“Wise Kids” kicks of Q Cinema’s spring series

Q Cinema’s spring multi-day festival is just around the corner, but you can get a taste of queer cinema with The Wise Kids, February’s monthly screening in Fort Worth, in Wednesday.

The coming-of-age comedy-drama — about three Church kids confronting one’s homosexuality — was an award-winner at the gay OutFest film festival last year. It’s a savvy look at Christianity confronting the real world. Tickets are $10. The screening is at Four Day Weekend Theatre at 312 Houston St. in Cowtown, starting at 8 p.m.

The other films and dates in the spring series are:

• Tomboy on March 28

Kawa on April 25.

For more information, visit QCinema.org.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Brian Stokes Mitchell tonight at the Winspear

Theater king
TITAS brings in Broadway leading man Brian Stokes Mitchell for a one-night engagement. The Tony Award winner performs a night of songs proving he can carry a show well on his own.

DEETS: Winspear Opera House, 2403 Flora St. 8 p.m. $12–$200. TITAS.org.

—  Rich Lopez

BEEFCAKE WEEKEND: Porn stars to pack ‘em in

Samuel Colt, left, and Chris Porter
Ricky Sinz

Maybe you could call it ironic that the weekend before Fat Tuesday, Dallas is being inundated with lots of muscle. It also gives those gays who head down to Cedar Springs something to repent during Lent: Lustful feelings will be top on the list.

Over at The Tin Room, Men magazine’s Man of the Year for 2010, Samuel Colt, pictured top right, joins real-life boyfriend and fellow adult film star Chris Porter, below right, for two nights of booty-shaking deliciousness. They will make a joint appearance starting at 11 p.m. on Friday and Saturday.

Also on Saturday, hot star and multiple GayVN Award winner Ricky Sinz, pictured below, will make his Dallas bow with an appearance at TMC: The Mining Company. You can get your photo taken with the sexy hunk beginning at 11:30 p.m

Samuel Colt and Chris Porter at the Tin Room, 2514 Hudnall St. March 4 and 5, 11 p.m.—2 a.m.

Ricky Sinz at TMC: The Mining Company, 3903 Cedar Springs Road. March 5, 11:30 p.m.

— Arnold Wayne Jones

—  John Wright

A brand new Technicolor life

Country singer Chely Wright, announced this week as BTD’s 2010 Media Award winner, says coming out freed her

RELATED STORY: Congresswoman Tammy Baldwin named keynote speaker

Rich Lopez  |  Staff Writer lopez@dallasvoice.com

Chely Wright
Chely Wright

“Dallas has been a great market for me,” says Chely Wright.

Truer words might have never been spoken.

The country music star spoke highly of the city when referring to her past concerts here, but she’ll be heading to Dallas this year for a different reason — one that will reinforce her confidence in this city.

Officials with the Black Tie Dinner this week announced that Wright has been chosen to receive the 2010 Media Award during the annual fundraising gala set for Nov. 6.

They also announced that U.S. Rep. Tammy Baldwin, the openly lesbian Democrat from Wisconsin, will be the keynote speaker at the dinner.

When Wright came out of the closet in May with her biography, “Like Me,”  the media storm hit full force. She was touted as the first modern country singer to come out of thecloset, and her life story landed her on the cover of People magazine and Oprah.

As the recipient of the Black Tie Media Award, Wright sees it as a step in her reasoning to come out.

“This is noteworthy to be receiving this incredible honor,” she said. “I find it really interesting that this one thing I tried so hard to hide has really set me free. I’ve not only found this gay community but also activist, advocate and civil-minded communities. These are incredible people to be applauded.”

But not only was she setting herself free by coming out, Wright knew that since she was such a public figure, her coming out would facilitate dialogue and education.

Her announcement eclipsed her current album, “Lifted Off the Ground,” and even her career for the past 15 years. But she said she was prepared for that, because it was bigger than just a CD.

“The specific reason I did this in such a grand, comprehensive way was because I was aware this would be discussed,” she said. “As celebrities, we must be aware of our public capital in the community, and there had never been a commercial country artist who acknowledged being gay.

“That’s why I wrote a book, knowing that it was incumbent upon me to do so,” she said.

Along with all that attention came the backlash from both her audiences and the country music industry — no surprise considering it comprises a largely conservative demographic.

Wright said she knew there would be a negative reaction that could possibly put her into “Dixie Chicks vs. Texas” territory. But, she said, the good has outweighed the bad so far.

“I’m aware there are negative comments. No matter what you do, people will hate. On my social networks, we don’t leave them out unless they are overly caustic. We allow that dialogue to happen.

“But I think some of my fans never knew a gay person and thought they were all deviants,” she added. “They see this isn’t the case. Those people are the moveable middle.”

Wright mentions she even received support locally, saying KSCS on-air personality Chris Huff reached out to her after she came out.

To her, that was a step many people in the country music industry are either reluctant to take, or maybe do so quietly.

“Just judging from everything she said and her experiences and the emotions she fought, I think it was a really strong thing that she did,” Huff said. “I can’t imagine what she must’ve gone through the years leading up to that.”

Huff did what, according to Wright, not many have done in her industry. People have reached out to her, but only privately. She said public declarations of support by those in country music are hard to come by.

“Huff was one of the first to e-mail me after coming out.  The industry has a lot of really progressive people, but there are a lot of folks who just reach out privately. All of country music is not homophobic, but people don’t feel like that they can say ‘I’m behind you.’”

So instead, Wright is focusing on the positive support, which she has received from other LGBT celebrities, like Rosie O’Donnell and Lance Bass, and from the fans still coming to get her autograph. She’s even relishing the Prop 8 decision from her West Hollywood home.

But ultimately, she says, she feels simply free.

“Imagine a tiny secret being a big one and have it chasing you around, and you’re afraid. Then, it’s gone. It feels like I’ve retired an 80-hour-a-week job at a factory. There is so much emotional free space.

“I think my life felt like black and white before and now it’s in Technicolor.”

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition August 6, 2010.

—  Michael Stephens