‘Carrie’ star Chloe Grace Moretz: The (spooky) gay interview

Chloe Moretz;Julianne Moore

Julianne Moore and Chloe Moretz

With Halloween just days away, our Chris Azzopardi decided to chat with Carrie star Chloe Grace Moretz — about gay brothers, a queer take on a classic and not being a lesbian.

We might not have telekinetic powers, but the gay community knows what it’s like to be Carrie. We know the torment from kids at school. We know the pressure from parents to change who we are.

It only makes sense, then, that a lesbian filmmaker — Boys Don’t Cry writer/director Kimberly Peirce — give her spin on Stephen King’s creepy classic, first adapted to screen in 1976 with Sissy Spacek in the titular role.

The reboot (which we reviewed here) stars 16-year-old Chloë Grace Moretz as Carrie White, the teen with the power to move people — literally. (Julianne Moore plays her intensely religious mother.) We caught up with Moretz to chat about her gay brothers inspiring this take on the iconic character, the queerness of Peirce’s reimagining and why people think the actress is a lesbian (but shouldn’t).

Dallas Voice: As if you weren’t cool enough, you recently told the press that you stuck up for your brothers when they were being teased for being gay.  Moretz: Aww, thank you. People say that, but I don’t even do it to have that effect. I do it because I know what’s right, and I know what’s wrong, and I grew up with my two gay brothers who were completely ostracized and manipulated into thinking what they were feeling, from the time they were born, was wrong and sinful and potentially life-threatening. That’s so aggravating to think about that when someone can, you know, smoke their entire life and people would never judge them. But just because you choose to be with the same sex, people can be a little cagey.

How much of your brothers’ personal experiences became a part of your experience on Carrie? Did you have them in mind while you were playing her?  Yeah, of course. Whenever you play a character that is going through certain things and you can, in some way, understand them even more — when you have a personal aspect that can actually relate to the — then it takes [the role] to a whole other level, because you’ve seen it and you’ve experienced it.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Good Christian belle

Gay ally Kristin Chenoweth talks about her new country music CD (she adores Dolly!), queers … and the right way to be a Christian

THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO KRISTIN | The performer has conquered stage, recording, TV … and uniting gay rights with her faith.

Kristin Chenoweth doesn’t get miffed very easily. But when she does, watch out. Last year, after Newsweek published a commentary on the inability of gay actors to play straight roles, she wrote an extensive letter to the magazine, calling the article “horrendously homophobic.”

But Chenoweth’s allegiance to the gay community goes back to growing up in Oklahoma — a place she returned to for her latest album, Some Lessons Learned, the first of four where the opera-trainer singer fully embraces her country roots.

We had lots to talk about when we caught up with Chenoweth, on a dinner break from shooting her upcoming series, Good Christian Belles. She discussed her history of dating gay men, her opinion on Michele Bachmann’s support of gay conversion clinics … and being a little bit wicked.

— Chris Azzopardi

………………………..

Dallas Voice: Your character’s name on Good Christian Belles is Cockburn — Carlene Cockburn. Chenoweth: I can’t wait for my family to hear that one. Are you kidding? I was like, “Wait a minute…!” But I just think the most important thing for me as an actress, because of the lines that come out of my mouth, is to just have to speak them and keep going, because they’re so funny and her name is so funny and the whole thing is just so great. I love it.

Does your character have anything in common with April Rhodes, who you play on Glee? Probably not on paper, but they’re both pretty outlandish people. Carlene, though, is the antithesis of April.

You grew up in Oklahoma, so country music is your roots. How is your new album a reflection of that? It’s so funny, because I get asked, “Why a country album now?” But that’s how it all began for me. Of course, why would anyone know that? It’s not something I’ve been talking about a lot, but it’s the music I grew up listening to. One of my biggest influences is Dolly Parton, and when you look at the history of songs in musical theater and in country, they’re both usually great storytellers.

I know just how lucky I am to do this kind of music. Getting to go to Nashville and sing this music that feels like home to me was a real gift, and one that I don’t take lightly.

The song “What Would Dolly Do?” reminds me a lot of Dolly herself. I co-wrote that. [Producer] Bob Ezrin asked, “Who’s had the biggest influence on you country music-wise?” I said, “Dolly, without question.” And he said, “How would she approach it? Let’s think: What would Dolly do?” I said, “Bob, why aren’t we writing that song?”

There’s something about her that I feel very attuned to. There’s only one Dolly. I’m not comparing myself, but I’m just saying her spirit and the way she looks at life is pretty similar to me. And the cover I did of hers [“Change”] is actually a very emotional thing and it reminded me — of course, how could I ever forget? — what an amazing songwriter she is. You know, I didn’t do a lot of covers. I did two covers, one of Carrie [Underwood] and one of Dolly’s, and I just love both of them. I love their music, I love their spirit — everything they stand for.

It makes total sense, because, to me, both you and Dolly epitomize happiness. Oh my god, thank you. That’s the biggest compliment you could give me.

So, being so happy… what pisses you off? Oh, gosh! I don’t really get mad that often. But I’m not going to lie: When I do, there’s a quiet that comes over me that is a little like whoa, and that happens when I don’t feel other people are prepared or doing their job or pulling their weight. I come from a family where my dad came from nothing and worked hard to get where he is, and he said, “Work hard, play hard, Kris,” and I guess that’s kind of been my motto in life. So when I see people squandering opportunities or having a sense of entitlement, that really makes me crazy. Because I don’t understand it. It’s not a world I get.

One thing that does make you upset is homophobic people. I don’t like that, you’re right.

Your letter in response to that Newsweek column said it all. Why was it important to address your feelings on that issue? To be honest, I wasn’t prepared for what was going to happen. I was on Broadway doing Promises, Promises, and I read the article and I actually thought it was pretty irresponsible. I’m not even talking about whether a person agrees with being gay or not, I’m talking about artistry and gay

actors trying to play straight. It just made me mad, because I thought, “Well, I’ve played a prostitute, does that mean I am one? No.” I just thought it was a little bit of a bullying thing, and I honestly prayed about it — no kidding, I prayed about it.

And by the way, I’m a big fan of the magazine, which is why I was so bummed. But I think that they felt bad and hopefully there’s been some discussion about it and some learning, because that’s what we’re here to do on this Earth, to learn our purpose. Well, one of my purposes in this life — since I’m a believer and a Christian — is to help people realize that not every Christian thinks that being gay is a sin.

To reinforce your point, you made out with your Promises, Promises co-star Sean Hayes at the Tonys last year. It might’ve been a little jibe. It might’ve been a little one! Ha!

What was it like to make out with a gay man? Was that your first time? Well, let’s face it, my high school boyfriend is gay, so I don’t think it’s my first time making out with gay men! I bet a lot of women don’t even know they’ve done it! And Sean Hayes is just a darn good kisser, what can I say?

Wait, so you dated a gay man in high school? Yeah, and I’m like, “Well, that’s why we were such a great couple!” He didn’t pleasure me in any way but he helped me pick out my prom dress!

Was he one of the first gay people you knew in Oklahoma? Yeah. I want to tell you something I know about myself: When I was in the second or third grade, I first heard the word “dyke,” and it was in reference to a girl in our school who was very, very tomboyish. I didn’t really understand what the word was, but I knew I didn’t like the way it was said. And for some reason I’ve always been drawn to the person that was alone, and I don’t mean to make me sound like I’m Mother Teresa, because I’m not. But I’ve always been drawn to people who felt left out or different, and maybe it’s because, I too, felt different and unique. People would not think this of me, because there’s this perception of me that, “Oh, life’s been perfect and things have come so easily.”

But let’s face it: My speaking voice is very interesting. Yes, I was a cheerleader but I also wanted to do all the plays, I was in renaissance choir, and, I too, felt a little bit like an outsider. I was always drawn to people who felt that way, too. And sure, some of them were gay and I never did understand — I guess the word is fear.

God made us all equal. He made me short, he made someone gay, he made someone tall — whatever it is, it’s not a sin; it’s how we’re made. And that’s the way I feel about it. It flies in the face of a lot of what Christians believe, but as I’m finding out there’s a lot of Christian people who think the same as me. So that’s my deal, and I think we should not be careful of the unknown but rather accepting and loving of it.

As someone who’s Christian and supports the gay community, how do you feel about the pray-away-the-gay program that Michele Bachmann supports? [Long pause] You know what, you can have your opinion. One of the great things about being in this country is we get to freely say what we believe. I just don’t happen to agree with that. Though I like the “pray” part!

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition September 16, 2011.

—  Michael Stephens

Carrie Goldman Wouldn’t Let A Bunch Of Boys Bully Daughter Katie Into Abandoning Her Love of Star Wars

Crossing normative gender lines isn't merely the territory of little boys: little girls enjoy screwing with society too! Seven-year-old Katie Goldman, a first-grader in Evanston, Illinois, wears her love for Star Wars on her sleeve. And the water bottle and backpack she took to school every day, selected at Target during back-to-school shopping. All of which meant the boys in her class would tease and torment her for liking a film franchise that, apparently, is the exclusive property of male twerps. So when it all became too much for Katie, she told her mom Carrie she wanted to bring a pink water bottle to school from now on. Oh hell no: Carrie wasn't having it.

CONTINUED »


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Queerty

—  admin

News: Polari, Carrie Fisher, Bernie Madoff, Ke$ha

 road The language Polari, which was once used by gays in the United Kingdom, might go the way of the dinosaurs.

K  road Billboard magazine celebrates Ke$ha's big year.

 road Carrie Fisher on the gay rumors surrounding John Travolta: "I mean, my feeling about John has always been that we know and we don’t care. Look, I’m sorry that he’s uncomfortable with it, and that’s all I can say. It only draws more attention to it when you make that kind of legal fuss. Just leave it be."

 road Tonsillitis shuts down the Glee set.

 road The attention-seeking Westboro Baptist Church picketed today's funeral of Elizabeth Edwards. She was eulogized by her daughter and a couple of long-time friends but not John Edwards.

 road Showgirls and Black Swan get the trailer mash-up treatment (nsfw).

 road One dead, two injured in Stockholm bombing.

 road The Thor movie trailer officially hits the Web.

Santa  road Christmas came early in Boston today: spectators were treated to runners dressed in nothing but Santa hats and speedos.

 road Chances are that Winona Ryder is not reading this right now.

 road Bernie Madoff's 46-year-old son has taken his own life – on the two year anniversary of his father's arrest.

 road Bill O'Reilly offends Barbara Walters by implying she's nothing but a celebrity journalist.

 road The Canadian Broadcast Standards Council finds that evangelical TV host Charles McVety violated broadcast code: “McVety may not like homosexuality. That is his entitlement, but to leave the totally unsubstantiated impression that gay and lesbian adults have a predilection toward young, underage people is insidious and unacceptable. In all, the Panel finds the McVety mis-characterizations as excessive, inappropriate, disparaging, and abusive.”

 road Tom Ford has no problem watching straight porn.


Towleroad News #gay

—  admin

Query • 11.19.10

What are you thankful for this year?

…………………….

Carrie Kouri — “I am thankful this year for having such wonderful friends and a loving family in my life!”

Joe S. Hoselton — “GLAAD…without which we might not be on DVD.”

Carl Smith — “I’m thankful to live in a country where the only thing that can hold me back is myself.”

Ty Pressley — “Friends who can make me laugh no matter how bad my day has been.”

Myrna Roy Collins — “My life partner, my daughters, my granddaughter, my aunts and my mom, and last but surely not least, all my friends.”

Kevin White — “I’m thankful that, as a community nationwide, we are standing up loud and clear against the torment bullying has caused so many children just because they are gay.”

……………………..

Have a suggestion for a question you’d like us to ask?
E-mail it to nash@dallasvoice.com.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition November 19, 2010.

—  Michael Stephens