Sunday TV drinking games for your viewing pleasure

Posted on 08 Jan 2015 at 8:48am

Looking20152This Sunday is chock full of LGBT-favorite TV entertainment. Trying to figure out which one to watch? Our Mikey Rox has devised this drinking game that makes it all the more fun. Choose the game that looks the best for you … of DVR it all and enter rehab on Monday!

The Golden Globes (NBC, 7 p.m.). Take a sip of beer or wine when: 1. Hosts Tina Fey and Amy Poehler change gowns. 2. Music is cued to hurry a lengthy acceptance speech that by that point is probably spilling over into soapbox territory anyway. 3. A winner recognizes his or her same-sex partner by name. Take a shot when: 1. A presenter and/or winner appears visibly drunk or high on stage; the likelihood of this will increase exponentially as each hour passes. Or if Sean Young is invited.  2. An acceptance speech turns into a political speech about freedom of speech. You’ll probably want to pick up a big bottle of tequila this year. 3. North Korea and Sony are mentioned in the same sentence.

Girls (HBO, 8 p.m.). Take a sip of beer or wine when: 1. Hannah bears her breasts. 2. Adam mentions his dick. 3. Somebody rides a bike (because nobody has a driver’s license on this show). Take a shot when: 1. Marnie laments about her music career, or sheds a tear. She’s prone to do both; sometimes simultaneously. 2. One of the girls physically hits another. These chicks are violent, yo. 3. Elijah flashes his sweet cheeks.

Looking (HBO, 8:30 p.m, pictured). Take a sip of beer or wine when:  1. You hear the words “top,” “bottom” or “vers.” 2. They refer to social media and/or dating sites and apps. 3. You see butt. Take a shot when: 1. Richie takes it off. 2. Patrick and Kevin get it on. 3. Somebody can’t get it up.

Downton Abbey (PBS, 8 p.m.). Take a sip of beer or wine when: 1. The Dowager Countess throws shade. 2. Thomas Barrow talks smack. 3. Mary acts like a bitch. Take a shot when: 1. A sexual tryst takes place that transcends the class system. 2. A new invention of the era is introduced. 3. A correspondence containing bad news arrives in the second post.

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