Chorale to hold free ‘healing’ concert Tuesday at COH

5-Sean-Baugh-TCC-by-HHenley-copyOn Saturday night, the Turtle Creek Chorale thought it had held its final concert of the season. It was the third consecutive presentation of Heartstrings, which celebrated love (and included nightly weddings of actual same-sex couples).

But the chorale’s work is not quite done — and for all the wrong reasons.

Following the tragedy in Orlando, TCC artistic director Sean Baugh has announced he will lead members of Dallas’ gay men’s chorus in a free concert Tuesday night. Songs for Healing will be a tribute and memorial “to help bring hope and healing in response to the deadliest mass shooting ever to occur.”

“This irrational and cruel act of terrorism strikes deeply at the very core of our community,” Baugh said. “This impact is horrible throughout our city, our state and our world. We must do what we do best — heal with the power of song — to blunt this pathetic act.”

The concert will include songs recently performed for Heartstrings, as well as a preview of some planned for the GALA Choruses Festival to be held in Denver in July.

It will take place in the sanctuary of the Cathedral of Hope, 5910 Cedar Springs Road, starting at 7 p.m. Tuesday. Admission is free.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Tickets go on sale Friday for September Kraftwerk concert in Dallas

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Kraftwerk’s 3-D Concerts tour comes to Dallas in September. (Photo by Peter Boettcher/Kraftwerk

Back in the early 1980s, Kraftwerk was one of my favorite bands (although “band” isn’t really the right word, I guess). I had the cassette of the album Computer World (listen below) and I played it til it fell apart.

Although Ralf Hütter and Florian Schneider started their Kraftwerk Project in Dusseldorf, Germany in 1970 and had gained international recognition by the mid-70s, when I discovered the music, I didn’t know too many people who knew who/what Kraftwerk was, and fewer who shared my enthusiasm for their music.

These days, I spend most of my music-listening time tuned to my “Willie Nelson Station” on Pandora radio. But I still love breaking out the old Kraftwerk tunes every now and then. So I was kind of excited when I found a press release in my email inbox letting me know that the band will bring their 3-D Concerts Tour to Dallas in September.

Tickets go on sale Friday, April 29, at 10 a.m. at TheBombFactory.com for the show set for Saturday, Sept. 10 (at the Bomb Factory, of course).

This year’s nine-city U.S. tour brings back the 3-D Concerts show that won rave reviews last year, hyped as much as an art show as a musical concert. The tour starts Sept. 3 in Baltimore, then heads to Atlanta, Memphis and New Orleans before coming to Dallas. After the Dallas show, Kraftwerk heads to San Antonio, Phoenix and San Diego before wrapping up Sept. 18 in Los Angeles.

(Tickets for all the shows except the final one in L.A. go on sale this Friday.)

—  Tammye Nash

Gwen Stefani tour coming to Gexa Pavilion

Gwen22016Gwen Stefani — whom we interviewed here and whose new CD we reviewed here — has announced her summer tour in support of the album This Is What the Truth Feels Like. It kicks off in Massachusetts on July 12, and makes its way to Dallas Gexa Energy Pavilion on Saturday, Aug. 13. Eve will be the opening act.

Tickets officially go on sale at 10 a.m. on Friday here, but if you’re a CitiBank card member, you can get exclusive access to tickets today starting at 10 a.m. here.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Manilow rushed to hospital, forced to cancel 2 concerts, no word yet on Dallas show

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Following a performance in Memphis, Tenn., Barry Manilow was rushed to a Los Angeles-area hospital late Thursday night, Feb. 11, “due to complications from emergency oral surgery” he had on Monday, according to a post on the singer/songwriter’s Facebook page. Apparently, based on an update on Entertainment Tonight’s website, Manilow, 72, underwent a second surgery since returning to the hospital, and as of 9:43 a.m. PST, was out of surgery and doing well.

Quoting Manilow’s representative, ET reports that doctors don’t expect any further complications, but that Manilow “has been instructed not to talk, sing, or rap” for the next 48 hours.

Because of the medical emergency, Manilow was forced to postpone two other concerts in Tennessee, and may not be able to attend the Grammy Awards on Monday, Feb. 15. He is nominated for his 15th Grammy for his album, My Dream Duets, released in October 2014.

There’s been no word yet on whether the singer will have to cancel or postpone his Dallas concert, set for Tuesday night, Feb. 18, at the AAC.

Published reports have not indicated what caused Manilow to have to undergo the initial surgery.

—  Tammye Nash

CONCERT REVIEW: NKOTB

image3Is it fair to continue calling pop group New Kids on the Block a boy band? At an average age of 44, the guys are actually closer to AARP eligibility than boyhood. Yet, judging by the crowd’s high-pitched squeals and thunderous applause at American Airlines Center Thursday night — a concert broadcast live on Yahoo! Screen — NKOTB may remain forever young.

The group’s current tour, with supporting acts Nelly and TLC, was presented as a boxing match of sorts, complete with a sign-carrying ring girl and a rectangular open “ring” in the center of the arena’s floor. While the stage’s upfront placement brought artists and audience closer, it also meant that, as often as not, the audience was viewing performers’ backsides.

Round One. Rapper Nelly — a man whose Hulk-like arms defy images that his stage name might evoke in gay circles — opened the show. He was joined by a two-man crew and a bevy of bootylicious dancers as he performed biggest his including “Ride Wit Me” and “Hot in Herre.”

image4Round Two. Dressed in iridescent overalls, TLC (Tionne “T-Boz” Watkins and Rozonda “Chilli” Thomas) provided an R&B counterpoint to Nelly’s rap-heavy set. Highlights included a performance “Red Light Special” during which a lucky audience member (or, more likely, an audience plant) was escorted on stage for a sultry lap dance. The duo remembered late band mate Lisa “Left Eye” Lopes during a performance of “Waterfalls,” asking the audience to raise their phone lights in the air. And a performance of their timeless man-shaming classic “No Scrubs” brought the crowd to its feet.

Round Three. Collectively known as NKOTB, headliners Jordan Knight, Joey McIntyre, Donnie Wahlberg, Danny Wood and openly gay member Jonathan Knight took center stage in hooded boxing robes as a recorded ring announcer introduced them one-by-one. The group gave a visually stunning performance that included hydraulic stage stunts, pyrotechnics and an abundance of colorful confetti. The quintet performed a mix of pop songs and ballads from their repertoire including crowd-pleasers “Step By Step” and “Hanging Tough.” They also asked the audience to join them in singing “Happy Birthday” to Wood who celebrated his 46th birthday.

The concert was not short on eye candy, either. Quick-change cameras in the dressing rooms caught the boys in their underwear during a costume change, and McIntyre, the group’s youngest member, showed of his abs during a chest-baring solo.

Overall, the feel-good evening felt much like a college homecoming or a high school class reunion. And, even though the New Kids on the Block may no longer grace the pages of teen magazines, they proved that they still have the right stuff to draw a crowd.

Watch Yahoo!’s 24-hour rebroadcast of the May 14 event here.

— Scott Huffman

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Erasure rocks the House of Blues

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Erasure at House of Blues in Dallas

Dallas Voice’s associate advertising director, Chad Mantooth, was at the Erasure concert Tuesday night, Oct. 14, at House of Blues in Dallas, and he got these amazing photos to share.

Check out the schedule of upcoming concerts at House of Blues so that you won’t miss events like The Nick & Knight Tour on Nov. 5, featuring former boy band stars Nick Carter and Jordan Knight, or Neon Hitch’s Yard Sale Tour on Nov. 7.

—  Tammye Nash

Sam Smith performs at House of Blues (Get ready for Erasure)

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Openly gay performer Sam Smith packed the house at House of Blues in Dallas on Thursday night, and Dallas Voice ad rep/photographer to the stars Chad Mantooth was on hand to get these fabulous shots.

Erasure brings their Violet Flame Tour to House of Blues, 2200 N. Lamar St., in Dallas next Tuesday and Wednesday, Oct. 14-15. Tickets range from $39.50-$85.

 

 

—  Tammye Nash

No Tie giving away Cher concert tickets

CherDo you believe in life after an Oscar, a variety show, an ex-husband dying on a ski slope, a transgender child and gazillions of gay fanboys? Then you believe in Cher, who’ll be playing in Dallas on March 26, the third stop on her Dressed to Kill Tour. The gays love their uber-diva more than Judy herself, and the No Tie Dinner and Dessert party knows its audience. So, before the big fundraiser for AIDS Services of Dallas on April 12, the group is giving away tickets so any gypsies, tramps and thieves can see Cher in concert. Just pre-register for the No Tie Dinner now through March 19 at NoTieDinner.org, and you’ll be entered in the drawing. Don’t be late, though, because you can’t turn back time.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

REVIEW: Rihanna (finally) at AAC

IMG_7809Dallas and Rihanna have had a contentious relationship in the past — a point she brought up last night when recalling (1) in the 2011 show, where a fire onstage cut her gig short and of course, (2) this year’s cancellation, which led to Monday’s make-up concert at American Airlines Center. But she worked to make sure Dallas fans got the show she intended them to have. With a solid set of hits, RiRi delivered an expectedly big concert that straddled both old school performances and a karaoke night.

After her prologue of “Mother Mary,” the show exploded big with “Phresh Off The Runway,” setting a fast and furious tone for the rest of the night. Her cadre of dancers and her band surrounded the singer in a fairly minimal, but nonetheless, creative set of architectural columns and obligatory pop-star-concert display screens. But they never allowed eyes to be taken off the star. Or she wouldn’t. And couldn’t. Rihanna seemed to strive hard to win Dallas over and the screams were likely proof she did. The energy from the opening track to “Cockiness” was a nonstop flurry of clipped hits that was both thrilling and disappointing.

Often, she would edit her songs down to (perhaps) manage a quicker flow of her 23-song pre-encore set list, but nonetheless, it felt at times like a convenient medley. This reflects Rihanna’s pop expertise. She’s become a megastar through some respectable talent but more so through a blatant use of force. Seven albums in seven years, constant tours, her new Styled to Rock show on Bravo and that relentless media display of her 777 Tour last year, Rihanna knows that she needs to punch hard to be big and that first act of last night’s show was that on huge display.

But when she stepped away from being Rihanna The Product, she had genuine, even surprising moments that revealed the star she could truly be. Although merely a set-up, her opener “Mother Mary,” with just her on the stage is her frankness about fame. A haunting track where she admitted never thought this many people / would even know my name is one of the most confessional lines in pop and her voice extended that notion through the almost-capacity crowd.

She took the crowd to church as she winded the set down with her dance hits and again, she broke from both her brand and her fuck-it-all attitude. As the first notes of “We Found Love” chimed in, the grooves burst into jams and she enveloped herself in the blasting vibes of the track followed by “S&M,” “Only Girl (In the World)” and “Where Have You Been.” If even an expected move, the suite of songs were akin to a gay dance floor times infinity.

Unfortunately, she’s a fan of the backing track and didn’t shy away from not singing — while still “singing.” As she had even on her small and mid-size venue 777 tour, she would often let the mike drop to either pose or dance in hits like “Umbrella” and “You Da One.” That disregard though was so painfully obvious in her ballads where she practically refused to belt out the majorly dramatic chorus of “What Now,” her upcoming single of Unapologetic. If last night was Rihanna-karaoke, then the entire night would have been stellar.

At 25, Rihanna controlled the stage with rebellious poise. With cameras on her at all times, she almost doesn’t have a bad angle. She’s a stunning woman and can seduce both the stage audience and the camera at the same time. Rihanna then turned that into the party girl she needed to be to wrap the audience up into the show. Although a somewhat pseudo-show at times, she won her way back into Dallas’ graces without being unapologetic (see what I did there) for previous snafus. But when she returned for her one-two punch encore of “Stay” and “Diamonds,” all was forgiven and the crowd chorus wasn’t just a sing along, it was an embrace.

2 Chainz kept the fanfare on low but was nonetheless a monster onstage. Relying on the power of tracks like “Riot” and “I’m Different,” and rousing the crowd even more with “Beez in the Trap,” Chainz’s set had the polish of a pro with the spirit of a rebel.

—  Rich Lopez

Pink Martini’s gay bandleader Thomas Lauderdale commits to Sunday’s outdoor show rain or shine

Before Sunday’s concert at Annette Strauss Park, Pink Martini’s gay bandleader Thomas Lauderdale discussed just why the eclectic jazz outfit as been so productive lately. With four releases in the last three years, the band has churned out material faster than in their early days.

Lauderdale also says that with Dallas’ random weather lately, Pink Martini is set to deliver on Sunday whether there’s a crowd or not proving the band’s commitment to spread its distinct sound that delves into foreign lands and classic movies.

Read my conversation with Lauderdale after the jump. Pink Martini performs at Annette Strauss Square at the Winspear Opera House, 2403 Flora St. 8 p.m. $45–$65. ATTPAC.org.

—  Rich Lopez