Oct. 3 at 7 p.m. $20. 972-690-1887. DavidScottPsychic.com.

Coming out of one closet in a lifetime is difficult enough. But for psychic/medium David Scott, it wasn’t the gay one that was the hardest.

"There are several people that were very close to me in my life that I never shared [my ability] with until recently," he says.

Ever since Scott was a child, he knew he was different. Not only did he hear voices, he’d see people in his room at night. Unlike most kids, his "imaginary" friends were real.

"As a very young child, I remember in my room I thought I saw Jesus standing at the foot of my bed once. But as I got older and had a spiritual awakening, I now realize that what I saw was my spirit guide. When I connect with him now, he has the look of the stereotypical ‘Jesus’ that we all have seen paintings and pictures of growing up," he says. "I never pursued what I could do as a child and even into my younger years as an adult."

Being reared by a devoutly Christian family in a conservative Midwestern town, he dared not talk about his experience, and considered his ability evil.

"I knew there was something else out there. I always considered myself Christian, but never felt I was getting what I needed on a spiritual level," he says. In 2002, he began exploring his spiritual path and awakened his long-dormant ability.

When I met with Scott at his home to get my first-ever psychic reading, I wasn’t sure what to expect. Would there be a crystal ball? Would tarot cards or tea leaves determine my fate? I had many Hollywood stereotypes fueling my expectations. The reality, however, was surprisingly down-to-earth. (Although he could have humored me and worn a gypsy costume just for dramatic effect.)

When I walked in, there was no flashing neon hand in the window that screamed "psychic." Scott, his partner and their dogs welcomed me (the latter with joyous barks from another room). Spa-like music played softly as I was directed to an armchair in the living room, several feet from where he sat; a coffee table with a statue of Buddha separated us.

Within seconds, Scott started to get messages: visions, voices and feelings, just three of the ways a medium gets information. "Hearing" is called clairaudience, feeling is "clairsentience," and seeing is, of course, "clairvoyance."

"Not all psychics are mediums, but generally all mediums are psychic," Scott says. "I am both."

For the first part of the reading, some messages either weren’t correct or couldn’t be corroborated. Though I tried to sit expressionless, he called out my skepticism, which oddly put me at ease.

"There will always be skepticism associated with what I do," Scott says. "It comes with the territory. Most people have questions about the process and how it works. I was a skeptic about it myself even though I had experienced it in my younger years. I have a wonderful partner, Paul, in my life and he supports what I do and is with me every step of the way."

Scott says he can walk into a crowded room and be drawn to certain people, feeling like he has information to give them. A video of one such encounter appears on his Web site; in it, he approaches a woman named Judy in the crowd at one of his gallery events.

"I immediately made a connection with a deceased friend of hers who had passed from brain trauma," he says. "I was feeling the pain in my head. I threw out several messages to Judy. She [later] sent me a very nice e-mail validating just about everything we talked about."

Then, something shocking happened. Scott asked if he could get back to my reading, but worried that it was being recorded — it might get too personal, he said. After I reassured him, his face transformed into a look of deep sorrow and he broke down in tears. He described something extremely personal that happened to me recently. Hello, goose bumps!

From then on, everything he saw, felt and heard was accurate — sometimes so specific that I could hardly pay attention as my mind raced with thoughts of how he could have figured some of this information out. But it was impossible — he knew details I’d never told anyone.

In the end, the experience was like therapy in reverse. Rather than telling him my innermost secrets, he told them to me, and then gave me tools for healing and succeeding.

I finally understand why people find solace and hope visiting psychics. It was far more valuable than I ever anticipated, and even though the skeptic in me is still trying to make rational sense of it, I genuinely believe David Scott has a gift and a passion for helping people.

And there’s nothing evil about that.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition October 2, 2009

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