A star is born

Posted on 16 Sep 2010 at 6:19pm

MyStudio can make a singer out of anyone — even a couch potato

RICH LOPEZ  | Staff Writer lopez@dallasvoice.com

If Lindsay Lohan can piss away a career of fame with no talent, then I should be able to do just the opposite, right? Forget going through the casting couches and reality TV shows to make my mark on Hollywood — I’m hitting up

MyStudio for my break. Because if I can whip out a music video for 20 bucks and be the next big thing, well, then hot damn. Grammy here I come.

The plan is to use modern technology found at the mall to make headway into becoming a fame monster. That means a trip to Grapevine Mills and the new MyStudio HD recording studios. I decided a music video would be right up my alley, considering my singing chops are minimal and I look about as good on video as a mug shot. But I’m determined to bust out some karaoke on some Springsteen in high def brilliance.

Without confidence beyond my solo car concerts, I figured vocalizing and performing tips would be crucial, so I sought advice from Voice of Pride finalists Angie Landers and Robert Olivas. As perennial contestants in the local singing competition, they were fresh from this year’s cycle and flush with suggestions.

“If I’m gonna do a studio song, I need to feel and connect with it,” Landers says. “A big mistake is just not being prepared.”

Not a problem. Especially since MyStudio provides thousands of licensed karaoke tracks, I can just read the words. Olivas echoes Landers.

“I don’t sing it unless I feel it.  First, it has to be within your heart, it has little to do with the vocal cords.”

Sweet! Preparation and great singing voice can be checked off the list. Clearly, this is going to be easier than I thought. I can see the VMA already on my mantle; I can even imagine Kanye ruining my moment.

MyStudio isn’t just for creating karaoke vids. In fact, it’s serious stuff. Green-screen technology, song catalogs, professional studio recording and high def video lets anyone create quality looking work needed for auditions, resumes, modeling, comedy, personal fun — even dating.

And it’s a bargain compared to going through the usual avenues. Up to five minutes sets you back $20. Sure, you might need more to get the results you want, but if you can wrap a video in half an hour, you’ve probably spent way less than forking greenbacks over to a production company.

Landers wants to check my voice out so she leads me through a rendition of “Proud Mary.” After politely not cringing (personally, I’d say I killed it), she had an idea of my vocal range.

“You’re voice isn’t too bad. Just don’t take on anything too challenging,” she says. So, no Celine? “That would be a negative, but if you sang ‘Proud Mary’ you could begin with your slow passionate self and then come out like a diva.”

This is not lost on me. But if I go Tina Turner on the mike, I’ll need some help, and not by another singer. Olivas knows what I mean.

“Liquid courage helps,” he says. “First, know that alcohol can alter your tone and make you flat or sharp. Consider your voice a motor skill. But I have a tradition of taking a shot of tequila before going on.”

And who am I not to respect tradition? If it’s gonna push me through to music glory, I’ll drink whatever I need. Although, I can understand Lindsey’s approach better now.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition September 17, 2010.

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