Lindsay as Liz: The latest pix

For all you Lindsay Lohan queens out there, Lifetime just released the latest pix of the Goddess of Train Wrecks playing the Empress of Emotion, Elizabeth Taylor, and I have to say, Linds looks pretty convincing. (And check out those Egyptian slave boys!) Enjoy.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

REVIEW: “The Iron Lady”

The Iron Lady feels like the best TV movie ever. In structure, length, content and technique, it feels much more like an excellent entry into the Masterpiece Theatre canon and a stand-alone feature film. If you go in expecting a sweeping, diaper-to-Depends biopic of Margaret Thatcher, you’re setting yourself up for disappointment; if you think it’ll be like The Queen, focusing on a single incident to illuminate a greater understanding of character, you don’t get that either. Rather, you’re treated to a performance by Meryl Streep so hypnotic that you are unaware you are watching a performance at all. Some roles draw attention to how complete they are; this one oddly doesn’t. It’s just Thatcher, through and through.

That’s reason enough to see the film, which is otherwise a disappointment. We first see Thatcher in her dotage, mistakable for a bag lady, as she drifts in and out of dementia: Forgetting she is no longer prime minister of Great Britain, thinking husband Denis (Jim Broadbent), long-dead, is still with her. But things — radio broadcasts, old suits, everything except a madeleine dipped in tea — trigger her recollections, in surprisingly linear fashion: Her early campaign for Parliament, her development from a shrill housewife in pearls to a deep-throated leader of the Right; her eventually ouster when her bullying reached intolerable proportions, even among her devoted followers.

But aside from broad statements about her beliefs and too many scenes of protestors attacking her limo to show her controversial nature, the film, directed by Phyllida Law (Mamma Mia), is thin on actual politics. In one scene, No. 10 Downing St. is firebombed, nearly killing Maggie and Denis. I recall nothing about this historically, but aside from showing it, the film never even tries to explain it: Was it the IRA or some other group? What exactly about Thatcher’s policies warranted this particular attack? The treatment of such matters is staggeringly superficial. (Her relationship with Reagan is barely mentioned.)

The Iron Lady does do a good job early on at portraying the then-prevailing political hierarchy of England as male-centric — a pond of fleshy-necked bullfrogs bloviating about how things need to be done. Maggie actually did things, not just talk about them, though you’ll learn more details of her politics watching Billy Elliot than this movie.

Still, the hype about Streep is deserved. She’s excellent playing Thatcher from 40s to 80s, showing her micro-managing habits that drove even her children crazy. It’s a sympathetic portrayal not because she’s so nice, but because she’s so human. Iron Lady? No, she was, at heart, still flesh and bone.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Black defends ‘J. Edgar’s’ gay content

Last week, I wrote about a report that Clint Eastwood was getting snippy at questions about the “gay side” of his biopic J. Edgar, about the closeted FBI director. The script was written by Oscar winning writer Dustin Lance Black (right), who has had some success with gay profiles (Milk). Well, now Black goes on the record to the film’s defense. In Next magazine, he says this:

“I wrote this with Ron Howard and Brian Grazer’s Imagine company, and there was never any limitation in terms of where I could or should go except they were very interested in finally figuring out the truth about Hoover. We all wanted to find out what really happened. What was his sexuality. What did it look like. I wanted to get to the truth of his political work and the things that deserve applause and things that were heinous. The gay stuff was only ever going to be a third of it. It’s not Milk, but it’s there. When I finished a draft I liked, and think I got to what the truth is, it’s a story that reflects what gay life was like pre-Stonewall, which was very different from what it looked like for Harvey Milk. That’s the script Clint and the studio read and I’ll tell you what — not only did Clint and the studio never cut or change a word, they never had a note about it. Clint said some things that were so incredibly moving that he understood the struggle young gays go through today. If anything, Clint made it even more human and universal.”

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Clint Eastwood, Leonardo DiCaprio sound like they are about to de-gay Black’s Hoover script

In an interview with GQ, Clint Eastwood and Leonardo DiCaprio under-emphasize the gay aspect of tyrannical FBI director J. Edgar Hoover’s reign in their upcoming biopic, J. Edgar, E Online is reporting. Considering that its screenwriter, Dustin Lance Black, won an Oscar for his screenplay to another gay bio, Milk, their comments sound very disrespectful. Sigh. Well, we still plan to see it. It comes out Nov. 9.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Franco May Do Porno Biopic

JAMES FRANCO X390 (GETTY) | ADVOCATE.COMJames Franco is in talks to reteam with Rob Epstein and Jeffrey Friedman, the out creative duo behind the acclaimed Howl, on a film biography of Deep Throat star Linda Lovelace.
Advocate.com: Daily News

—  admin

Rourke Confirms Gareth Thomas Biopic

MICKEY ROURKE GARETH THOMAS X390Oscar nominee Mickey Rourke confirmed on a British talk show that he
will play gay rugby player Gareth Thomas in an upcoming biopic.
Advocate.com: Daily News

—  admin

Sal Mineo Biopic for Franco

SAL MINEO X390 | ADVOCATE.COMThe life and tragic, mystery-shrouded death of 1950s teen idol Sal Mineo could become a film for James Franco, who has purchased rights to a new biography of the late actor.
Advocate.com: Daily News

—  admin

Bardot Condemns Plans for Biopic

Brigitte Bardot, the quondam French femme fatale with a history of
racist and homophobic remarks, warns that “sparks will fly” if plans for a
biographical film move forward.
Daily News

—  John Wright