Great Spaces: There grows the neighborhood

Architect/TV host John Gidding offers tips for multiple-home improvement, or just a single room

By Steven Lindsey

Anyone who owns a home can quickly name the one house on the block that ruins the whole street for everyone. It could be as simple as an unkempt yard or as drastic as broken-down cars perched on cinderblocks on the driveway. Architect and HGTV host John Gidding’s new show, Curb Appeal: The Block, is all about tackling entire groups of homes and building a sense of pride in a community. Fortunately, you don’t have to go on a reality show to benefit from his advice, from ways to improve your own home to getting everyone living around you in on the act.

Taking on the neighborhood

In Curb Appeal: The Block, Gidding is challenged with designing and improving facades on more than one house. Rather than just helping one person make his or her home shine, his job is to upgrade an entire block while staying true to the aesthetics of the homes and rely on historic and contextual cues.

“It makes a big difference when multiple homeowners in a neighborhood feel the benefits of a curb appeal facelift, typically with the side effect that after we leave, those neighbors continue to find ways of beautifying their surroundings and further strengthening those neighborly bonds,” he says.

The biggest culprits for bringing down curb appeal, according to Gidding, are ugly yards, shoddy or unappealing front doors, little regard for quality lighting, lack of color, faltering shutters and gutters and a crooked mailbox.

“A clean yard with well-maintained planting beds and mulched details is all you need in terms of landscaping. Some colorful plants following the path to the front door doesn’t hurt.”

And, he says, if you don’t have a dedicated path to the front door and have people walking up your driveway, you’ve broken Gidding’s No.1 rule: Always have a path to the front door.

“After that it’s about bringing color to the front door to attract attention to the entrance, and then decorating the entrance with a place to sit, a sconce or lighting fixture that matches the metal finishes of the door hardware, and then complementing the entrance colors with accents on the facade like repainting shutters or installing window boxes. It’s really not rocket science, but it can require some color coordination and taste.”

Without a TV crew in tow, people may find it difficult to get their neighbors to feel the need to improve their homes’ curb appeal.

“The most effective grease for this particular wheel is from the elbow. In other words, if you are willing to put in a little work yourself, you’ll be amazed how receptive neighbors can be to chipping in. The worst thing you can do is tell neighbors how to improve their lot or side of the street. You end up fracturing the very fabric that needs to be built up,” he says.

“On the other hand, if you propose a weekend where whoever wants to can join in doing a few projects around the neighborhood, you’ll find more and more people willing to help out. Once that kind of relationship is built up, the sky is the limit for how much improvement a block can affect as a team.”

Increasing your home’s value

“Kitchens and bathrooms are the tried and tested focal points for a successful home renovation,” Gidding says. “Granted, they can be expensive to redo, but invariably the investment comes back in property values. For kitchens, cabinet resurfacing, countertop upgrades, and new appliances are the big-ticket crowd pleasers.”

“For bathrooms, it’s retiling and new fixtures. Both these rooms are slaves to trends, so it’s good to be well versed in what’s new and hot in the market.

One year it’s all about the convection ovens and induction cooktops, and another year it can be about natural cabinet fronts and stone backsplashes. To avoid picking trends that will become dated, always look for low-detail (no multicolored inlays within the backsplash), high-quality (granite and stainless) upgrades.”

When adding value to a home that isn’t for sale, the only difference is the ability to infuse more personality in the renovations. This is a good time to hire a designer and really work on changes that will enhance your lifestyle. Built-ins are a great example, as are custom pieces of furniture that fit within specific nooks in your home. Try to maximize the spaces within your home that aren’t being used optimally. Spaces under the stairs can be reclaimed, breakfast nooks created, offices built into bedroom corners, you get the idea. These are all upgrades that will improve your day-to-day, while still being generally appreciated down the road if you do decide to sell,” he advises.

Prepping your home for sale

Gidding’s first HGTV show was Designed to Sell, a show that helped people transform their homes to sell faster and get a higher price. There are a few projects that anyone can do to make a house more appealing to prospective buyers, including some that don’t cost a thing.

“The single least expensive and most effective strategy isn’t even a design tip. It’s a clutter tip. Get rid of it!” Gidding says. “I’ve found that the homes that stay the shortest amount of time on the market are the ones that have removed about 50 percent of all clothes, belongings, knick knacks and assorted items from their shelves and closets. Some choose to rent a storage unit, some are already in their new homes and smartly move everything but the staging items to it, and others simply call Mom and use an extra bedroom as temporary holding space.”

“I always tell people to make their closets look like they live a charmed life of white shirts, beige pants, and sandals. It’s the lifestyle you’re selling as much as the house, and a cluttered home is possibly the single biggest detractor when selling.”

As far as actual design strategies, the rules are simple.

“Make sure every room is staged to have an identity,” he says. In other words, no guest rooms that are “storage rooms” and no this-dining-room-could-also-be-an-office” spaces. He also advises to use neutral, low-saturation colors on all walls that complement any furniture. Add fresh flowers to the foyer and other appropriate spaces, plant annuals and perennials in the front yard for curb appeal, and make sure the house numbers are appealing and visible.

His most important tip, which goes hand-in-hand with clutter removal is to clean, clean, clean.

“That means within drawers, every bathroom and kitchen surface, under beds, and every nook you think a buyer will not look, but trust me they will. Oh, final tip. If any bathroom has carpeting, be prepared to keep that house on the market for a nice, long time.”

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition April 15, 2011.

—  John Wright

Even CAP’s Winnie Stachelberg, architect of the DADT compromise, is worried about the prospects for DADT

Kerry Eleveld just posted an article on the prospects for legislative action on the DADT language. It’s not good.

Much of what you need to know about the future of ending DADT through the legislative process is summed up in these four paragraphs. See, even Winnie Stachelberg, who concocted the DADT compromise in cahoots with White House Deputy Chief of Staff Jim Messina, is worried. Winnie is the ultimate insider here. The White House relies on her for compromise and cover. But, as you see, Winnie is worried:

“When you actually look at how much time Congress has to be here in lame duck, and the appetite to get difficult bills done, it will be very difficult to move the defense authorization bill,” said Winnie Stachelberg, who is vice president of external affairs at the Center for American Progress and has worked on the repeal effort.

Stachelberg tempered her comments with glimmers of hope, pointing out recent remarks from White House deputy chief of staff Jim Messina, who last week spoke to a group of students at The University of Montana about DADT and said, “We’re going to get that done this year.”

Still, she added, “when you throw in the fact that Secretary [Robert] Gates continues to say the legislation should come after the Pentagon’s working group study, which is due December 1, it’s an unbelievably narrow needle to thread with many competing legislative priorities.”

White House spokesperson Shin Inouye said the administration stood by Messina’s declaration, and forwarded White House press secretary Robert Gibbs’s comments last week that “The President, along with his Administration, will continue to work with the Senate Leadership to achieve a legislative repeal of DADT as outlined in the NDAA this fall.”

I wish we could get Shin, Gibbs or Messina to explain what “continue to work” means. We know the President did practically nothing last week to secure passage of the Defense Authorization bill, which includes the DADT language. The WHite House didn’t make one call to Capitol Hill over the Defense bill, let alone DADT — although he called the WNBA champs. So, if they’re going to “continue to work” they way they’ve been working, we’re getting nothing.

And, if you have any doubts, pay attention to this excerpt in Kerry’s piece. Obama’s pick to head the Marine Corps was on Capitol Hill last week testifying against the stated wishes of his Commander-in-Chief:

The source, who spoke on the condition of anonymity, also echoed concerns about the White House’s ability and will to push this bill through, noting recent testimony from the nominee to become the next commandant of the Marine Corps, General James Amos.

In his written testimony last week, Amos said he opposes changing the law, which he characterized as a “reasonable” compromise.

The source said when the administration preps nominees for a hearing, they usually explicitly tell the nominee not to overtly counter the Commander in Chief.

“That’s rule number one – if you disagree, you do it in private, not in public,” said the source. “[President Lyndon B. Johnson] would have had someone on the guillotine in an hour!”

Amos also foreshadowed what could be a calculated campaign of leaks by repeal detractors at the Department of Defense.

“I’ve heard at the Marine bases and the Marine input for the online survey has been predominantly negative,” he told the Senate Armed Services Committee.

The Senate Democratic aide said that type of intel could entirely skew the results of the working group before the study is even released.

“Once those leaks come out, they will weigh on members,” said the aide, which could begin to peel away moderate Democrats who were already on the fence about repeal.

Still not seeing that fierce advocacy.

And, this again shows the massive failings of our lead advocates, which includes HRC and Winnie Stachelberg (yes, somehow, a person with no LGBT constituency became one of the key players in this debacle. She’s not accountable to anyone in the community — and it showed.) We were constantly reminded that HRC and Stachelberg had the relationships with Messina and the White House — and they all failed us. They’ve done a horrible disservice to the gay and lesbian servicemembers who have put their lives on the line for the rest of us. It sickens me.




AMERICAblog Gay

—  John Wright

Drawing Dallas

Long-locked Luis Infante is a cut above the ordinary

MARK STOKES  | Illustrator mark@markdrawsfunny.com

Luis InfanteDominican style

Name and age: Luis Infante, 18

Spotted at: Salon on Gaston Avenue

Occupation: Hair stylist

Hair apparent: A family affair, Luis’ interest in hair started early while watching his mother, a stylist who always owned her own salon as Luis was growing up. Luis hails from a household of women (he has two older twin sisters, Diana del Rosario and Leidy del Rosario, and a younger sister, Danilca Infante), and he has been cutting hair since he was 11, with a focus on men’s cuts. Born in La Vega, in the Dominican Republic, this sizzlin’ Gemini enjoys playing baseball (he plays third and short), studying and Facebook. His future career dream is to become an architect or a plastic surgeon.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition September 17, 2010.

—  Michael Stephens