Best Bets • 05.06.16

Friday 05.06 — Saturday 05.14


DTC, Cara Mia cross the border with ‘Deferred Action’

What happens to a DREAM Act deferred? Does it dry up like a raisin in the sun? That’s the question posed by the world premiere play Deferred Action, a co-venture of the Dallas Theater Center and Cara Mia Theatre Co. Locally developed by authors David Lozano and Lee Trull, the play explores the effect of the federal immigration DREAM Act and how its enforcement affects undocumented aliens and their families.

Wyly Theatre
2400 Flora St.
Through May 14.

Saturday 05.07


TITAS celebrates dance with annual Command Performance Gala and dinner

Every season, TITAS imports some of the most innovative, new and storied dance companies in the world for months-worth of magic. But every spring, you get a sort of chef’s selection of the cream of the crop at the Command Performance Gala, which invites artists back to deliver a slate of amazing performance. This year’s line-up includes performers from MOMIX, Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, the Joffrey Ballet and more. It’s a once-a-year extravaganza.

Winspear Opera House
2403 Flora St.
7 p.m.

Sunday 05.08


Celebrate Mother’s Day with Women’s Chorus of Dallas

Mother’s Day is almost upon us, and so is the Women’s Chorus of Dallas’ annual spring concert, this year entitled Voices of Wonder. The outdoor concert at Fair Park’s Texas Discovery Gardens combines nature and formal music performances as well as a butterfly release. In addition, this year marks the inauguration of a shorter matinee concert, starting at noon.

Texas Discovery Gardens
3601 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.
Noon and 2 p.m.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition May 6, 2016.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Magic Johnson?

LBJ goes ‘All the Way,’ but DTC’s staging is a disappointing tragedy of errors

Brandon-PotterIt’s a tenet of criticism that you can only review the thing in front of you. The cake is stale, the piano is out of tune, the soprano has laryngitis? It doesn’t make any difference how well-intentioned the artists involved are — if they give you lemons, you don’t get to make lemonade.

It’s with that in mind that Dallas Theater Center’s production of All the Way stands as one of the most frustrating shows of the current season: A play that, as written, is full of good, relevant ideas — it’s about the first year of LBJ’s presidency, when he was running for his party’s nomination while trying to force the 1964 Civil Right Act through a hostile Congress — but this production is a complete mess, staged with such disregard for its audience’s attention span as to almost feel insulting.

Directed by Kevin Moriarty, the artistic director of the Dallas Theater Center, it opened last month at Houston’s Alley Theatre (the first such co-production between the two Texas regional powerhouses). Perhaps that space was more conducive to Moriarty’s blocking decisions, but in the thrust configuration of the Wyly Theatre’s Potter Rose Hall, it feels almost like he’s thumbed his nose intentionally at season ticket-holders. Seated in the third row of the orchestra, I watched the entire production behind a phalanx of bulky, unnecessary wicker chairs. It might as well have been a radio play for great swaths of dialogue (and there is lots of dialogue) as Moriarty peculiarly sets two-thirds of the action at or near the proscenium line of the stage. I’m not sure what compulsion forces theater directors to place the action as far from the seats as humanly possibly; you’d think they would take full advantage of the benefits of flexible configurations to bring the actor close to those paying their salaries.

Then again, the choice in this case could be justified for one good reason: to hide from sharp-eyed patrons the appalling amateurish makeup (lace-front toupees to beat the band! Get a drag queen in the dressing rooms to show them how to do this right) and ill-fitting, frumpy costumes, riddled with bad hems and ratty fabrics. (I hope the real president of the U.S. doesn’t give stump speeches with moth-eaten holes in his trousers.) And for this privilege you get to sit in the notorious Wyly chairs, which, if I’m not mistaken, are what Donald Trump had in mind when he said he’d bring back water-boarding “and worse” to torture Gitmo inmates. (“I confess! I kidnapped the Lindbergh baby and conspired to shoot JFK! Just please give me a shorter first act!!!”)

Screen shot 2016-03-10 at 11.58.35 AMIn order to squeeze all these missteps into a lean three hours, Moriarty also employs the most overused tropes of modern theatrical staging: Deafening and sudden music cues to separate scenes (it’s meant to seem cinematic — the live-action equivalent of film editing — but after a decade of this gimmick, it feels more like auditory manhandling), and on-set projections to spell out the times and dates of key events. Look, no one appreciates being well-oriented in a story’s timeline better than I do, but when we’re forced to read “eleven months … until election….” “ten months…,” “seven” every three minutes, you’re not adding anything that focuses our attention or adds real value. The entire play takes place over a mere 50 weeks; I think I got this time thing covered.

So, those are all the ways that All the Way goes wrong with staging; then we have the casting conundrums. I’m all in favor of local casting — most of the 17 actors here are culled from the resident acting companies of the DTC and the Alley — but this one feels cobbled together. Martin Luther King Jr. was 35 years old during all the events portrayed, but actor Shawn Hamilton looks at least a decade older, and despite a pencil moustache, totally ignores King’s vocal richness: The honeyed baritone, the preacher’s pacing. There’s very little in terms of attempted impersonation. Compare that with Michael Brusasco as George Wallace, who seems like a MadTV version of the racist cracker — a performance that’s all bad wig and cornpone clichés without any subtlety. (Quite a few of the over-the-top accents, gimmicky tics and exaggerated reactions elicited titters from the audience opening night.)

In some ways, it’s hard to fault the actors, almost all of whom play two and three characters apiece. They have scant seconds to sputter and blink their eyes after having been berated by the volatile, paranoid bully who was Lyndon Baines Johnson. As played by Brandon Potter, he’s part sociopath, part master politician. (Is there a difference?) He treats everyone from Lady Bird to J. Edgar Hoover with a rollercoaster of sweet cajoling and spewed invectives. I can’t tell if it’s a complex portrait of a man in all his moods or a salad of random ideas tossed with a tangy vinaigrette.

I suspect that the author, Robert Schenkkan (who won a Tony Award for All the Way and is a native Texan), cobbled together the most complete portrait of that man he could, given limitations of a work of theater (he didn’t have Robert Caro’s gift of 3,000 pages of historical research to develop the character). He presents a warts-and-all portrait of the man as a craven manipulator but also a principled liberal, who would do whatever he could to achieve his goals. In that way, it plays like Richard III with an air of sympathy. And Schenkkan inserts plenty of references to the art of the possible that play out with shockingly timely echoes of the current election cycle. It’s too bad all these good things are tied up in a bloated, loud and hopelessly opaque version. It reminds me of Will Rogers’ backhanded dictum: “I’m not a member of an organized political party — I’m a Democrat.” So, sadly, is this production.

— Arnold Wayne Jones

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition March 11, 2016.

Editor’s note: The actor playing Martin Luther King was incorrectly identified in the print edition. The corrected credit has been made here.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Best Bets • 02.26.16

Friday 02.26—Saturday 02.27


Black Academy of Arts and Letters presents 12th annual Festival of Black Dance Weekend

Jamaica’s Stella Maris Dance Company returns to Dallas to share the spotlight with Atlanta Dance Connection, in it’s first Dallas appearance, at the Black Academy of Arts and Letters’ 12th annual Festival of Black Dance. The Stella Marris company will perform the specially commissioned spoken word piece, “My Language,” written by Curtis King.

Naomi Martin Main Stage
605 S. Griffin St. 8 p.m.
Tickets are $10

Saturday 02.27


‘Real Housewives’ star performing Saturday at The Brick

With six consecutive No. 1 dance hits under her belt and a new album due out this spring, Erika Jayne is sure to get you in the mood to move. Dannee Phann Productions presents the Real Housewives of Beverly Hills star at The Brick, 2525 Wycliff Road. Doors open at 9 p.m.; the show starts at midnight and will be followed by
a meet-and-greet with Jayne.

General admission tickets are $20 in advance.
VIP table for three packages are $150, and table seating only is $30 per person.

Thursday 03.03


Dallas Theater Center and Alley Theatre present All The Way

Dallas Theater Center presents, in a co-production with Alley Theatre, a “Texas-sized” production of All The Way, Robert Schenkkan’s fascinating portrait of Lyndon B. Johnson, from the moment of his accidental presidency in 1963 to his landslide election a year later. Directed by DTC’s Kevin Moriarity, the show features actors from both DTC and the Alley Theatre in Houston.

It opens Thursday in Dallas after a successful run in Houston, and continues through March 27.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition February 26, 2016.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

BREAKING: DTC announces 2016-17 season


Doug Beane

Kevin Moriarty, artistic director of the Dallas Theater Center, revealed a nine-show season (seven mainstage, two “extras”) this morning, including a remarkable two world premiere musicals.

The season kicks off with Nick Payne’s Constellations (Aug. 24–Oct. 9, at the Wyly), a romantic drama that plumbs issues of life, the universe and everything in 75 stark minutes. It will be directed by Wendy Dann.

Next up is the first premiere musical, written by an alumna of DTC: Bella: An American Tall Tale (Sept. 22–Oct. 23, at the Wyly) by Kirsten Childs (co-lyricist on DTC’s Peter Pan musical Fly). A co-production with Playwrights Horizons in New York, the musical comedy — set in the Old West, and featuring the adventures of a young black woman and the characters she meets — will be directed by the acclaimed gay playwright and director Robert O’Hara (Bootycandy).

That’l be followed by the annual bonus show A Christmas Carol (Nov. 23–Dec. 28, at the Wyly), this time directed by Dallas theater stallwart Steven Michael Walters.

The final show of 2016 — and the first of 2017 — is … well, a secret. Suffice it for now to say it’s an exciting and contemporary urban comedy, running Dec. 7–Jan. 22 in the Wyly’s Studio space. (We’ll announce the name some time next month.)

That mystery show is followed by The Christians (Jan. 26–Feb. 19, at the Kalita), Lucas Hnath’s volative, buzzed-about look at a megachurch and a rift occasioned, in part, by same-sex marriage. Joel Ferrell will direct.

Another bonus show will be something on the deeply experimental side. Moriarty is adapting Eruipides’ lurid revenge play Electra … and it will be very outre. First, it will be performed at AT&T’s outdoor Annette Strauss Square adjacent to the Winspear. Second, Moriarty is still toying with how he will stage it — moving the audience around the grounds to follow the action and using earbuds to “whisper” a Greek chorus into the audience members’ ears are just some of the possible outcomes. “You can see how this could be a disaster,” Moriarty said. It will run Aug. 4–May 28, 2017, with a late start time (8:30 p.m.) so that it will be performed in the dark.

Next is the classic play Inherit the Wind (May 16–June 18, at the Kalita), about the 1924 Scopes Monkey Trial … only it won’t be set in the past, apparently. Moriarty, who is also directing this one, promises edgy casting decisions and innovating concepts like nothing you’ve seen at the Kalita.

The season will conclude with the second world premiere musical, a comic riff on the Robin Hood myth called Hood (June 29–Aug. 6, in the Wyly). It’s being written by the husband-and-husband team Douglas Carter Beane (pictured) and Lewis Flinn, who last teamed up for DTC’d Give It Up (which moved to Broadway renamed Lysistrata Jones). Beane will direct.

The current season isn’t over, though. All the Way, DTC’s co-production will Houston’s Alley Theatre about LBJ, will move up to the Wyly next month (March 3–27), followed by the world premiere of Deferred Action (April 20–May 14) and finally Dreamgirls (June 10–July 24).

Season subscriptions start at $140 for the seven-show mainstage season, and design-your-own subscriptions start at $60 for three shows. Visit

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Best Bets • 02.05.16

Friday 02.05


Texas Theatre, Cine Wilde team for screening and party of ‘The Hunger,’ honoring David Bowie

The death of the pioneering artist David Bowie continues to resonate, and Cine Wilde — the monthly gay film fest — has paired up again with Texas Theatre to screen one of his most outrageous and stylish films, Tony Scott’s 1983 film The Hunger. Bowie and Catherine Deneuve play modern-day vampires in a cat-and-mouse pursuit of Susan Sarandon. The screening with be followed by a after-party featuring punkish DJ music. Come ready to dance.

The Texas Theatre
231 W. Jefferson Blvd.
9:20 p.m. screening;
11 p.m. after-party

Friday 02.05 — Sunday 02.28


Dallas Theater Center revisits the Bard with ‘Romeo & Juliet’

For the first four full seasons with Artistic Directed Kevin Moriarty, the Dallas Theater Center performed one of Shakespeare’s plays — a comedy, a history, a tragedy and a so-called romance — each season. The tradition dropped off, though, after King Lear. Well, it’s back, with another of the major tragedies, Romeo & Juliet. Unlike the last four, Moriarty isn’t directing this one (that role falls to the talented Joel Ferrell) and it moves from Downtown’s Wyly Theatre back to the DTC’s Uptown haunts at the Kalita Humphreys.

Kalita Humphreys Theater
3636 Turtle Creek Blvd.

Saturday 02.13


BalletBoyz dance troupe makes its Dallas debut with graceful muscularity

With its innovative combination of weightless elegance and brute muscularity, the U.K.’s BalletBoyz is one of the most intensely exciting dance troupes in the world today. The company makes its Dallas debut on Feb. 13 with a sensual performance at the Winspear. This may be the most anticipated local premiere of TITAS’ all-dance season.

Winspear Opera House
2403 Flora St.
8 p.m.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition February 5, 2016.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

DTC collects more than $138K for NTFB

NTFB Check Presentation - Photo by Dana Driensky (2)

DTC staff presenting check to the NTFB, where many staffers volunteered

For the eighth year, the Dallas Theater Center has taken up donations for the North Texas Food Bank during every performance of his annual holiday show A Christmas Carol. This year’s run of the show netted $138,020.69 for the food pantry, including a $57,000 block donation from an anonymous donor. That pays for nearly half a million meals for those with food insecurity across the Metroplex.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

STAGE REVIEW: ‘Clarkston’

Sam Lilja - Photo by Karen Almond

Sam Lilja as Chris in ‘Clarkston.’ (Photo courtesy Karen Almond)

It’s training day at the Clarkston Costco warehouse. Chris (Sam Lilja) is the veteran, instructing newcomer Jake (Taylor Trensch) on the procedures. They are not complicated: Move this inventory from this box to this shelf; repeat. Show up on time. And try not to break anything. It’s grunt work, but solid employment for the natives of this humble berg on the Idaho/Washington border.

Only Jake isn’t a native. He’s that rarest of birds — a newcomer who seems to want to slow down and take root in this town best known for being a stop on the trail of the Lewis and Clark expedition, a stopover on their route to the Pacific Ocean, and nobody has thought much about it since then. It’s like a lot of small-town life: The dull wallpaper of Americana. So what brings Jake here?

Clarkston, Samuel D. Hunter’s world premiere at the Wyly Theatre (a companion to his prior play Lewiston, also set in the creaky Upper Midwest), has a hint of mystery to it, not unlike most classic-structure character-driven plays, of which this falls firmly within the tradition: Three characters, minimal set, one act (though, at 105 minutes, not a short play). The drama derives from the interpersonal relationships, the reveal of information Jake and Chris secrete and only dole out occasionally. That’s not a lot of forward-thrust to sustain a play (unlike, say, All My Sons the reveals never rise to the level of “caused the deaths of soldiers”), though for the first two-thirds, you don’t really notice: You do get caught up in their lives.

The more interesting life, as it turns out, is Chris’. He’s a hotbed of hidden emotions. Gay but largely closeted, with a meth-head mom (Heidi Armbruster, all day-sweats and trembling lower lip) and absent dad, Chris aspires to be a novelist (he’s applied to the prestigious and exclusive Iowa Writers Workshop) and is saving up money to get out of Clarkston. Jake, though, is the emotional opposite. Out and proud, from a family of means, he over-shares like that person on Facebook we all want to unfriend. But his secrets are more dire: He’s suffering from a form of Huntingon’s disease that should kill him within the decade. He’s looking for real world experiences … which, apparently, include systematically destroying Chris’ life.

Oh, dear. We all have a Jake in our lives. Deeply insecure but defiantly unapologetic, he seeks to live others’ lives for them: Interceding in their affairs, betraying confidences, acting out of spite and malice without thought for consequences. For the first half of Clarkston, you think this will be his story, but it’s really Chris’ — a prosaic tragedy, as if Willy Loman got cut down before he even met Linda. The transition, though, feels abrupt, and when you realize the pain Jake has caused, it’s difficult to sympathize with him at all … which makes the ending (seemingly hopeful, despite everything that came before it) feel tacked-on and inauthentic.

Still, for most of the performance you do get caught up in the details of these lives, their sadness and their specificity. It’s a chamber piece with promise.

Through Jan. 31 at the Wyly Theatre Studio.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Holiday Gift Idea: The gift of theater

Networks--Elf-(Boise)-----107-copyThere really are gifts that keep on giving, and a season subscription to a theater company is a real way to have something new for your sweetheart all year long (and provides you both something to do together). North Texas is full of theaters to support, but we recommend Dallas Summer Musicals (you can still get tickets for the first show of the season, Elf, reviewed this week), or get someone in Cowtown a similar lineup from Performing Arts Fort Worth; Uptown Players (which next month kicks off with a bonus show with the Turtle Creek Chorale), WaterTower Theatre, the Dallas Theater Center (which has a gay-themed show running right now) and many more. Support the arts and those on your gift lift.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

BREAKING: DTC announces 2015-16 season lineup

rsDTC Artistic Director Kevin Moriarty_Photo by Tadd MyersThe Dallas Theater Center will offer up three world premieres, partner with Houston’s famed Alley Theatre and return to Shakespeare in their next season, Kevin Moriarty, the DTC’s artistic director, just announced.

The season will also take place almost entirely at the Wyly Theatre downtown; this season, every show has ping-ponged between the Wyly and Uptown’s Kalita Humphreys Theater. Only Romeo & Juliet, the company’s first stab at Shakespeare since King Lear several seasons ago, will be at the Kalita.

Also, for the first time since the Wyly opened, there will be no summer musical. After Sense & Sensibility closes in late May, the DTC will be dark until the Sept. 2 debut of Moonshine: That Hee Haw Musical, one of the world premieres announced by Moriarty. Based on the cornpone TV show, it will launch the 2015–16 season, running Sept. 2–Oct. 11 in the Potter Rose Hall at the Wyly.

Concurrently upstairs at the Wyly will be the area premiere of The Mountaintop, the Tony-nominated play about the last night of Martin Luther King Jr. It will run Sept. 11–Nov. 15 in the 99-seat Studio Theatre.

The season will then pick up with the traditional holiday show, A Christmas Carol. Brierley Resident Acting Company member Christina Vela will direct the adaptation by Moriarty, which the DTC has performed for the past two seasons. It will play Nov. 25–Dec. 26.

In a rare double bill during Dickens, the world premiere play Clarkston will run Dec. 3–Jan. 31 in the Studio Theatre. The play is about two men — a descendant of the explorer William Clark and a grad student in gender studies — who explore issues of faith and doubt in modern society. The author is MacArthur Foundation “Genius Grant” recipient Samuel Hunter.

In January 2016, the action moves to the Kalita for Romeo & Juliet, directed by Joel Ferrell. It runs Jan. 27–Feb. 28. Then it’s back to the Wyly for the area premiere of All the Way, the Tony Award winner from last Broadway season about LBJ. Moriarty will direct the show, which runs March 3–27.

Deferred Action, the final world premiere, will open from local playwrights David Lozano (Oedipus el Rey) and Lee Trull (A Christmas Carol). It deals with a Dreamer — a young immigrant taking advantage of the Dream Act (April 20–May 15). Finally, DTC returns to the summer musical format with a new presentation of Dreamgirls, the Tony-, Grammy- and Oscar-winning fictionalized telling of Motown and the rise of the Supremes (June 10–July 24).

Season subscriptions go on sale Feb. 9 and are available for as low as $126 (A Christmas Carol is a “bonus” show).

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

‘Rocky Horror’ review review: Mary L. Clark responds

Screen shot 2014-09-24 at 12.01.28 PM

Yesterday afternoon (Tuesday, Sept. 23), Dallas Voice’s executive editor of life+style, Arnold Wayne Jones, posted this blog criticizing this review, by Mary L. Clark, associate critic for John Garcia’s The Column, of Dallas Theater Center‘s current production of The Rocky Horror Picture Show.

Arnold’s blog obviously generated a lot of discussion. It has, as I write this, been “tweeted” nine times and “shared” or “liked” on Facebook 401 times. I was out of the office taking photos of Gay World Series opening day games, so I missed the uproar. But I heard about it this morning.

In my email was a response from Mary L. Clark. I read that, then I started reading Arnold’s review of the DTC production and then his post criticizing Mary Clark’s review. Then I got a call from John Garcia. I don’t think he was satisfied with my response because I didn’t agree to delete Arnold’s blog about Mary Clark’s review. What I am going to do, though, is post Mary Clark’s email here on our blog — find it below — and give folks the chance to see what she had to say. I think that’s fair.

And also in the interest of fairness, let me say these two things: I believe that some of the language to which Arnold objected has been changed in Mary Clark’s review posted online at The Column. And John Garcia stressed that some of the language to which Arnold objected — including the word “lifestyle”—  were, in fact, direct quotes from the production’s director, Joel Ferrell, that Mary Clark found in an interview with him elsewhere.

On a personal note, let me say this: I would not EVER presume to critique a theatrical performance or a movie or a restaurant or a theater/movie/restaurant critic. I would totally suck at that. I mean, I loved Sharknado and potato chips and some beef jerky from the corner convenience store are my idea of fine dining. So I don’t feel comfortable criticizing either Mary Clark’s review of the show, Arnold Wayne Jones’ review of the show or of Mary Clark’s review, nor do I feel qualified to comment on John Garcia’s complaint that it is unheard of for one critic to so publicly criticize another’s work.

Here is Mary L. Clark’s response:

Hey Arnold, I got home late yesterday evening and had a call concerning your commentary on and the comments posted afterward. Was surprised to say the least and thought it a good idea to go over some things.

First, I didn’t know you read any of The Column’s reviews, so thank you for reading mine. Yes, I am a true Mrs. Malaprop — I did mean “free love” — thanks for the correction.

As for culling from Wikipedia, well not really, but facts are facts. I read several articles on The Rocky Horror Show and, as you read our reviews, you’ve certainly noticed they often include the history of a play or musical as our readers appreciate some background on a piece.

That you didn’t like my writing style, I can’t help you there. We all have our own opinions and I thank you for yours. You wrote your review on the basis of being a gay man and I wrote mine on the basis of not seeing any labels at all.

Apologies to Foe Destroyer — I have a friend named Zoe, and even after proofing three times, the word just went by me. Even you made the same error Arnold, and that’s all it was, a human error.

But now, to the real reason you wrote your commentary, my using the words “lifestyle” and “choice”.

I can see where you would think I meant being gay is a choice. Of course it’s not.

No, the word “choice” refers to being open to one’s beliefs, sexuality, or anything. The word lifestyle is defined as “the habits, attitudes, tastes, moral standards, etc. that together constitute the mode of living of an individual or group”.

To choose to live your life openly as a gay person is a lifestyle, and that is how I used it. Throughout my adult life I’ve heard many friends and others who are gay talk of it being their lifestyle. I cannot be sorry, as that means that I was at fault. I can, however, apologize if my choice of the words offended you.

The information I got on Joel Ferrell’s vision and choices in directing the musical came from an interview in another magazine where he says, “… we’re going to work to confuse you on gender identity as much and in as many ways as we possibly can”.

Me saying, “I never thought about gender equality when seeing Rocky Horror” means just that. In the 20+ times I’ve watched the film, never once did I view it as a banner for homosexuality. I saw it as a crazy, fun movie about people who weren’t afraid to be who they wanted to be and reveled in their differences. Early college days and being in theatre is a great time to learn about that!

Arnold, you forgot to include that my statement “don’t be worried you are going to be pro-gay rallied or asked to make any choices other than to have a really good time” came AFTER I wrote about the film, and now musical, not offending me, and that we see wilder things on TV, in video games and in magazines. But after my description of the characters, the costumes, and some of the scenes, I did not want our readers to think DTC is rallying around homosexuality any more than they are rallying around heterosexuality . . . and isn’t that the point after all, and what Ferrell was after, to blur the lines?

And here is a good place to note that only you used the phrase “catch gay”. I found it interesting that so many of people that commented jumped on the same phrase, the phrase only you used.

I’m not upset about your commentary. Thank god for free speech. What made me sad, though, were comments made by several people I met after the musical. I’m disappointed that my true self and my beliefs were not reflected in all the fun we were having talking about the show, the clothes everyone was wearing, and the audience reactions. That they met me, hopefully formed some opinion of me, but then made inaccurate decisions about me based on your commentary is truly the saddest part of it all. Oh, what the power of speech can do indeed.

Regards to all,

Mary L Clark

(And yes, Kent Boyer, I worked for Dallas Voice, mainly writing theatre reviews and one huge feature article on being a production assistant for the JFK film while here. So that would be around 1988 – 1990.)

—  Tammye Nash