QLive! holds auditions for stage version of “Mulligans”

Mulligans was one of the more charming and poignant gay independent movies to come out in recent years —  a summer romance between a young man and his friend’s father ends in heartbreak. The screenplay was written by actor Charlie David, who appeared on Dante’s Cove and hosts the travel series Bump! Now David has adapted it for the stage, and QLive! (the theatrical arm of Fort Worth’s Q Cinema) is putting it on.

A staged reading of the adaptation will be part of QLive’s June lineup, and the group will be holding auditions for the six roles — two men in their early 20s, a man in his 40s, a woman in her 40s, a girl in her early 20s and an 8-year-old girl — on March 31 at the Celebration Community Church, 908 Pennsylvania Ave. from 2 to 5 p.m. To find out more, visit QCinema.org.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Bump & Grind it at the Brick

Sometimes you just need a stripper

—  Rich Lopez

Little crooked house • Defining Homes

Don’t get tripped up on uneven floors before buying that new home

By M. ­­M. Adjarian

After a long stretch of searching, finding that perfect house is not only a relief, it’s a glimpse into a whole new future. When the pieces fall together, such as location, price and a great neighborhood, you might pinch yourself thinking “Is this too good to be true?” The idealism in it’s close proximity to work, school, shopping and the big yard for the dogs is shaded by beautiful trees might give the impression that this really is home sweet home.

But you keep hitting your foot on that little bump in the floor. Before you think it’s just the character of the house, give it another look and then have a professional take a gander. There could be more to that misstep than you think.

“If there is unevenness in the beginning,” Brian Mulvehill warns, “between heat and contraction and all other issues, it’s only going to get worse over time.”

As the Fort Worth-based owner of Carpet Direct, Mulvehill knows his floors, and uneven ones can slip through the buying process if one doesn’t take a close eye to the walk-throughs. For instance take a look at where the floor meets the baseboard and if you see gaps; those will indicate uneven floors.

Once a floor starts to warp, one of two things will eventually happen. The floor will either pull away from the house walls or start pushing against them. Neither scenario is especially desirable, but when the floor pushes against the walls, it’s also pushing against molding and drywall, which could get messy — and expensive.

“Once drywall starts to crack, or moisture gets into the drywall, then you’ve got big structural issues,” says Mulvehill.

Regardless of whether the flooring is wood, tile, laminate or carpet, warping problems usually have to do with the installation — something to which a potential homebuyer will not have been privy. Reputable installers should be licensed and come with a good reputation and references. That person should always check the slab or sub-floor before laying any material on top of it. A problem with either indicates a need for structural rebuilding, which could cost thousands of dollars. More typically, though, the problem will arise from the quality of the materials actually used.

“One of the big things a buyer should know is [to] ask the potential home seller what the floor is made of,” advises Mulvehill.

He notes that if the floor is made from cheaper imported wood, chances are that’s why it’s uneven. “You can take a plank out of a box coming in from China, and just twist it. It will actually warp in your hand.”

If faulty building materials are to blame for uneven floors, a potential homebuyer could have them repaired through a procedure called floating,which usually runs about $200 per 1,000 square feet floated. A contractor will pour concrete-like material under the affected areas to raise them up so they are level with the rest of the floor.

So exactly how can a homebuyer tell whether floors are level are to begin with?

“It might sound crazy,” says Mulvehill, “but just get down on one side of the floor and just look across.”

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition of Defining Homes Magazine October 8, 2010.

—  Michael Stephens

WATCH: Logo’s ‘Bump’ highlights Dallas

Wednesday night (and again Thursday morning), Logo aired an episode of the travel series Bump! that profiled Dallas. And Dallas looked damn good in it. Of course, anything near host Charlie David is bound to bask in his reflected beauty, but still.

The episode, which was filmed during last year’s Pride Weekend, painted the well-rounded portrait of gay Dallas we know to be the reality. Yes, they hit the Round-Up Saloon with the two-stepping queerboys, but we also got interviews with drag diva Wayne Smith and mayoral chief of staff Chris Heinbaugh; a scrimmage with gay rugby players the Dallas Diablos, pictured; and a session with NOH8 creator Adam Bouska, who picked Dallas as his first locale outside California. Plus there were scenes of the parade, a stop by Blythe Beck’s kitchen at Central 214 and other things that set Dallas apart. (The ep was actually screened at a preview party last week at the ilume, which got plenty of good press as well.)

The episode is set to re-air next week. Take a look, and see how gay America sees Big D.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Logo’s ‘Bump!’ features Dallas

Resource Center Dallas reports on Facebook that Logo’s “Bump!” was scheduled to feature Big D on Wednesday night. Logo crews were at RCD’s “the Five Factor” and Gaybingo Dallas last fall. Filmmaker Robert Camina says the episode was also to include Michael DiQuinzio, Rodd Gray, Hungdinger, Wayne Smith as Cher, ilume, Derrick Brown, Station 4, the Round-Up, Sue Ellens, the Tin Room, Hotel Palomar, Woody’s, JR.’s and the Dallas Diablos. Wow!

According to the Logo website, the show was scheduled to air at 6 p.m. local time and again at  10:30 a.m. Thursday. In case you’re not familiar, here’s a description of the show:

Join hosts Charlie David (Dante’s Cove), and Shannon McDonough as they tour the world in search of the most fascinating and engaging destinations for LGBT travelers. Every episode showcases a different gay-friendly city and all the fun and stylish activities they offer.

—  John Wright