32 years of Dallas Voice now available online

University of North Texas digitized and put online 32 years of Dallas Voice from Volume 1, Issue 1 as part of its North Texas LGBT history archives. UNT also has been working on the project in conjunction with The Dallas Way and Resource Center, which donated its Phil Johnson Archives.

Thousands of pages of Dallas Voice articles and ads are searchable. The UNT library began the project with Dallas Voice about three years ago. Money for digitizing was finally raised last summer and the school has been working on the project since then.

So when we were looking for Senior Editor Tammye Nash’s first story, we came up with this beauty:

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Here’s the link to search Dallas Voice in the UNT archives.

This was our first front page:

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And one more. Judge Jerry Buchmeyer overturned 21.06, the Texas sodomy law but this is how we showed outrage at the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals reinstating the now-unconstitutional law:

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These are screen shots, but the originals are very readable. Take a walk through the past 32 years by searching beginning here.

—  David Taffet

Dallas Voice signed amicus brief

amicus briefEven though the hearing is over and an expected two month wait has begun, I just learned Dallas Voice signed an amicus brief to Obergefell v. Ohio, the marriage equality case.

The brief was signed by 379 business across the country. Dallas Voice is the only LGBT publication among the signers.

Major North Texas-based businesses on the list are American Airlines, AT&T and Kimberley-Clark. No, ExxonMobil, surprisingly, isn’t there.

Several other small businesses from the area are also among the signers including Law Office of Lorie L. Burch PC, David Mack Henderson Income Tax Preparation, Steve Graves Insurance Agency, Stonewall Behavioral Health and Uptown Physicians Group.

The North Texas GLBT Chamber of Commerce and the Austin Gay and Lesbian Chamber of Commerce are two of several local LGBT chambers to sign.

No Texas sports franchises are includes. The New England Patriots is the only professional sports team listed.

The brief’s theme is business benefits from diversity.

“To reap the rewards of diversity, employers need to be able to recruit and retain top talent, in part though equitable and competitive benefits packages,” the brief states.

“Employees in same-sex relationships receive varying, if any, access to the rights, benefits and privileges that different-sex couples enjoy,” it says.

The brief concludes, “marriage discrimination injures amici’s [signers] businesses.”

—  David Taffet

Austin, Dallas, Fort Worth top Texas cities in HRC Municipal Equality Index

MEI-2014-map-650x375The Human Rights Campaign released its third annual Municipal Equality Index today (Wednesday, Nov. 12) assessing LGBT equality in 353 cities across the nation, including 22 in Texas, according to a press release from HRC.

The MEI, the only nationwide rating system of LGBT inclusion in municipal law and policy, assesses cities on a one to 100 scale.

The average score for the 22 Texas cities is 28 out of 100 points, far below the national average of 59. Only Austin achieved a perfect 100 score. Dallas came in second with 91 points and Fort Worth third with 83 points.

San Antonio, El Paso and Houston earned scores of 72, 52 and 54 respectively, the only other cities to score more than 50 points.

Other surveyed Texas cities included Amarillo: 14,  Brownsville: 20, Corpus Christi: 16, Killeen: 10, Laredo: 2, Lubbock: 0, McAllen: 0, Pasadena: 10, Waco: 24.

The MEI rates cities based on 47 criteria falling under six broad categories: Non-discrimination laws, relationship recognition, employment policies, including transgender-inclusive insurance coverage, contracting non-discrimination requirements, and other policies relating to equal treatment of LGBT city employees, inclusiveness of city services, fair law enforcement practices and leadership on matters of equality.

Check out the full list here and this week’s edition of the Voice for comments from local leaders.

—  James Russell

Welcome aboard, Erin Moore

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We are thrilled to welcome aboard the newest addition to the Dallas Voice family, graphic artist Erin Moore.

That name may sound — probably does sound — familiar. That’s because Erin has been an active member of DFW’s LGBT community for years. She has been president of Dallas Gay and Lesbian Alliance, president of Stonewall Democrats of Dallas and vice president of Stonewall Democrats of Texas.
Erin’s also served on the Human Rights Campaign’s national Board of Governors and co-chaired National Coming Out Day.She grew up in Slidell, La., and moved to Dallas in 1992 to be staff adviser to Southern Methodist University’s student newspaper the Daily Campus. From there she began doing layout and design for Texas Lawyer and most recently worked at Brown & Partners designing jewelry advertising for national clients. Erin’s partner, Patti Fink, is currently president of DGLA and hosts the show that Dallas Observer named best talk show in Dallas, Lambda Weekly.

—  Tammye Nash

Get your collectible Dallas Voice Pride Edition — 3 covers to choose from!

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Here at Dallas Voice, we’ve done something for Pride Weekend we’ve never done before: We are offering readers three versions of the Voice to read in one week.

Now, the content inside is the same. There’s coverage of the upcoming Gay Softball World Series, a calendar of Pride events to take you through the fall, some thought-provoking opinion pieces, telling interviews with musicians Andy Butler and Jennifer Hudson as well as a piece on how Stoli is making a push into the gay market again following its Olympics disaster.

But on the outside? Three different full-color glossy covers reflecting three sides of Pride. Check them all out! Thanks for your support, and Happy Pride!

 

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

The Move is on!

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Today (Friday, Aug. 29) is the big day here at Dallas Voice. We are packing our bags and moving across town to our new offices in the Design District — 1825 Market Center Blvd., Ste. 240, in the Chase Bank building at the corner of Market Center and Turtle Creek boulevards, to be exact.

So, as we are in the midst of the move, we may be (we will be) out of touch for a little bit. We just wanted to let you all know that if we don’t return an email or answer your call, it’s not because we are ignoring you. It’s just because our computers and/or our phones are enroute to our new offices and haven’t been set up yet.

So keep trying and be a little patient with us. We will be back up and running soon! And watch for our announcement of the open house to show off our new offices, which we will hold as soon as the dust settles!

Thanks, and see ya on the other side (of town).

—  Tammye Nash

Welcome back, Tammye

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Tammye Nash

Tammye Nash is the new senior editor of Dallas Voice. If the name sounds familiar, that’s because she’s also our old editor.

Tammye began writing for Dallas Voice in 1988. Then she left and came back, then she left, and this week she came back … to stay.

On her first day back in the office, she remembered some of the stories she worked on early in her career. She said she wrote a story called “The L Word” long before the Showtime TV series. Her story centered on Deb Elder and Kay Vinson’s fight to get the L into Dallas Gay Alliance.

Another first-year story centered on the old Crazy Crab on Oak Lawn Avenue. The building now houses Cyclone Anaya’s and Green Papaya. At the time, the building had been empty for more than a decade. A developer was working on renovating the building, but ran into some trouble — the building was haunted. Tammye said she participated in a séance the building owners performed. She said the evening was a lot of fun, but the club never opened and it was several more years before the building was occupied.

Over the years, Tammye covered a number of stories that were important to Dallas’ LGBT community. She covered Micah England’s quest to become a Dallas police officer at a time gays and lesbians were banned from the department. She covered the demonstrations against Judge Jack Hampton, who said he gave a murderer a lesser sentence because the victim was gay.

“And every week was about AIDS,” Tammye said.

She remembered two of her “starstruck” interviews — author Anne Rice and entertainer Eartha Kitt, whom she spoke to before an appearance at the Kalita Humphreys Theater.

In 2001, Tammye left Dallas Voice to work for  The Cleburne Times-Review daily newspaper and then moved on to become editor of the Red Oak Chronicle. When original Dallas Voice editor Dennis Vercher’s health began to suffer from his long battle with AIDS, she returned in 2004 and became editor after Dennis’ death.

She left again in 2012 to do some freelance work and again write for the Cleburne newspaper. But now she’s back and everything at Dallas Voice seems just right.

Tammye lives in Fort Worth with her wife, Sandra, and their two teenage sons. They also share their home with a Chihuahua named Tinkerbell, an 8-month-old German shepherd named Akasha and a weird weird cat called Wilford Brimley.

—  David Taffet

Turn on your AC and check out our swimsuit video

Our first swimsuit issue will be on the stands Friday. You’ll want to pick up two copies. One to look at and the other to fan yourself off with. It’s that hot. Check out our behind-the-scenes video we shot during the photo shoot.

—  Steve Ramos

Springtown man indicted on federal hate crime charges for gay man’s assault

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Brice Johnson

A Springtown man who allegedly lured a gay man to his home through a social media app has been indicted on federal hate crime charges for the man’s assault.

Brice Johnson, 19, was indicted Wednesday on charges of kidnapping and “willfully causing bodily injury to a person because of the actual or perceived sexual orientation of that person,” according to a news release from U.S. Attorney’s Office of the Northern District of Texas.

Johnson started chatting with Arron Keahey on the MeetMe app over Labor Day weekend. The two discussed sex and Johnson invited him over. When he arrived, Keahey was brutally beaten.

A criminal complaint back in February when Johnson was brought up on federal charges explains that Johnson put him in the back of a car and drove him to a friend’s house. Johnson’s friends later convinced him to take Keahey to the hospital, where he spent 10 days recovering from brain trauma and broken bones.

Johnson initially told Springtown police he found Keahey outside his house and took him to the hospital. He later told police he assaulted him after blacking out.

Johnson was originally charged with a state felony for aggravated assault.

In a recorded jail conversation to family, Johnson, who had Keahey listed in his cell phone as “fagg bagg,” said he invited Keahey over and it was “basically a joke that went too far and too wrong. I invited him over because he was a fag or whatever.”

The trial is set to begin June 20. If convicted, he faces a maximum of 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine.

—  Dallasvoice

Texas native and NFL hopeful Michael Sam talks nerves ahead of NFL draft

Screen shot 2014-05-07 at 1.04.39 PMMichael Sam hopes to make history Thursday as the first openly gay player in the NFL.

Sam, who came out earlier this year, spoke to Robin Roberts on Good Morning America Wednesday about the NFL draft and how anxious he is about the experience.

“I’ve been thinking about this moment since junior year in college,” Sam said. “It’s a very nervous time, an exciting time. So I’m ready for it.”

The former Missouri defensive end grew up in Hitchcock, Texas, said he doesn’t care which team selects him Thursday, as long as he can play in the NFL.

“Where I’ll go, it doesn’t matter, as long as I get to play and put a jersey on my back,” he said. “It’s just awesome. I’m going to be proud wherever I go.”

Sam is also being honored by ESPN with the Arthur Ashe Courage Award for “his courage and honesty that resonates beyond sports.”

Watch the interview below.

—  Dallasvoice