Art attack

Dallas gets a dose of queer and queer-friendly art options this month

Maybe the holiday season inspires artists or inspires buyers, but whichever the reason, Dallas’ art scene is in full bloom with openings, closings and anniversaries. These galleries are ready to introduce you to a world of art in your own backyard.

Local queer artist Robb Conover closes his pop art extravaganza Sweet Bullets at Kettle Art Friday. Conover curated the show with fellow artist Corey Godfrey, which includes work by Tony Reans, Nix Johnson, Daniel Birdsong, Conover and Godfrey and more. Expect an explosion of bold colors and pop culture references in this eclectic exhibit. Upon the closing of the show, the gallery will celebrate its seventh anniversary. Kettle Art, 2714 Elm St. KettleArt.com.

Local funny gay guy Dave Cudlipp debuts as an artist in Fresh Faces 2 x 2. Curator Rita Barnard’s goal of the show is to highlight local and regional artists both discovered and yet to be. Cudlipp, who we featured before as a writer for Dallas Comedy Conspiracy, shows his other talents in the exhibit where artists are required to get creative in a two by two inch space. Bath House Cultural Center, 521 E. Lawther Drive. Through Jan. 28 with an artists’ reception Dec. 3 at 7 p.m. 214-670-8749. BathHouseCultural.com.

The Dallas Museum of Art continues it’s stunning exhibit The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier: From the Sidewalk to the Catwalk, featuring the designer’s edgy clothes over the years as well as added elements such as animatronic mannequins — including one of Gaultier himself. Dallas Museum of Art, 1717 N. Harwood St. Through Feb. 12. $16–$20. DallasMuseumofArt.org.

Alison Jardine displays her work, pictured, in PixelNation at Ro2 Art gallery at the Aloft. The digital art works are the result of Jardine creating through her iPad for 365 consecutive days. With such a modern approach, Jardine ironically takes on nature as her theme with a pixel motif. Ro2Art at Aloft, 1033 Young St. Through Dec. 29 with an artist’s reception Dec. 2 at 7 p.m. 214-803-9575. Ro2Art.com.

The Downtown gallery of Ro2Art will simultaneously feature Dallas-based artist R. Mateo Diago’s work in Every Then … and Now. The exhibit includes works from an array of media such as photography, painting, found objects and even letters and notes. Diago’s work is described as giving weight to themes of lost loves, self-identity, dreams and sexual compulsion. Sounds like his work speaks to everybody. Ro2 Art, 110 N. Akard St. Dec. 17–Jan. 28 with an artist’s reception Dec. 17. 214-803-9575. Ro2Art.com.

Applying math and musical concepts in his work, Dallas-based Rusty Scruby takes his photographic work to a new level. In Memory Bytes, Scruby hand cuts and reassembles his works into constructions of hexagons and circles in a simulated knitting style. Taking the seemingly mundane, he transforms family photos, yearbook pictures and more into further dimensions that demand a deeper look. Cris Worley Fine Arts, 2277 Monitor St. Through Dec. 22. 214-641-9266. CrisWorley.com.

The works of British artist Nigel Cooke can either bring forth a sense of renewal or evoke a feeling of dread. Either way it can be fascinating in his art currently on display at the Goss-Michael Foundation. 1405 Turtle Creek Blvd. Through Feb. 18. 214-696-0555. GossMichaelFoundation.org.

— Rich Lopez

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition December 2, 2011.

—  Kevin Thomas

Robb Conover opens new Pop (exploration) art show at Kettle Art in Deep Ellum

Tonight, queer artist Robb Conover makes a colorful statement with the opening of Sweet Bullets, the exhibit he curated for Kettle Art. The show features local artists Corey Godfrey, Dan Colcer, Daniel Birdsong, Tony Reans, Nix Johnson and Conover himself. Your likely to see a whole lot of bold colors, but he tells Kettle Art’s blog that it’s not just a Pop art show. From Kettle Art:

“We wanted a Pop edge without the show being completely POP. So, the name “Sweet Bullets” was coined by Corey. To me, its art that is fun and intense; as fast as a bullet traveling across the room and just as peaceful and sweet at the same time. We wanted to give Kettle-ites a new feeling of adventure after leaving the show. We want the audience to experience a journey that the walls at Kettle have never seen.”

Read more of what Conover tells Kettle here and see some of the works that will be on display through Dec. 10.Kettle Art is located at 2714 Elm St. The opening starts at 7 p.m.

—  Rich Lopez