Courage Campaign video deadline Wednesday

Just a reminder about last week’s post regarding Dustin Lance Black’s video challenge for the Courage Campaign. The deadline is Wednesday, although they did mention the possibility of extending. But why take that chance? Joshua Loker didn’t.

Loker, from Austin but with Dallas ties, has submitted his testimony. He talks about going from a cushy office job to the streets in his edited down version, but you can see the longer video here.

—  Rich Lopez

‘Milk’ screenwriter Dustin Lance Black hopes LGBT Texans respond to video challenge

Oscar winner Dustin Lance Black is trying to get the word out all over about his latest endeavor — especially to his one-time home state of Texas.

“I think this project is so important,” the Milk screenwriter told Dallas Voice this week. “People need to hear the stories of our LGBT brethren and straight allies from all areas. If you wanna change minds, you have to intro yourself and tell your story.”

Which is what he’s calling for people across America to do for the Courage Campaign’s Testimony initiative. And the former San Antonian hopes some Lone Star State peeps will get on board.

—  Rich Lopez

GetEqual Now joins protest in Orlando

C.d. Kirven

Dallas activist C.d. Kirven and Get Equal Now joined Stand Up Florida to protest an appearance by National Organization for Marriage in Orlando, Florida.

In the picture, Kirven was leading a prayer and asked “Who would Jesus hate?”

NOM’s recent protests have attracted few people so instead of outdoor demonstrations, they have moved their anti-gay rhetoric indoors, speaking in churches.

The counterprotest outside the church also included Courage Campaign, Come Out Orlando, Florida Together, Human Rights Campaign, Queer Activist Coalition, ISO, Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence and Metropolitan Community Church, among others.

Members of Get Equal Now and Stand Up Florida first met in Dallas in June when the group from the Sunshine State traveled to Dallas for the ExxonMobil protest.

Kirven said two NOM supporters were outside the church and about 10 were inside. Courage Campaign counted 150 NOM protesters.

One sign that read “Tradition is a Choice” referred to the accusation by conservative religious groups that homosexuality is a choice. Religion is a choice that is constitutionally protected.

“We had a victory in California and we are standing together for marriage equality today,” Kirven said at the rally. “This is not a battle between homosexual against heterosexual. This is a battle of justice against injustice. I would love to sit down with Dr. King who attended NOM’s Atlanta protest to begin a sisterhood between our communities. We must and will be free. Get Equal Now!”

—  David Taffet

How do you ‘cure’ gay marriage? One NOM supporter suggests by executing gays

Maggie Gallagher has taken her hate on the road with the National Organization for Marriage’s “One Man, One Woman” bus tour this summer. But so far, it doesn’t seem to be generating much interest — at least not from the anti-gay-marriage movement. LGBT rights advocates do seem to be turning out in force to protest the tour most everywhere it stops.

For example, Bil Browning over at The Bilerico Project reports that when NOM stopped in Indianapolis for a rally on Monday, July 26, there were only about 40 anti-gay-marriage folks there. And at least a quarter of those were tour staff members.

Those who showed up to protest the NOM’ers, on the other hand, numbered about 250, Browning said.

But here is the guy at the Indianapolis rally who’s getting the most attention: Larry Adams, who was holding a sign quoting verses in Leviticus saying that any man who has sex with another man should be put to death, and including a drawing of two nooses.

A young woman with the Courage Campaign interviews Adams on camera, posted below, and you can watch the video and see for yourself what he has to say. You’ll also notice that even though Adams is there in support of NOM, NOM really isn’t interested in having his support. At least not publicly.

At least three people interrupt the interview to try and either stop it altogether or to at least distance NOM from Adams and his message. One of the NOM guys tells Adams “we don’t want anything inflammatory” and “we’re here in love.” Adams assures him that he is on NOM’s side.

But at the same time, NOM is careful not to try and run off the Courage Campaign tour trackers. They obviously don’t want a repeat of what happened at the NOM tour stop in Maryland, where NOM official Brian Brown got police to remove a videographer from the Courage Campaign, threatening to have the cameraman arrested if he didn’t leave.

Of course, instead of Larry Adams and his signs advocating murder, the problem at the Maryland rally was the REALLY small crowd. Guess Brown didn’t want anybody documenting just how small the crowd was.

You can read about that incident and see video footage and photos here.

OK, now watch this video from NOM’s site, with what they call “truly shocking” footage of aggressive LGBT protestors “storming” their podium and bullying and intimidating a woman nursing her baby.

OK, I did see the one guy “storming” the podium. One guy. And I did see the nursing mother surrounded by her other children sitting at the back of the rally. But I never saw anybody messing with her. What was VERY obvious was the fact that the LGBT civil rights supporters FAR outweighed the NOM ralliers. Even in NOM’s own video.

—  admin

Could Prop 8 make good Court TV?

Tell Judge Walker you want your Prop 8 TV.
Tell Judge Walker you want your Prop 8 TV.

This is already abuzz over the Interweb. It looks like U.S. District Court Judge Vaughn Walker wants to open his courtroom to the television cameras as he oversees the federal court challenge to Prop 8 Monday. However, instead of just making that decision, Walker wants to open up the idea to the public to televise the proceedings. But he needs to hear from you by Friday.

The California-based Courage Campaign has sent out an email collecting signatures encouraging Judge Walker to go ahead with the cameras. Their e-mail message comes after the jump.

—  Rich Lopez