“Pee Wee’s Big Adventure” screens tonight at Texas Theatre

Rebel with a cause

Whether a fan of the TV show or not, Pee Wee Herman’s big screen adventures were always more fun and endearing. In Pee Wee’s Big Adventure, he goes on the hunt for his stolen new bike which turns into cross-country endeavor. As he tracks his bike down, stolen by his arch nemesis Francis Buxton, Herman doesn’t only strive to reclaim his bike, but he helps audiences reclaim a sense of childlike wonder, trust and excitement. Watch it in its glorified 35 mm print.

DEETS: Texas Theatre, 231 W. Jefferson Blvd. 7:15 p.m. $9. TheTexasTheatre.com.

—  Rich Lopez

‘Bedpost Confessions’ tonight at The Kessler

‘Bedpost Confessions’ moves sex talk from the closet into Oak Cliff

What would you do if your friend admitted to  being a prostitute? Or if your sister talked about having sex outside of her marriage with a 21-year-old virgin? Sexual talk outside of the bedroom can still be taboo, even in today’s desensitized world of fast hookups and Showtime melodramas. Bring up intercourse (or something far more intense), and most people will cringe or shy away.

Tonight, it all comes out. The Austin-based stage show Bedpost Confessions features performers talking up their sexual adventures out loud all in good fun. Trying to break away from the taboo of talking about sex, co-founder Sadie Smythe and company bring their show to Dallas. Local writer and Dallas Voice contributor Jenny Block, pictured, gets in on the action which makes perfect sense. As the author of Open: Love, Sex, and Life in an Open Marriage, she’ll have ideal material for the night.

Her thoughts on tonight’s show.

“It’s just sex. It’s supposed to be this happy, fun, sometimes even spiritual experience. It’s all gotten so twisted and tangled when really it should be so simple. Consenting adults doing something that our bodies were built to do. But somewhere along the line, people got confused. Outwardly we are this over-sexed society. But behind closed doors we don’t talk to our kids, we don’t communicate with our partners, and we’re lost when it comes to all things sex. The funny thing is, the fix is an easy one. We have to talk to one another and to our kids and to our partners. We have to strangle the taboo. We could have solved all of the world’s ills by now if we stopped worrying so much about such a natural thing and started putting our brain power to better use.”

We couldn’t have said it better ourselves! Block will also be signing copies of her book after the show. Along with Block, Smythe and the other performers, the audience gets to play as they are encouraged to write their sexual confessions to be read aloud. Don’t worry, it’s all anonymous. Read the original article here.

DEETS:


—  Rich Lopez

GUEST POST: Adventures in Being a Single Gay Parent

The following post comes from Brian Tessier, Esq. in celebration of National Adoption Month. Brian is the President and Chief Executive Officer of We Hear The Children Inc. and a member of the All Children – All Families Advisory Council. This post also appears in the Proud Parenting’s blog.

There are only two things I ever wanted to be in this life, a husband and a father. Now, imagine watching men run for the next county, when you tell them. To shorten a very long story, I decided to become a father as becoming a husband was proving much more difficult. I was beginning to think I had a better chance at pregnancy. So after a period of interviews and navigation through the complex legal and emotional process I got a call on the day before Thanksgiving 2004, telling me that there was a little boy who was two years old.

So begins the saga: In the initial visit with my son, I witnessed a child who was bright, smiled, yelled, stomped his feet and screamed. It was not that he could not talk, he would not talk. He had his own language, created in his mind to get his needs satisfied as a result of them not being met prior. I was told that he could only say 7 words, all in Spanish. I went to a corner on this initial visit and sat there with a book and a stuffed bear and waited. Ever so slowly, he approached me, would touch me and run away and giggle. Eventually, he sat in my lap and looked at me for a while, with his social worker, the foster mother and my adoption worker looking on he put his hand on my face and said “daddy”. This was not one of the words that he knew and it was not in Spanish……so it began.

We finalized the adoption in July of 2005, after paternity leave, teaching him to speak, potty training (I would gladly take any bar exam again to never have to potty train again) where he would sit on the toilet and sing and practice his words when he thought I was out of ear shot. I sat around the corner from the bathroom and cried as I listened to his words, imagination and person come alive. Now, we are deep in the threes and he talks constantly, questions everything and wakes each morning with ‘Love you Daddy” and leaves me each night with what we call a “forever” hug, as he knows I will be his daddy forever. Every night my son picks a book to read, recently he asked for a book with a mommy in it. You are never quite prepared to answer certain questions and despite all my best efforts to be as prepared as possible to counter the mind of a toddler, I am inevitably stumped at times.

We found a book with a mommy in it and climbed into his big boy bed to read. Once in bed, he asked me if he would have a mommy (the lump in my throat and holding back tears) I started that there are families out there who have mommies, daddies, and all various combinations but a family is about all the people who love you. My son started to recite all of the people who are in and who touch both his and my life….the list is rather long but I let him go on. He finished with “all people”, “yes, all people” I said, “Love me” he said, “My family” he stated. I held my son against my chest and he gave me a forever hug, I cried as I heard “love you daddy”.

I am sure this is not the last time I will be asked about this issue, but never did I think I would be asked about it at three. Knowing my son, had I not satisfied his need for an answer he would have pressed me for a better answer. However, in his mind his family is all the people who love him. There is much to be learned from children, I learn daily and for that I am thankful.


Human Rights Campaign | HRC Back Story

—  admin

Pam’s adventures in vlogging…covering stuff you don’t want on the front page (w/a poll)

Hi folks, I’ve never done a vlog before; this is my first one (below the fold). I don’t think I’ll publish many of these on the Blend, so you’ll have to subscribe to my YouTube channel to see when a new one goes up, or follow me on Twitter.

I guess I’ve just thought of vlogging as yet one more thing I’d need to keep up with besides the blog, Facebook and Twitter — all are part of my routine to keep y’all up to date, and all take time to do it right.

In this case, I think vlogging will be a good therapeutic outlet for me as I walk through my ongoing health issues, rather than boring people on this blog. I know it’s my personal blog, but it’s also seen as a resource for political content now more than the former, so I have relegated most personal stuff to the slow-traffic weekends. Besides, writing takes more effort, and I really, really don’t have any more time to squeeze out of the day.

I face a major health decision soon, hence the vlog. More after the jump. TMI alert. Move along to another post if you don’t want to deal with talk of surgery and the like.
So for this first vlog, I figured I do the Cliff Notes version of the backstory by writing up some of what I discuss in the video in a diary, then move it straight to video only.

1. I have uterine fibroids that are wreaking havoc on my quality of life. As non-cancerous tumors, they are often not even a problem for most women (as many as 1 in 5 women have them)- they may not even be aware of them. Unfortunately, in my case, one of the three that could be seen on ultrasound is basically doubling the size of my uterus. My cycles are not only painful, but the amount of bleeding is outlandish in volume and duration.

2. Options: right now it’s down to two choices: a) endometrial ablation (basically burning/eliminating the lining of the uterus – stops your periods, you can no longer have kids) b) hysterectomy: variations of removing your reproductive organs.

3. Complicating factors: I have polycystic ovaries, fibromyalgia, and insulin-dependent, insulin-resistant diabetes. The latter is most relevant regarding higher chances of complications and infection for any surgery.

So if I have more invasive surgery, I may be offline for a while, but I’ll know more after this week, and perhaps I’ll have a date soon.

***

One thing I didn’t mention in the video is my strange weight loss. I have spent most of my adult life dealing with the inability to lose weight. Not yoyo-ing. That would require me taking it off in the first place. Having to take insulin and having PCOS are big factors in making weight loss hard.

Then starting about six months ago, roughly coinciding to the monster inside my uterus growing and really making its presence known, the weight started coming off for no reason. No change in eating habits, no increase or decrease in exercise. I did have less of an appetite more often than before, so perhaps I would skip a meal, but that was never unusual when I was unable to lose weight.

That does not mean that the fibroid has anything to do with this; it just happened around the same time.

Anyway, here I am, 5 sizes smaller, 40 lbs lighter without trying. I’d love to say that’s great news, but when you’re not sure why, that’s a tad disturbing. I’d just like an explanation that makes sense.

***

BTW, someone on Facebook thought it would be a loss not to include the vlogging as front-page entries since health care is a critical issue and I could expound on that in my videos. I told her that I’d put up a poll to see what regulars think. Obviously I don’t think my vlogs will need to be on PHB, but maybe some of you do. Weigh in.
Pam’s House Blend – Front Page

—  John Wright