BREAKING: DTC wins Regional Theatre Tony

This just in from Brad Pritchett, director of marketing and communications for Dallas Theater Center (and DVtv host):

Dallas Theater Center has won the 2017 Regional Theatre Tony Award. Brad said on Facebook, “We will be receiving the 2017 Regional Theatre Tony Award in New York City on June 11 and I couldn’t be more proud of our staff, our board, our artists and our audiences. For those of you who don’t know what this means, it’s like the Superbowl, Oscars or Grammy’s for theater. It’s huge. Like real huge.”

Congrats to Brad and all our friends at DTC.

—  Tammye Nash

Appreciation: Rene Moreno, 1959–2017

MorenoThere’s a secret in the restaurant business that a lot of chefs can flambe cherries jubilee or bananas foster tableside, and many can toss around their knives like a magician in a side show, but when you wanna hire someone to run your kitchen, you ask him to cook an egg. Flamboyance is great and showmanship is wonderful, but mastering simplicity is the true sign of talent.  Can’t cook a measly egg? You’re all sizzle, no steak.

The same holds for a number of disciplines, not the least among them the craft of theater. I’ve seen directors crash chandeliers and fly helicopters and I’ve thought “Wow.”  But until you’ve seen a director who can break your heart and make you smile simultaneously while showing you an awkward Irish couple navigate their feelings for each other,  or gasp at the humor and humanity of an octogenarian and his prickly relationship with a young gay man, you don’t know what great directing means.

Rene Moreno directed Outside Mullingar and Visiting Mr. Green and dozen of other plays during his illustrious career. And damn, that man could cook an egg.

I first encountered Moreno as an actor. It was nearly 25 years ago I saw him in a minor role in Dallas Theater Center’s production of A Christmas Carol, and  he stood out — not because he used a wheelchair, but because he grabbed your attention. He made an impact as an actor — in the Dallas-filmed movie Late Bloomers, on Broadway in the original run of Amadeus (before the accident that paralyzed his legs), even in a late-career return to the stage as the title villain in Richard III — but his true calling was really behind the scenes. It probably wasn’t long after that Christmas Carol that he ventured into directing full-time, starting in 1996 with Miss Julie. He took to it like a duck to water. What was that mystical conjuring that allowed him to extract such painfully beautiful performances out of any cast of actors he blessed with his touch? He could turn a seemingly mild comedy-drama like Good People into something profound; in my review, I noted it was “directed, as always, with deft understanding for the subtleties of humanity by Rene Moreno.” That was it, all the time. He knew the human psyche so intimately, he was able to coax out breathtaking work — not just from actors, but designers, too. His prowess at storytelling was legendary. He could tackle massive American dramas like Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf and August: Osage County with brilliance, spin back to adapting a Restoration comedy like The Lucky Chance to swingin’ Mod London with light-footed farce, turn to a chamber comedy-drama like The Trip to Bountiful and manage to helm a Strindberg to rarefied heights. He wove the most exquisite tapestry of life, one where you never saw the seams.

So when word broke late Tuesday that Moreno, who had undergone recent surgeries, has succumbed to a heart attack in the hospital, it didn’t just feel like the Dallas theater community had lost as artist; it felt like the soul of all North Texas had been somehow vanquished.

In a region flush with amazing theater professionals, from actors to directors to producers, musicians and designers, I don’t think anyone would disagree that Rene Moreno was nonpareil — not merely the best of the best, but virtually peerless. He had the incredible ability to elevate everyone in a show he was in charge of. (He won more Dallas-Fort Worth Theater Critics Forum Awards than I can count.)

“WaterTower Theatre Board and Staff offer their deepest condolences to the friends and family of René Moreno,” Gregory Patterson, managing director at WTT, messaged me. “Rene was a longtime colleague of WaterTower’s and he will be greatly missed by all. Our thoughts and prayers are with the DFW theatre community as we mourn the loss of this great artist.”

“It’s an extraordinary loss,” Susan Sargeant, founder of WingSpan Theatre Co., told me. “My heart aches.” (Moreno’s final directorial effort, WingSpan’s staged reading of Rose, will proceed as planned this weekend at the Bath House Cultural Center.)

But it wasn’t just that he was a director, but a consumer of theater. I last saw Moreno — whom I count as a personal friend (our birthdays were just days apart — both Geminis, which Rene found humorous) — watch a show a few weeks ago. We chatted that he was undergoing several surgeries; he seemed upbeat but a bit sanguine as well at the prospect. Still, the heart attack at age 57 that took his life following, reportedly, a recent back surgery, came as a shock. The outpouring of grief on social media was immense, with condolences conveyed to his longtime partner, Charles McMullen.

Perhaps it was his comparative youth, or the suddenness, or the realization of the loss of his good humor, that surprised people most. But speaking personally, it feels deeper than mere loss. Rene Moreno was an authentic genius of his craft whose work transformed all who saw it. The cost feels incalculable.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

BREAKING: DTC’s 2017-18 season sets the model for future years

Brandon Potter, who stepped in as a last-minute replacement as LBJ last year for the joint Alley-DTC production of ‘All the Way,’ returns to the role next season for ‘The Great Society.’ Photo by Karen Almond.

In a free-wheeling discussion about the arts scene and his plans for the future, Kevin Moriarty announced the lineup of shows for the 2017-18 season at the Dallas Theater Center — his tenth since taking over as artistic director of the company.

Four shows — Hair, Frankenstein, The Great Society and The Trials of Sam Houstonhad already been announced, though their run date were not known. We now know the schedule: Hair, at the Wyly Sept. 22–Oct. 22; Frankenstein, at the Kalita Feb. 2–March 4, 2018; The Great Society, the follow-up to last season’s All the Way, back at the Wyly March 9–April 1 (with much of the same cast from All the Way, including star Brandon Potter, returning); and the world premiere of Aaron Loeb’s The Trials of Sam Houston, about two important but largely unknown facts about one of the founders of Texas, at the Kalita April 20–May 1. In addition, as usual A Christmas Carol will return as an extra no including in season tickets. That will return to the Wyly Nov. 22–Dec. 28, with Lee Trull directing.

The three un-announced mainstage shows will alternate between the Kalita and the Wyly, including the Wyly’s smaller Studio Theatre which will be expanded to accommodate up to 150 patrons. (Its current capacity is 99 seats.)

The season kicks off this summer with Miller, Mississippi, a world premiere from playwright Boo Killebrew, spanning the Civil rights Movement as seen from a white family and their African-American servant. It will be in the Studio Theatre Aug. 30–Oct. 1. Following Hair, and concurrent with Carol, they will return to the studio with Fade, about a Latina writer hired on for a TV show, who finds herself more drawn to the studio’s Hispanic janitor than that bullpen of white male writers. It plays Dec. 6–Jan. 7.

Next up will be Frankenstein, Great Society and Sam Houston, and the season will end with White Rabbit Red Rabbit, one of the most controversial and mysterious plays in the world today. Why? Because no one is allowed to talk about. The author, Nassim Soleimanpour, is Iranian and now living in exile. He wrote the allegorical play, which does involve, at some level, a rabbit or two, to comment on Iranian oppression. The secret is, no performance is exactly the same. Each show has a different act cast in the one-man show, and that actor has not seen the script or know anything about it before it is handed to him when he walks onstage. He (or she!) is then required to perform everything in the play until the end 80 minutes later. The audience is also deeply involved. (Think of The Crying Game meets Groundhog Day set in a puzzle room.) That will be in the studio May 30–July 1.

In addition, DTC will continue with its Public Works Project, which seeks to perform Shakespeare with a mix of professional and community actors in a series of free performances. The first such show in the project, The Tempest, will take place this Friday through Sunday; next season it will be The Winter’s Tale, Aug. 31–Sept. at the Wyly.

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Jonathan Norton

Moriarty maintains that this line up should set the standard for the next few seasons: Seven mainstage productions in the studio and Rose Hall of the Wyly, alternating with the Kalita; and as many as three bonus/add-on shows outside of the subscription for a total of 10 productions a year. Moriarty also wants to include a family-friendly musical to be staged each summer at the Wyly. (The world premiere Hood will probably fit that bill this summer; nothing is yet scheduled for 2018.)

In addition, queer playwright Jonathan Norton (Mississippi Goddam) will have his specially-commissioned piece, Penny Candy — about his childhood in Pleasant Grove — as part of the 2018–19 season, probably arriving around October 2018. Two other local playwrights, Matt Lyle and Steven Walters, are also working on commissions.

For more information, visit DallasTheaterCenter.org.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

REVIEW: DTC’s feminist ‘Christmas Carol’

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Sally Nystuen Vahle as Scrooge (Photo by Karen Almond)

Ebenezer Scrooge’s name immediately conjures a dour, angular, mean physicality. You can see his pointy chin, his narrow, flinty eyes, his thin-lipped scowl.

Only the Scrooge at the Wyly Theatre now, courtesy of Dallas Theater Center‘s annual production of A Christmas Carol, isn’t a he at all, but a she. It’s not just gender-blind casting: DTC has had women play Jacob Marley before, as well as a host of the Ghosts of Christmases, and Tiny Tim is often played by a little girl. No, this Ebenezer definitely has two X chromosomes — “Miss Scrooge,” her terrified workers call her. He last surviving relative isn’t Nephew Fred, but Niece Lucy; even the Fezziwigs appear to be a partnership.

Hey, Hillary mightn’t’ve risen to the top, but these revisionist Dickens characters have.

And it definitely adds a new layer to the psychology of Scrooge.

How he got to think of holidays as a humbug has never fully wrung true. Yes, young Scrooge was abandoned by a remote dad, and he lost his devoted sister Fanny; even his fiancee abandoned him. But only after money had driven him cold. His miserliness drove people away, not the other way around.

But now, we see Miss Scrooge as the embodimentliz-mikel-gabrielle-reyes-ace-anderson-chamblee-ferguson-photo-by-karen-almond of The Bitch Conundrum: A powerful man is seen as decisive; a powerful woman as a bitch. Breaking that glass ceiling was sure to imbed some shards.

It’s a lovely little twist on the familiar tale, given a lot of life by Sally Nystuen Vahle as the top-hatted Ebby with perpetual smirk. Kevin Moriarty has updated his adaptation, jointly presenting the dual crises of the Industrial Revolution and the Sexual Revolution — Ebenezer Steinem, by way of The Jungle. The cold, heartless weight of the age linger more than even prior versions of this production, and not always in a good way. Bob Cratchit (here more foreman than bookkeeper, played by Alex Organ) all but disappears into the background of steam engines and furnaces; during the opening scenes, you even lose some dialogue to all the busy-ness on the stage.

But it does provide a striking counterpoint when the set begins to twinkle in colored lights and smiling harmonies as Miss Scrooge’s heart melts away. I see it every year, and every year it gets to me.

Vahle is terrific, of course, by so in Chamblee Ferguson, taking on a variety of small roles (Scrooge’s valet, Mr. Fezziwig, etc.) and proving how brilliant character work doesn’t depend on lots of lines, but rather inventive choices. He, like this version of the show itself, proves that there’s always room to be surprised.

At the Wyly Theatre through Dec. 28.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Best Bets • 05.06.16

Friday 05.06 — Saturday 05.14

Deferred-Action

DTC, Cara Mia cross the border with ‘Deferred Action’

What happens to a DREAM Act deferred? Does it dry up like a raisin in the sun? That’s the question posed by the world premiere play Deferred Action, a co-venture of the Dallas Theater Center and Cara Mia Theatre Co. Locally developed by authors David Lozano and Lee Trull, the play explores the effect of the federal immigration DREAM Act and how its enforcement affects undocumented aliens and their families.

DEETS:
Wyly Theatre
2400 Flora St.
Through May 14.
DallasTheaterCenter.org

Saturday 05.07

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TITAS celebrates dance with annual Command Performance Gala and dinner

Every season, TITAS imports some of the most innovative, new and storied dance companies in the world for months-worth of magic. But every spring, you get a sort of chef’s selection of the cream of the crop at the Command Performance Gala, which invites artists back to deliver a slate of amazing performance. This year’s line-up includes performers from MOMIX, Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, the Joffrey Ballet and more. It’s a once-a-year extravaganza.

DEETS:
Winspear Opera House
2403 Flora St.
7 p.m.
ATTPAC.org

Sunday 05.08

Womens-Chorus-of-Dallas

Celebrate Mother’s Day with Women’s Chorus of Dallas

Mother’s Day is almost upon us, and so is the Women’s Chorus of Dallas’ annual spring concert, this year entitled Voices of Wonder. The outdoor concert at Fair Park’s Texas Discovery Gardens combines nature and formal music performances as well as a butterfly release. In addition, this year marks the inauguration of a shorter matinee concert, starting at noon.

DEETS:
Texas Discovery Gardens
3601 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.
Noon and 2 p.m.
TheWomensChorusOfDallas.com

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition May 6, 2016.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Magic Johnson?

LBJ goes ‘All the Way,’ but DTC’s staging is a disappointing tragedy of errors

Brandon-PotterIt’s a tenet of criticism that you can only review the thing in front of you. The cake is stale, the piano is out of tune, the soprano has laryngitis? It doesn’t make any difference how well-intentioned the artists involved are — if they give you lemons, you don’t get to make lemonade.

It’s with that in mind that Dallas Theater Center’s production of All the Way stands as one of the most frustrating shows of the current season: A play that, as written, is full of good, relevant ideas — it’s about the first year of LBJ’s presidency, when he was running for his party’s nomination while trying to force the 1964 Civil Right Act through a hostile Congress — but this production is a complete mess, staged with such disregard for its audience’s attention span as to almost feel insulting.

Directed by Kevin Moriarty, the artistic director of the Dallas Theater Center, it opened last month at Houston’s Alley Theatre (the first such co-production between the two Texas regional powerhouses). Perhaps that space was more conducive to Moriarty’s blocking decisions, but in the thrust configuration of the Wyly Theatre’s Potter Rose Hall, it feels almost like he’s thumbed his nose intentionally at season ticket-holders. Seated in the third row of the orchestra, I watched the entire production behind a phalanx of bulky, unnecessary wicker chairs. It might as well have been a radio play for great swaths of dialogue (and there is lots of dialogue) as Moriarty peculiarly sets two-thirds of the action at or near the proscenium line of the stage. I’m not sure what compulsion forces theater directors to place the action as far from the seats as humanly possibly; you’d think they would take full advantage of the benefits of flexible configurations to bring the actor close to those paying their salaries.

Then again, the choice in this case could be justified for one good reason: to hide from sharp-eyed patrons the appalling amateurish makeup (lace-front toupees to beat the band! Get a drag queen in the dressing rooms to show them how to do this right) and ill-fitting, frumpy costumes, riddled with bad hems and ratty fabrics. (I hope the real president of the U.S. doesn’t give stump speeches with moth-eaten holes in his trousers.) And for this privilege you get to sit in the notorious Wyly chairs, which, if I’m not mistaken, are what Donald Trump had in mind when he said he’d bring back water-boarding “and worse” to torture Gitmo inmates. (“I confess! I kidnapped the Lindbergh baby and conspired to shoot JFK! Just please give me a shorter first act!!!”)

Screen shot 2016-03-10 at 11.58.35 AMIn order to squeeze all these missteps into a lean three hours, Moriarty also employs the most overused tropes of modern theatrical staging: Deafening and sudden music cues to separate scenes (it’s meant to seem cinematic — the live-action equivalent of film editing — but after a decade of this gimmick, it feels more like auditory manhandling), and on-set projections to spell out the times and dates of key events. Look, no one appreciates being well-oriented in a story’s timeline better than I do, but when we’re forced to read “eleven months … until election….” “ten months…,” “seven” every three minutes, you’re not adding anything that focuses our attention or adds real value. The entire play takes place over a mere 50 weeks; I think I got this time thing covered.

So, those are all the ways that All the Way goes wrong with staging; then we have the casting conundrums. I’m all in favor of local casting — most of the 17 actors here are culled from the resident acting companies of the DTC and the Alley — but this one feels cobbled together. Martin Luther King Jr. was 35 years old during all the events portrayed, but actor Shawn Hamilton looks at least a decade older, and despite a pencil moustache, totally ignores King’s vocal richness: The honeyed baritone, the preacher’s pacing. There’s very little in terms of attempted impersonation. Compare that with Michael Brusasco as George Wallace, who seems like a MadTV version of the racist cracker — a performance that’s all bad wig and cornpone clichés without any subtlety. (Quite a few of the over-the-top accents, gimmicky tics and exaggerated reactions elicited titters from the audience opening night.)

In some ways, it’s hard to fault the actors, almost all of whom play two and three characters apiece. They have scant seconds to sputter and blink their eyes after having been berated by the volatile, paranoid bully who was Lyndon Baines Johnson. As played by Brandon Potter, he’s part sociopath, part master politician. (Is there a difference?) He treats everyone from Lady Bird to J. Edgar Hoover with a rollercoaster of sweet cajoling and spewed invectives. I can’t tell if it’s a complex portrait of a man in all his moods or a salad of random ideas tossed with a tangy vinaigrette.

I suspect that the author, Robert Schenkkan (who won a Tony Award for All the Way and is a native Texan), cobbled together the most complete portrait of that man he could, given limitations of a work of theater (he didn’t have Robert Caro’s gift of 3,000 pages of historical research to develop the character). He presents a warts-and-all portrait of the man as a craven manipulator but also a principled liberal, who would do whatever he could to achieve his goals. In that way, it plays like Richard III with an air of sympathy. And Schenkkan inserts plenty of references to the art of the possible that play out with shockingly timely echoes of the current election cycle. It’s too bad all these good things are tied up in a bloated, loud and hopelessly opaque version. It reminds me of Will Rogers’ backhanded dictum: “I’m not a member of an organized political party — I’m a Democrat.” So, sadly, is this production.

— Arnold Wayne Jones

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition March 11, 2016.

Editor’s note: The actor playing Martin Luther King was incorrectly identified in the print edition. The corrected credit has been made here.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Best Bets • 02.26.16

Friday 02.26—Saturday 02.27

Black-Dance

Black Academy of Arts and Letters presents 12th annual Festival of Black Dance Weekend

Jamaica’s Stella Maris Dance Company returns to Dallas to share the spotlight with Atlanta Dance Connection, in it’s first Dallas appearance, at the Black Academy of Arts and Letters’ 12th annual Festival of Black Dance. The Stella Marris company will perform the specially commissioned spoken word piece, “My Language,” written by Curtis King.

DEETS:
Naomi Martin Main Stage
605 S. Griffin St. 8 p.m.
Tickets are $10

Saturday 02.27

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‘Real Housewives’ star performing Saturday at The Brick

With six consecutive No. 1 dance hits under her belt and a new album due out this spring, Erika Jayne is sure to get you in the mood to move. Dannee Phann Productions presents the Real Housewives of Beverly Hills star at The Brick, 2525 Wycliff Road. Doors open at 9 p.m.; the show starts at midnight and will be followed by
a meet-and-greet with Jayne.

DEETS:
General admission tickets are $20 in advance.
VIP table for three packages are $150, and table seating only is $30 per person.
OneNightInBangkok.org

Thursday 03.03

Brandon-Potter-and-Cast-of-All-the-Way---Photo-by-Karen-Almond

Dallas Theater Center and Alley Theatre present All The Way

Dallas Theater Center presents, in a co-production with Alley Theatre, a “Texas-sized” production of All The Way, Robert Schenkkan’s fascinating portrait of Lyndon B. Johnson, from the moment of his accidental presidency in 1963 to his landslide election a year later. Directed by DTC’s Kevin Moriarity, the show features actors from both DTC and the Alley Theatre in Houston.

DEETS:
It opens Thursday in Dallas after a successful run in Houston, and continues through March 27.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition February 26, 2016.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

BREAKING: DTC announces 2016-17 season

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Doug Beane

Kevin Moriarty, artistic director of the Dallas Theater Center, revealed a nine-show season (seven mainstage, two “extras”) this morning, including a remarkable two world premiere musicals.

The season kicks off with Nick Payne’s Constellations (Aug. 24–Oct. 9, at the Wyly), a romantic drama that plumbs issues of life, the universe and everything in 75 stark minutes. It will be directed by Wendy Dann.

Next up is the first premiere musical, written by an alumna of DTC: Bella: An American Tall Tale (Sept. 22–Oct. 23, at the Wyly) by Kirsten Childs (co-lyricist on DTC’s Peter Pan musical Fly). A co-production with Playwrights Horizons in New York, the musical comedy — set in the Old West, and featuring the adventures of a young black woman and the characters she meets — will be directed by the acclaimed gay playwright and director Robert O’Hara (Bootycandy).

That’l be followed by the annual bonus show A Christmas Carol (Nov. 23–Dec. 28, at the Wyly), this time directed by Dallas theater stallwart Steven Michael Walters.

The final show of 2016 — and the first of 2017 — is … well, a secret. Suffice it for now to say it’s an exciting and contemporary urban comedy, running Dec. 7–Jan. 22 in the Wyly’s Studio space. (We’ll announce the name some time next month.)

That mystery show is followed by The Christians (Jan. 26–Feb. 19, at the Kalita), Lucas Hnath’s volative, buzzed-about look at a megachurch and a rift occasioned, in part, by same-sex marriage. Joel Ferrell will direct.

Another bonus show will be something on the deeply experimental side. Moriarty is adapting Eruipides’ lurid revenge play Electra … and it will be very outre. First, it will be performed at AT&T’s outdoor Annette Strauss Square adjacent to the Winspear. Second, Moriarty is still toying with how he will stage it — moving the audience around the grounds to follow the action and using earbuds to “whisper” a Greek chorus into the audience members’ ears are just some of the possible outcomes. “You can see how this could be a disaster,” Moriarty said. It will run Aug. 4–May 28, 2017, with a late start time (8:30 p.m.) so that it will be performed in the dark.

Next is the classic play Inherit the Wind (May 16–June 18, at the Kalita), about the 1924 Scopes Monkey Trial … only it won’t be set in the past, apparently. Moriarty, who is also directing this one, promises edgy casting decisions and innovating concepts like nothing you’ve seen at the Kalita.

The season will conclude with the second world premiere musical, a comic riff on the Robin Hood myth called Hood (June 29–Aug. 6, in the Wyly). It’s being written by the husband-and-husband team Douglas Carter Beane (pictured) and Lewis Flinn, who last teamed up for DTC’d Give It Up (which moved to Broadway renamed Lysistrata Jones). Beane will direct.

The current season isn’t over, though. All the Way, DTC’s co-production will Houston’s Alley Theatre about LBJ, will move up to the Wyly next month (March 3–27), followed by the world premiere of Deferred Action (April 20–May 14) and finally Dreamgirls (June 10–July 24).

Season subscriptions start at $140 for the seven-show mainstage season, and design-your-own subscriptions start at $60 for three shows. Visit DallasTheaterCenter.org.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Best Bets • 02.05.16

Friday 02.05

BowieHung2

Texas Theatre, Cine Wilde team for screening and party of ‘The Hunger,’ honoring David Bowie

The death of the pioneering artist David Bowie continues to resonate, and Cine Wilde — the monthly gay film fest — has paired up again with Texas Theatre to screen one of his most outrageous and stylish films, Tony Scott’s 1983 film The Hunger. Bowie and Catherine Deneuve play modern-day vampires in a cat-and-mouse pursuit of Susan Sarandon. The screening with be followed by a after-party featuring punkish DJ music. Come ready to dance.

DEETS:
The Texas Theatre
231 W. Jefferson Blvd.
9:20 p.m. screening;
11 p.m. after-party
thetexastheatre.com/movies-events/the-hunger

Friday 02.05 — Sunday 02.28

Dallas-Theater-Center-01-29-16

Dallas Theater Center revisits the Bard with ‘Romeo & Juliet’

For the first four full seasons with Artistic Directed Kevin Moriarty, the Dallas Theater Center performed one of Shakespeare’s plays — a comedy, a history, a tragedy and a so-called romance — each season. The tradition dropped off, though, after King Lear. Well, it’s back, with another of the major tragedies, Romeo & Juliet. Unlike the last four, Moriarty isn’t directing this one (that role falls to the talented Joel Ferrell) and it moves from Downtown’s Wyly Theatre back to the DTC’s Uptown haunts at the Kalita Humphreys.

DEETS:
Kalita Humphreys Theater
3636 Turtle Creek Blvd.
DallasTheaterCenter.org

Saturday 02.13

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BalletBoyz dance troupe makes its Dallas debut with graceful muscularity

With its innovative combination of weightless elegance and brute muscularity, the U.K.’s BalletBoyz is one of the most intensely exciting dance troupes in the world today. The company makes its Dallas debut on Feb. 13 with a sensual performance at the Winspear. This may be the most anticipated local premiere of TITAS’ all-dance season.

DEETS:
Winspear Opera House
2403 Flora St.
8 p.m.
ATTPAC.org

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition February 5, 2016.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

DTC collects more than $138K for NTFB

NTFB Check Presentation - Photo by Dana Driensky (2)

DTC staff presenting check to the NTFB, where many staffers volunteered

For the eighth year, the Dallas Theater Center has taken up donations for the North Texas Food Bank during every performance of his annual holiday show A Christmas Carol. This year’s run of the show netted $138,020.69 for the food pantry, including a $57,000 block donation from an anonymous donor. That pays for nearly half a million meals for those with food insecurity across the Metroplex.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones