RCD opens new dental suite

United Way provided funding for construction, staffing of new suite being named in honor of Bret Camp

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Bret Camp

Tammye Nash  |  Senior Editor
nash@dallasvoice.com

Resource Center Dallas was set to dedicate a complete new suite in its dental clinic on Friday, Dec. 16, and RCD Executive Director and CEO Cece Cox said the new suite is being named in honor of Bret Camp, former RCD associate director in charge of the agency’s health services.

“We wanted to honor Bret’s 16 years with this agency, and his knowledge and service to our community,” Cox said. “We felt naming this dental suite after him was an appropriate way to do that.”

Camp left Resource Center Dallas last summer due to health issues.
The dental clinic is housed within the Nelson-Tebedo Clinic, located on Cedar Springs Road near the intersection with Throckmorton Street.

Cox also noted that the costs of construction for the new dental suite and the cost of staffing it for one year came to $125,000, and was fully funded by United Way of Dallas. Those funds were part of the $225,000 total RCD received from United Way.

“Dental care is one of the highest priority needs” for people with HIV/AIDS who access health care assistance in Dallas County, Cox said, adding that facilities to meet the growing need were lacking.

“With this new dental suite, we can serve more clients and we can get them in for care faster,” Cox said. With the new suite in place, she said, RCD’s dental clinic will be serving about 1,000 clients a year.

As federal funding priorities shift and funding for HIV/AIDS-related services decline, Cox said last month that RCD is among those agencies looking for ways to expand its clinical services beyond just the HIV/AIDS community. But, she added this week, doing so will be a long and complex process.

“When you have a program funded with federal money, you have to keep that segregated, completely separate from your other services,” Cox said. “You can just lump it all together.”

Cox also said that RCD officials are considering whether some services now housed at the Nelson-Tebedo Clinic on Cedar Springs Road will remain at that location after the center moves into planned new facilities at Cedar Springs and Inwood Road. Construction on the new facility, designed by architect James Langford who was trained by I.M. Pei, is set to begin in 2014.

Cox said that a lot of the work of the Nelson-Tebedo Clinic revolves around HIV/AIDS testing and prevention efforts, and that the clinic’s current location in the center of the area traditionally considered Dallas’ LGBT neighborhood is most advantageous to that work.

“Right now, the clinic is located right in the heart of the neighborhood. It is a good location for those services, and that is a historically important site,” Cox said. “We do see some big advantages to continuing to maintain a presence there even after our new facilities are built.”

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition December 16, 2011.

—  Kevin Thomas

LGBT advocates give DISD an ‘F’ on implementing anti-bullying policy

Cox, Narvaez say some administrators are telling employees not to use online reporting system

DISD

CALLING OUT DISD | Cece Cox with Resource Center Dallas and Omar Narvaez with Lambda Legal this week urged DISD board members to force employees to step up implementation of the district’s anti-bullying policy. (David Taffet/Dallas Voice)

DAVID TAFFET  |  Staff Writer
taffet@dallasvoice.com

Resource Center Dallas Executive Director and CEO Cece Cox this week accused Dallas Independent School District officials of instructing principals to ignore the reporting requirement in the school district’s anti-bullying policy.

Speaking at a DISD board meeting Thursday morning, Dec. 1, Cox called board members that adopted the policy visionary, but gave the district a grade of “F” in implementing the policy.

Lambda Legal Community Educator Omar Narvaez also spoke at the Dec. 1 board meeting.
DISD passed the anti-bullying policy in November 2010, soon after a string of teens across the country committed suicide after having been repeatedly bullied at school. The Dallas policy was implemented more than six months before the Texas Legislature passed and Gov. Rick Perry signed a new statewide anti-bullying law.

Narvaez said that the Dallas policy was cited repeatedly in Austin as the anti-bullying bill made its way through the Legislature.

But he said that a year after the Dallas policy was adopted, only about a third of principals have been trained on the computer-based reporting system, that most schools do not have the system in place and even more do not know how to use it.

Narvaez urged DISD to step up its implementation.

Cox said that many schools only sporadically adhere to key provisions of the policy —  enforcement and reporting.

A year after adopting the policy, Cox said, “I’m sorry to report the wheels have fallen off. Your grade is ‘F.’”

She said that there was a deliberate attempt by some DISD administrators to stop the implementation of the anti-bullying policy. “My agency has received reports from [DISD] employees,” Cox said.

“They have been told not to use the online reporting system.”

She warned the board of the serious consequences of ignoring bullying in schools: “You will have blood on your hands.”

Narvaez also praised the policy that passed unanimously a year ago, noting that it is being used as “a blueprint across the state.”

But, he added, two-thirds of DISD principals still need to be trained on the reporting system.

“It’s time we forget about politics,” he said.

Narvaez told the board several stories of DISD students having been bullied for a variety of reasons beyond sexual orientation and reminded them that the policy would keep all students safer.

Narvaez said that while some administrators fear that repeated reports of bullying would be counted against a school, instead, schools with the highest rates of reporting should be seen as having principals doing their jobs diligently and that schools that don’t report incidents of bullying should be seen as having principals ignoring the problem.

After the two spoke during the brief public comments section of the board meeting, DISD trustee Nancy Bingham spoke privately with Cox. Bingham, an early supporter of the anti-bullying policy, said the board would be getting a briefing.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition December 2, 2011.

—  Kevin Thomas

Troy Sands Remembrance Party at Dallas Eagle with Tony Moran

And the beat goes on

Earlier this year, DJ Troy Sands passed away due to cancer. Through the years, he made both an impact and an impression with his music and DJ skills at The Brick in its former location on Maple. He grew his name by being one of the first DJs to headline parties and events outside of Dallas. DJs such as Blaine Soileau and Chris Cox have seen him as their inspiration for their musical perspectives. Before passing on, Sands deejay-ed at the Dallas Eagle. In honor of his life and his musical gifts to the club scene, the Eagle  hosts the DJ Troy Sands Remembrance Party which also benefits some of his favorite organizations. DJ Tony Moran steps in to headline the night, but this is truly Sands’ night.

DEETS: Dallas Eagle, 5740 Maple Ave. 10 p.m. $10. DallasEagle.com.

—  Rich Lopez

An Horse, of course

 

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SADDLE UP | Kate Cooper, foreground, says this time in Dallas will be a proper showing for An Horse.

Don’t argue grammar with Kate Cooper, the lesbian half of the Down Under duo An Horse

RICH LOPEZ  | Staff Writer
lopez@dallasvoice.com

First things first: Grammarians and language mavens might have trouble with the band An Horse. Not that there is anything wrong with the music, but that two-letter article strikes some nerves — including with this writer.

But Kate Cooper is fine with any way people talk about it.

“Oh, people get so worked up about it, but it is arguably correct,” she says.

Cooper, who is touring with bandmate Damon Cox, brings the international pop stylings of An Horse to Dallas Monday. With their second album, Walls, An Horse seems to have found their sound, a polished collection of a dozen tunes that play as if a sprawling backing band helped out.

A job well done … but that name.

An Horse. Yeah, it’s tough to work with.

“I’m happy that it gets people talking about grammar,” she chuckles.

The story about the name related to an argument Cooper had with her sister over the use of the article a in front of words beginning in h. That resulted in her sister making a sweater for Cooper with the words on it and subsequently being asked if that was a band … and thus band history was created.

Cooper and Cox are on a high from supporting Walls. Even though the band has played Dallas before, she disputes it was a proper showing (a last minute venue cancellation and other problems marred it), so Cooper figures this time will be better.

“Yeah, we’re looking forward to it and we’ve stayed in Dallas before so we kind of know the city,” she says. “We’ve stayed there while making our way to Austin and every time we drove through, we’d play the Dallas theme song. That’s always my impression of the city.“

An Horse’s debut, 2009’s Rearrange Beds, was really a collection of demos cobbled together. With a label behind them this time around and an actual production team in place, this might be An Horse’s winning run.

“It just feels like a proper record from a proper band,” she says. “The first time, we weren’t really a band so much as just friends wanting to make music. Next thing we knew we had an album and were on tour and it was all kind of an accident.”

Cox and Cooper worked in a record store together and became BFF’s before becoming a band. Little did they know they’d catch the eyes and ears of some big names. Garnering attention from major music pubs like Rolling Stone and Pitchfork put An Horse on the map. Cooper knows they are still young and green, but such accolades comfort and encourage her.

“It’s all great even though I don’t read them,” she says. “It’s good to get the attention and for a band from Australia, that’s impossible. But we’re still both learning and taking more things in. We’re just better equipped this time around.”

Even if they weren’t receiving the high praise, it doesn’t matter to Cooper. She would still make music.

“Yeah, but I’d be doing it just in my bedroom,” she says.

Although from Australia and now based in Canada, Cooper hasn’t found any difference in attitudes among countries when it comes to her being an out lesbian musician.

“I’m lucky I’m surrounded by people and fans that it’s not a thing to them,” she says. “Everywhere we go it’s just me being me. Occasionally I’ll hear a comment but they are usually a lazy reference point. I just say more power to them and their small minds.”

And they’re not so indie that they’d skip out on playing specifically LGBT events. It’s just a matter of timing and, well, requests.

“I know it’s come up once or twice, but the scheduling didn’t work,” she says. “But we haven’t been really been asked to play any Pride events. I’m very proud of being a gay person and I’d be stoked to do that.”

Are you listening, Dallas Tavern Guild?

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition May 20, 2011.

—  Kevin Thomas

Bradford Cox aka Atlas Sound aka Deerhunter frontman releases free music download

Yesterday, Bradford Cox posted practically a whole album on his website available for free download. Under his moniker Atlas Sound, he offers Bedroom Databank Vol. 1, 11 tracks of work recorded at home and on his computer. Of the 11, there are two covers: Dylan and the Band’s “This Wheel’s on Fire,” which you might know as the theme from Absolutely Fabulous recorded by Julie Driscoll and Adrian Edmondson, and Kurt Vile’s “Freak Train.”

Sure he didn’t do an interview with us when he was last in town, but all is forgiven since we’re getting all this free music now. Funny how that works.

—  Rich Lopez

‘Come see history being made’

LGBT advocates are encouraging people to attend this Thursday’s DISD board of trustees meeting, where a final vote is expected on an LGBT-inclusive bullying policy.

“Come see history being made,” said Rafael McDonnell, a spokesman for Resource Center Dallas. “We would certainly like to see a packed crowd of people supporting the policy. You can stop by on your way home.”

The meeting is at 5:30 p.m. in the Ada L. Williams Auditorium at 3700 Ross Ave. in Dallas.

If the measure is approved, the district will become the first in the state to adopt an LGBT-inclusive bullying policy.

McDonnell said RCD Executive Director Cece Cox is slated to address the board of trustees prior to the vote. The center was also working to line up DISD students to speak.

None of the school district’s nine trustees objected to the proposed policy when it was first discussed in a work session two weeks ago, but McDonnell said he’s not taking anything for granted.

To read the policy, go here.

—  John Wright

WATCH: Deerhunter at Granada Theater last night

The indie band Deerhunter sounded in fine form as they performed “Revival” in this video. Bradford Cox’s vocals held up nicely in all kinds of registers. They headlined a late set with three openers last night at the Granada.

—  Rich Lopez

Out musician Bradford Cox leads Deerhunter to the Granada tonight

Bradford Cox in a dress is always a possibility

Last November, Atlas Sound was scheduled for a show at Hailey’s and then canceled. Hopefully, this won’t happen twice. Atlas Sound, aka Bradford Cox, is the gay frontman for the psychedelia-gazing punk band Deerhunter. They’ve come off their self-imposed hiatus that began in 2008 to record their fourth album, Halcyon Digest, which dropped in September. OK, that’s more a break than hiatus.

They made a splash out of Atlanta with their 2005 debut album Turn It Up Faggot — which was “an insult that Cox claimed was often thrown at the band during their gigs,” according to AllMusic — and then released the brilliant Microcastle/Weird Era Continued album two years ago.

Cox has Marfan Syndrome, which elongates his limbs making for quite an impression. At 6 feet, 4 inches, his skinny arms and legs make him look larger than life in an awkward way (and in the occasional onstage frock or dress), but that’s far from the point of Cox or Deerhunter even. As musicians, they have created some challenging and trippy music and their live show reputation borders on amazing.

Check them out at their Loft concert a year ago in the video below.

DEETS: With Best Coast (yes!), Sonny and the Sunsets and Casino Vs. Japan at the Granada Theater, 3524 Greenville Ave . 8 p.m. $18. GranadaTheater.com.

—  Rich Lopez

This Deerhunter remix video for ‘Helicopter’ should get you in the mood for their Nov. show.

Perhaps this will get you revved for Deerhunter’s upcoming show in November. The band, fronted by the out Bradford Cox (AKA Atlas Sound), brings their tour to the Granada Theater in exactly two weeks.

Remixed by Diplo and Lunice, this “Helicopter” video is a lot of back and forth imagery, but somehow it fits right into Deerhunter’s m.o. of dreamy indie rock. Just because it’s a remix, don’t expect a dance party. Diplo and Lunice keep it chill and relaxed. I’d have posted here but Vimeo is busting my balls about embedding for whatever reason. So check it here.

—  Rich Lopez