Which local made Star mag’s worst dressed list?

The cover of the April 9 issue of the tabloid Star laments the fate of Khloe Kardashian and Dallas Maverick Lamar Odom, so a couple of “locals” made it to the front cover, but skip that and flip to a few pages in to the worst of the week section.

—  Rich Lopez

Uh, no … this doesn’t really interest me …

This is the intro to a press release I just received. What amazes me is how unamazing this disclosure is… doesn’t everybody?

What do celebrities Kim Kardashian, Matthew McConaughey, Nicolas Cage and Raquel Welch all have in common? They all have either recently purchased or are selling their homes — and each of their homes have wood flooring. If this is something that is of interest to you, the full press release is below.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Takei, Gaga urge fans via Twitter to help with relief efforts for Japan

In the wake of the devastating earthquake and tsunami disasters in Japan, celebrities are already jumping on board to help. Lady Gaga posted a tweet earlier this afternoon encouraging fans to buy her prayer bracelet with all the proceeds going to relief efforts.

Click here to order.

Gay Japanese actor George Takei has also taken to tweeting about the catastrophic events using the poignant hashtag #TodayWeAreAllJapanese and encouraging his followers to donate to the Red Cross.

Click here to follow Takei’s link to the Red Cross.

—  Rich Lopez

Celebrities ‘Die’ Temporary Twitter, Facebook Deaths in World AIDS Day Campaign

Kardashian

Dying for attention (to AIDS).

Mashable writes:

Millions of people will be deprived of their favorite celebrity musings later this week as the likes of Lady Gaga, Justin Timberlake and Ryan Seacrest go dark on Twitter and Facebook. The silence will only be temporary, however, as it’s part of a million fundraiser for World AIDS Day, which takes place December 1.

The project was organized by Alicia Keys on behalf of her charity Keep a Child Alive. According to the Associated Press, the celebs — which also include Kim and Khloe Kardashian, Jennifer Hudson and Serena Williams — will remain silent in the social media universe until the charity raises million.

The effort will be further supported by dramatic videos featuring the celebs in what the AP describes as “lying in coffins to represent what the campaign calls their digital deaths.” Presumably, those videos will be tweeted out before the celebs sign off to raise awareness.

Dlisted thinks the campaign got it all wrong: "This is NOT how you do it. If Alicia really wants all of us to turn our PayPal pocketbooks upside down and shake the cash into her hands, she should've promised us that Kim will stay off of Twitter forever once million is raised. Where was Don Draper when Alicia really needed him?!"


Towleroad News #gay

—  admin

A note on gay Pride — in and out of the community

I had an annoying conversation this morning.

A publicist for a troupe we (let’s put it this way) “recently profiled” called to ask for a change online to the story: Seems like we referred in the headline to the person we interviewed as “gay.” She wanted it removed.

“I’m sorry — is that not true?” I asked.

“No, it’s true. He’s gay.  He would just prefer you not mention it.”

The conversation continued like this for a long time.

Now, I’m happy to correct errors, especially ones caused by us. But this person was pitched to me as the “gay head of this troupe,” and I assigned the story accordingly. If he had not been gay … well, let’s just say the troupe was not on my radar enough such that I would have been all that interested in the story without a hook, an angle. That was his.

Part of the mission of this newspaper is to draw our readers (many of whom are straight) to what’s going on in and by the gay community. Sometimes it’s homophobes attacking us and our rights. Sometimes it’s our allies who embrace us for who we are and treat up as equals. Sometimes it’s just celebrities who have an interesting perspective on their gay fans. Sometimes it’s openly gay people who are victimized by bigots, or leaders who step up to improve the lot of the community.

But a lot of the time, it’s just ordinary gay folks doing something out in the world we think people might want to know about. A trans woman who continues to be a personal trainer. A musician who wants to save the Great American Songbook. An auto mechanic who runs a garage and offers his gay clientele a friendly environment. An actor who steals the show in a national tour of a terrible musical. A museum curator who brings his unique perspective to a major art museum. Maybe being gay doesn’t directly affect what they do too much. But maybe it does. And it’s good to have a sense of pride knowing the vast landscape of opportunities out there — and that being openly gay, bi or trans is not a hindrance to success.

So when someone who is gay — and claims to be out — asks me to hide that fact … well, it angers me. You don’t need to do an interview with me. You don’t need to discuss your sexuality if you do agree to the interview. You don’t even need to be gay for me to write about you. But don’t come to me with the pitch that our readers might be interested in reading about you and then leap back in the closet. Because there are a lot of people out there proud to be called gay. I’m one of them.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

NoH8 takes on bullying, with the help of Cindy McCain

Way back in January, I posted this piece about Cindy McCain, wife of anti-gay Arizona senator and failed presidential candidate John McCain, participating in the NoH8 campaign in support of same-sex marriage. The McCains’ daughter Meghan also posed for a photo in the NoH8 campaign and has been outspoken in her support of same-sex marriage and LGBT rights in general.

Now comes this video about bullying from NoH8, and once again Cindy McCain is speaking out.

The video includes appearances by a long list of celebrities (including another of my favorite blondes, Bridget Marquadt of Girls Next Door fame) who are all talking about how serious bullying is and how everyone needs to step up and do their part to end the epidemic. I was especially impressed by what Cindy McCain said about how anti-gay laws — things like “don’t ask, don’t tell” and the Defense of Marriage Act — are also a form of bullying and must end, along with religious persecution of LGBT people.

Makes me wonder how tense the situation must be right now in the McCain household, since John McCain supports both DADT and DOMA.

Anyway, let’s hear a cheer, once again, for Cindy McCain and all the others who took the time to participate in this video and make a stand for our rights — and our lives. And check out this “It Gets Better” PSA No H8 did, that includes Meghan McCain, Tori Spelling, Pauly Perrett and many others.

—  admin

WATCH: Secretary of State Hillary Clinton records ‘It Gets Better’ video message

Most of the celebrities joining the “It Gets Better” campaign and posting their videos online are openly LGBT people. But now, U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has added her voice to the call for LGBT young people contemplating suicide to hang on because brighter days are ahead.

Here’s Secretary Clinton’s video, “Tomorrow Will Be Better.” Now I wonder when we will see a video from President Barack Obama, or perhaps from First Lady Michelle Obama? The president is our “fierce advocate,” after all.

—  admin

Daniel Radcliffe speaks out on teen suicides in PSA for The Trevor Project

Lots of celebrities have been speaking out over the past week or so on the subject of the teens who have killed themselves after being bullied. Daniel Radcliffe, star of the Harry Potter film series, has added his voice to the discussion in the form of a public service announcement for The Trevor Project, a national 24-hour, toll free confidential suicide hotline for gay and questioning youth.

Because I am a Harry Potter fan, I am sharing Radcliffe’s video here:

—  admin

Celebrities Combat Anti-Gay Bullying On ‘Larry King’

<Gaylkl

Larry King dedicated his entire CNN show to homophobic bullying last night, and invited gay celebrities like Lance Bass, Chely Wright, Tim Gunn and Nate Berkus to share their stories.

Bass admitted that he used laugh along while his friends taunted gay classmates. "When you're 13, 14, you just go along with what the other people are doing. You just want to fit in. You want to make sure that your friends like you," the singer confessed. "You're going to crack jokes, you're going to laugh along with it. And when you're a teenager, you're not really thinking, oh, I'm being a bully by laughing along with it… But you know, you're also a bully by condoning the behavior and making the jokes along with them."

Meanwhile, Berkus verbalized the isolation of living in the closet, unsure of what "gay" even means: "You are trying to hide a fundamental part of yourself, what happens is that you cannot focus on anything else. Please understand, too, there was no Youtube. There were no — there was no Internet, nothing like that, when I was growing up."

Wanda Sykes also made an appearance, and tied the rise of anti-gay bullying to homophobic legislation, like Don't Ask, Don't Tell. "I believe that it is assisting," she said. "I'm not going to say that that's… the crux of it, because this has been going on for decades. But I think maybe what's making people a little more vocal… is because of issues that — like Don't Ask, Don't Tell and Prop 8. They're so much in the forefront right now of politics that maybe that's, you know, causing people to do more harm."
 
At the end of it all, gay favorite Kathy Griffin reminded viewers that they're not alone, and that our collective efforts can put an end to bullying: "If you're watching this at home and you feel enraged but helpless, you can help. All right, come see me at the Gibson Theater. Make a monetary donation. Come get a pamphlet. Sign up for the Trevor Project. Sign up for Give a Damn. Go talk to somebody."

I've included the entire episode AFTER THE JUMP…



Towleroad News #gay

—  John Wright