World AIDS Day event planned in Plano

Roseann Rosetti opening a Quilt panel

In addition to co-sponsoring the World AIDS Day event at the new Main Street Garden in Dallas, C.U.R.E. will host a commemoration in Plano.

Billed as a ceremony of healing and hope, the Plano gathering will remember people lost to AIDS. Panels from the AIDS Memorial Quilt will be on display. It takes place at Community Unitarian Universalist Church at 2875 East Parker Road. Plano-based Health Services of North Texas is also sponsoring.

“Our ceremony will include the dedication of new panels created by family and friends of a loved one lost to AIDS,” said C.U.R.E. co-founder Roseann Rosetti. “The new panels will be presented to The Names Project Foundation to be included as part of the nationally acclaimed AIDS Memorial Quilt.”

Anyone with a new panel to present may attend the ceremony.

“If you would like to present a panel in honor of someone you know and love, C.U.R.E. will be honored have you dedicate and present your panel at our World AIDS Day ceremony,” Rosetti said.

The panels will be sent to the Names Project’s home in Atlanta to be sewn into blocks for exhibit.

—  David Taffet

LSR Journal: 2 of a kind — but different

Paul Cross and Jim McCoy were single when they each started volunteering for Lone Star Ride Fighting AIDS; now as a couple, their dedication is renewed

Paul Cross, left, and Jim McCoy

M.M. Adjarian  |  Contributing Writer
editor@dallasvoice.com

If ever two people exemplified the idea of “different strokes for different folks,” it’s longtime Lone Star Ride Fighting AIDS supporters Paul Cross and Jim McCoy.

Each man loves to cycle, especially if he’s with the other. But as for the individual approaches Cross and McCoy take to bike riding — that’s another matter entirely.

Both men have either participated in or donated to the LSRFA since 2001, the year the ride began. In that inaugural ride, when both were still single, Cross served as a pit crew volunteer and McCoy cycled.

By 2003, however, the two bachelors had become life partners and rode together in LSRFA as a couple. Their commitment to each other took top priority after that.

“We had been meaning to get back to it [the ride] over the last three or four years,” says McCoy, a consultant in healthcare IT. “It’s just one of those things we had in common — our [desire to help] the community.”

Shared goals have made for a strong union between the two men. But it’s the differences that have kept their relationship consistently interesting. Take, for example, their divergent cycling styles.

“[After we got together,] people kind of laughed at us: They called us the Tortoise and the Hare,” McCoy says. “When I want to go fast, Paul goes slow. And then when Paul wants to go fast, I want to go slow.”

These differences in style translate into differences in perspective. If McCoy tends to be the one more eager to get from one point to another as quickly as possible, his partner takes special pleasure in smelling the proverbial roses along the way.

“I like to just ride and look around and just watch everything,” says Cross, a banker.

“But then when we get to a hill, I’m the one with the energy,” he adds with a certain smugness.

The behavior these 40-something partners display in the saddle could not be more dissimilar. Yet both men are alike in how they carry exceptionally painful memories of the devastation HIV/AIDS wrought in the gay community.

“One of the things I’ll remember throughout my life is when This Week in Texas came out and there were no obituaries to report,” says McCoy. “That was in the late 90s. For a long time [before that], you had pages and pages of obituaries.”

What they saw in the dangerous decades of the 1980s and ’90s has served as the impetus behind their participation not only in the LSRFA, but in other HIV/AIDS-related causes such as Cheer Dallas and the AIDS Life Walk.

“We’re not ‘going out’ people,” admits Cross.  “But where there’s a fundraiser or event, we’re definitely there.”

The Tortoise and the Hare still haven’t decided how many miles they’ll be doing together in this year’s Lone Star Ride Fighting AIDS: Tortoise says 180 and Hare says 150. Regardless of how far they plan to pedal or the approach each will take to reach the finish line, both are united in their belief that they’re cycling for a cause that matters.

Says McCoy, “With the way the economy is, there are a lot of people who need a lot of assistance. Programs are constantly getting cut.”

“Everyone seems to have put [HIV/AIDS] on the back burner like it’s not out there anymore, but it is,” adds Cross. “And we still need to raise awareness.”

Lone Star Ride Fighting AIDS will be held Sept. 24-25. To donate to an individual rider, to a team or to the Ride itself, go online to LoneStarRide.org.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition September 2, 2011.

—  Michael Stephens

BREAKING: Moncrief won’t seek re-election

Mike Moncrief

Mike Moncrief announced today that he won’t seek re-election to a fifth term as mayor of Fort Worth, according to the Star-Telegram.

Possible candidates to replace Moncrief include former councilmembers Cathy Hirt and Jim Lane, as well as Tarrant County Tax Assessor-Collector Betsy Price, according to the Star-Telegram.

Moncrief, of course, has led Fort Worth through the aftermath of the 2009 Rainbow Lounge raid.

The filing period for Fort Worth elections begins Monday.

—  John Wright

I have puppies on the brain today; you benefit

This morning I formally adopted my new dog, Gulliver, a lab/terrier mix who, at four months, is as gentle and well-behaved as my wily older dogs. This picture is Gulliver and me a few minutes ago — he already is more popular in the office than I am.

As any pet owner knows, once you get a new addition to the family, you become a bore — talking and thinking of nothing but your new four-legged companion. So when I had to leave him for a while today in the care of a colleague to attend the dedication of the Annette Strauss Artists Square, I ended up showing everyone I knew a picture of him (just like I did for you just now).

One friend I met at the dedication who I bored with assertions of his cuteness told me about a video called “dog prayer” that she thought I would enjoy. I did. So here it is. Keep in mind, I am not a religious person, but even I respect the devotion showed by this ol’ hound.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Pursuit of appiness

As iPhones become ubiquitous and indispensible, we ask: Has Steve Jobs become the Internet’s gay pimp?

STEVEN LINDSEY  | Contributing Writer stevencraiglindsey@me.com

iPhone
Hook ‘em Horney | Gay networking programs for the iPhone — including Grindr, PPX To-Go, Fabulis, DList, iDate Gay and Looking4LGBT —have made the hook-up almost too easy. What about buying me a drink first?

When I was first asked to write a story on gay applications for the Apple iPhone, I had no idea I’d turn into such a slut. Who knew what a disproportionate number of gay dating and social networking apps are available, compared to other LGBT program categories (or the same for straight people).

Still, although I’m happily married, I signed up for every gay dating/networking/hook-up site I could find. (Even the apps recommended to me when I contacted Apple fell into this category, so it’s obviously popular.)

With Steve Jobs as my virtual pimp, I’ve experienced plenty of highs, lows, rejected advances and a too-frequent-for-comfort request to wait naked in my pool while somebody sneaks in the back gate to “surprise” me.

Sorry, fellas, my dedication to journalistic research has its limits.

What follows is a catalogue of gay hook-up apps with the advantages and disadvantages discovered during my time as a cyber-whore and ranked on a scale of one to five “hooks.” (Because I’m being paid for this story, I think I’ve been downgraded from mere slut.) But the upside, I met a lot of nice people (guys and girls, when I was pretending to be a lesbian) and these apps do make connecting with people fun, easy … and shockingly time-consuming.

If you’re looking to connect with someone for just coffee or the chance at a delicious morning-after breakfast, download these apps. Best of all, they’re all free. And to MusclMusclMuscl214, if you’re reading this, my answer is “yes.”

Grindr

Grindr is the Kleenex of gay social networking apps — the one everyone knows about and nearly every gay with an iPhone uses, whether he admits it or not. The app loads 100 profiles (200 if you pay a $3 monthly fee) based on a guy’s relative distance to you.

Advantages: Tons of guys to choose from wherever you may roam (it’s the largest all-male location-based network in the world), easy-to-use interface.

Disadvantages: Few options to narrow search. Loading a few guys at a time can be a pain.

Rating: 4 out of 5 hooks

PURPLL

Though more people familiar with Grindr, Purpll was the first gay dating app for the iPhone. Includes local business listings, as well as a gay newsfeed similar to Facebook where you can spy on who became friends with whom … though why anyone would care is unclear. It may be the first, but far from the best.

Advantages: Ability to narrow down photos that are shown; lesbian profiles.

Disadvantages: A “Hot or Not” feature subjects people to being rated as good-looking or not resulting in an overall hotness rating. Beyond useless unless you only want to date guys or gals who are at least 86 percent hot.

Rating: 2 out of 5 hooks

QRUSHR/QRUSHR GIRLS

Everything I love about Grindr is amped up with Qrushr, plus they’ve got a version just for lesbians.

Advantages: Streaming radio (listen to dance music while you prowl!), magazine articles, multiple images per profile, very detailed profile information, fantastic search function.

Disadvantages: Group chat rooms are just plain annoying.

Rating: 5 out of 5 hooks

PPX TO-GO

Wow. If you’re looking for anything related to sex, this is your app. From hookups to paid entertainers, adult shops, peepshows and legal brothers, they’ve left no mattress unturned and no stripper pole unoccupied.

Advantages: Something for everyone. I’m surprised there isn’t a donkey-show-specific search function.

Disadvantages: You have to click on icons from a map, rather than an easier-to-use list or grid of available matches. Also, not too many people signed up yet, especially in Dallas. But give it time, this one could be huge.

Rating: 3 out of 5 hooks

DLIST

The popular DList.com website for gay men and their friends goes mobile.

Advantages: Integrates with the website so all your chatting doesn’t have to be done solely on your phone.

Disadvantages: No search functions at all — it just loads all profiles closest to you.

Rating: 3 out of 5 hooks

LOOKING4LGBT

If there’s such a thing as a homemade app, this one sure looks like it. Ugly interface, terrible logo and, from my tests, only four people in Dallas are on the app. The search options are by age, zodiac sign (what is this, 1972?) and body type.

Advantages: This is the only app I found that actually gave the option to identify as or search for M2F and F2M transsexuals, so it’s refreshingly progressive in that respect. Also appears to be more long-term-relationship oriented because one of the main questions asks whether or not you want children.

Disadvantages: Plenty. It’s rudimentary, clunky and there are very few active users.

Rating: 1 out of 5 hooks

SKOUT/BOY AHOY

These “sister” apps are both free, but to enjoy all the extra services (like sending “gifts” or “wink bombing” multiple people at once to maximize your chances of a response) you’ve gotta have points. And points cost money.

Advantages: Great search function. Narcissists and those truly desperate can be what I call “Featured Meat” (they call it “Look at Me”). Here you bid on prime position to get all the flirts you can handle. Private photos that you unlock for specific people. You know, so you can have naughty pics.

Disadvantages: Unexpected fees everywhere. This is an anything-goes dating app. Gay, straight, bi — they’re all here (unless you download the men-only Boy Ahoy, which features all the same functionality). Not sure that anyone would want their straight co-workers to easily view the sexual proclivities and innermost desires you’ve chosen to list on your profile. And Virtual Gifts are just plain stupid. What ever happened to buying someone a real drink, not an animated one?

Rating: 2 out of 5 hooks

iDATE GAY

The extremely user-friendly interface for both gays and lesbians makes this one a surprise hit. Fantastic search functions and plenty of information available — if only people fill out their profiles extensively.

Advantages: Multiple photos per profile, robust search options, quick-loading of hundreds of profiles.

Disadvantages: Crashes often. More of those stupid gifts that require a point purchase.

Rating: 4 out of 5 hooks

FABULIS

This isn’t a hook-up site in the traditional sense, but that does go on here, too. It’s worth inclusion, though, just because it’s so much fun. It ties in with your Facebook account (required) and allows you to interact with all your Facebook friends who are on Fabulis. You earn points by doing stuff (not paying) and you can use points to increase the worldwide Fabulis ranking of your friends.

Advantages: Area events are listed and friends can see which ones you plan to attend. The popularity contest aspect here is actually fun. How Fabulis are you compared to the rest of the world? Evidently, I’m the 3,012th most Fabulis gay in the village. Let’s get those votes in!

Disadvantages: Not specifically designed for hooking up, so advances could be quickly rejected. (But believe me, even here people are looking for action).
Rating: 5 out of 5 hooks

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition August 13, 2010.

—  Kevin Thomas