Resources for National Suicide Prevention Month

Bwi4qpCCUAEm1B1September is National Suicide Prevention Month. A recent issue of the Voice covered ways of identifying, coping and living with depression. You can read the story here.

We also provided an expansive list of resources, including emergency hotlines, LGBT-affirming faith groups, counselors and more. That list is reprinted below.

Did we miss a great resource? List it in the comments.

National Resources
• The Trevor Project:
866-488-7386
• National Suicide Prevention Hotline:
1-800-273-TALK (8255)
• NSPH’s Deaf Hotline:
1-800-799-4889
• GLBT National Help Center:
1-888-THE-GLNH (4564)

Local Community Resources
• Alcoholics Anonymous Lambda Group:
214-267-0222 or 214-887-6699
• G.E.A.R. (Gender Education, Advocacy and Resources):
214-528-0144
• Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance of Fort Worth and Tarrant County:
817-654-7100 or dbsa_fortworth@yahoo.com.
• Legacy Counseling, private and group sessions that include alcohol and substance
abuse programs for people with HIV:
214-520-6308
• Resource Center (in conjunction with SMU’s Master of Science Counseling Education Program):
214-393-3680
• AIDS Outreach Center/The Journey (support group for people living with HIV):
Brenda Wingo, 817-916-5217.
• AIDS Outreach Center/Mujeres Unida(for HIV-positive women, in Spanish):
Ana Colin-Hernandez, 817-916-5214.
• AIDS Outreach Center/Futuro Unidos(for HIV-positive men, in Spanish):
Bea Lampka at 817-916-5225
• AIDS Outreach Center/Man Talk (for HIV-positive gay and bisexual men):
Curtis Smith, 817-916-5219.
• Mental Health America Of Greater Tarrant County | Warm Line (non-crisis referral number, limited hours, 1-5 p.m.
Monday-Friday): 817-546-7826.
• MHMR of Tarrant County 24-hour Crisis Hotline:
1-800-866-2465 or 817-335-3022.
• The Suicide and Crisis Center of North Texas:
214-828-1000.

Local LGBT-Affirming Counselors
• Stonewall Behavioral Health:
214-521-1278, Stonewall@Stonewall-inc.com.
• Hall Counseling and Associates:
214-662-3523, dallasXian@aol.com.
• Beth Clardy Lewis, M.A., L.P.C.:
817-781-3735, bethlewistherapy@gmail.com.
• Cynthia Lovell, M.Ed., L.P.C.:
214-497-6268.
• Randy Martin, L.P.C.-S.:
214-392-8247, martinlpc@yahoo.com.
• Tammy Tips, M.A., L.P.C.: 817-300-8809.

Local Religious Resources
• Agape MCC (Fort Worth):
817-535-5002.
• Beth El Binah (Dallas):
214-500-8304.
• Cathedral of Hope (Dallas):
214-351-1901.
• Cathedral of Hope-Mid Cities (Hurst):
817-354-HOPE
• Celebration Community Church (Fort Worth):
817-335-3222
• Celebration on the Lake (Gun Barrel City):
903-451-2302.
• Crossroads Community Church (Dallas):
214-520-9090.
• Harvest MCC (Denton):
940-484-6159.
• Northaven UMC (Dallas):
214-363-2479.
• MCC Dallas:
972-243-0761.
• Oak Lawn UMC (Dallas):
214-521-5197.
• St. Thomas the Apostle Episcopal Church (Dallas):
214-352-0410.
• Trinity MCC (Arlington):
817-265-5454.

—  James Russell

(Midnite can now go) Walking after midnight

Midnite

We’ve published stories in Dallas Voice and here on Instant Tea about Ranch Hand Rescue, the gay-owned and -operated animal rescue operation out in Argyle, Texas. Bob Williams and his partner, Marty Polasko, take in animals of all kinds that have been abused and neglected, rehabilitating them and giving them someplace to live out their lives in comfort.

One of the rescue animals was a miniature named Midnite who has been having to navigate on three legs after losing part of his left rear leg to injury. On Sunday, Williams reports, Midnite received a prosthetic leg that allows him to actually run around the ranch.

Midnite came to Ranch Hand Rescue after being seized from his previous owner due to neglect. Williams said Midnite was underweight, malnourished and extremely depressed when he first arrived, in addition to missing a hoof and coffin bone, a condition that would have, under different circumstances, forced officials to euthanize the little horse. Instead, Midnite was moved to Ranch Hand Rescue where his lengthy, and costly, rehabilitation began. After the jump, Williams offers a description of that process:

—  admin

Weekly Best Bets

Friday 02.11

She works hard for the money
How Kander and Ebb combined fashion, Communism, the Depression and relationships set to music in Lyric’s Flora the Red Menace is beyond us, but we’re curious. Kristin Dausch plays Flora, who juggles her career as an artist against the temptations of her new love Harry. All while trying to earn a buck. You go girl.

DEETS: Irving Arts Center, 3333 N. MacArthur Blvd. Through Feb. 26. $18–$29. LyricStage.org.

Saturday 02.12

This Vanity project is worth it
Not to take away from their pop rock brand of music, but if there’s one reason to check out Vanity Theft, it’s because of the one-name bassist Lalaine. She’s says of the band, “We may have vaginas, but we’re not pussies.” Well, said. Now we hope that means they will kill it live, because their rock is pretty major.

DEETS: With Hunter Valentine. Sue Ellen’s, 3014 Throckmorton St. 9 p.m. Caven.com.

Thursday 02.17

Drums along the Winspear
TITAS brings in the famous Kodo drummers for a life-changing experience. The 24 drum masters take the instrument beyond its percussive musicality into a “heart-pounding, earth-shaking experience.” And it’s one night only — meaning don’t miss out.

DEETS: Winspear Opera House, 2403 Flora St. Feb. 17. 8 p.m. $19–$75. ATTPAC.org.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition Feb. 11, 2011.

—  John Wright

Remembering a friend and helping others

Friends of woman who committed suicide holding 2nd benefit for Foundation for Prevention of Suicide


Tammye Nash  |  Senior Editor
nash@dallasvoice.com

HAPPIER TIMES  |  Shauna Greaham seemed like ‘the perfect person’ to her friends, but in reality, she struggled throughout her adult life with depression. This weekend, her friends are holding an event in her memory to benefit the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention.
HAPPIER TIMES | Shauna Greaham seemed like ‘the perfect person’ to her friends, but in reality, she struggled throughout her adult life with depression. This weekend, her friends are holding an event in her memory to benefit the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention.

Kinita Albertson first met Shauna Greaham in high school, when the two played softball for opposing teams. Then the two women met again, this time as teammates, when they both played college softball for Texas Weslyan University.

Greaham was, Albertson said, “the perfect person, so amazing.”

But it only seemed that way.

Greaham committed suicide on Oct. 13, 2008.

Albertson said Greaham struggled with periodic bouts of depression throughout her adult life. Although Albertson said she never knew of her friend being bullied or harassed over being gay, Greaham wasn’t comfortable with her sexual orientation, either.

“When we were in college, she was embarrassed to be gay. She never talked about it or admitted it,” Albertson said. “Even after college, I would see her at the games [for the lesbian softball league], and she would say, ‘Oh, I’m just playing for the gay league because they needed more players.’”

Still, Greaham’s friends never expected her to take her own life.

“She had a girlfriend, but they were breaking up,” Albertson said, recalling the days leading up to her friend’s death. “We knew Shauna was upset and depressed, so we went over that weekend to spend some time with her. She seemed to be okay. Yes, she was upset, but by the time we left, she seemed okay. She was laughing and having a good time with everybody.

“And then, she was just gone,” Albertson continued. “Nobody really knows what happened. Something just snapped, and she was gone.”
And her friends were left with grief and questions.

“I had all the questions and nowhere to find answers. Even on the Internet, I had trouble finding any information. I had to dig. I was just grasping at straws as to why this happened,” Albertson said.

And then she found the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, and finally found some of the answers she was seeking.

“I found AFSP online, and I called and asked for information. They really did help,” Albertson said.

One of the things she learned, Albertson said, was not to give in to some of the common misperceptions about suicide.

“A lot of times, when someone commits suicide, people say that they just gave up, that they quit trying. It’s a lot more complicated than that. There aren’t such easy answers,” Albertson said. “That’s one thing I don’t want people to think about Shauna. She was an amazing person, and I don’t want anybody to think of her as a quitter.”

AFSP is a nonprofit organization “exclusively dedicated to understanding and preventing suicide through research, education and advocacy, and to reaching out to people with mental disorders and those impacted by suicide,” according to its website.

The agency works to meet its goals by funding scientific research, offering education programs for mental health professionals, working to educate the public about mood disorders and suicide prevention, promoting policies and legislation aimed at preventing suicide and offering programs and resources for those who have lost loved ones to suicide and those who are themselves at risk for suicide.

The organization also has a specific LGBTQ Initiative and in 2007 helped sponsor, in conjunction with the Gay and Lesbian Medical Association and the Suicide Prevention Resource Center, a conference on LGBTQ suicide. AFSP has since funded several grants related to the issue of LGBTQ teen suicide and is currently working to complete a review of research and recommendations on LGBTQ suicide and suicide risk, according to the website.

The organization is also actively involved in studying and publicizing the link between anti-LGBT bullying and suicide.

But all those efforts take money. That’s why Albertson and her friends this weekend will hold their second annual “Strides for Shauna” benefit show and date auction.

Casey Cohea, who is helping organize the benefit, said eight people have already committed to being “auctioned off” for dates, and she expects others to join the list by the time the event starts Saturday night, Oct. 16.

The event will also feature a performance by Nikki McKibben who was the third place finisher in the debut season of American Idol.

McKibben isn’t one the dates who will be auctioned, Cohea noted, “she will just be there to sing. We told her what we were doing, and she wanted to help.”

The show and auction starts at 8:30 p.m. Saturday night at Best Friends Club, 2620 E. Lancaster Ave. in Fort Worth. And anyone interested in volunteering for the auction can contact Cohea at pinkertc15@yahoo.com or Albertson at Kinita.albertson@gmail.com.

But even those who can’t attend can still contribute by going online to OutOfTheDar-kness.com and donating to Team Strides for Shauna.

“I didn’t know Shauna. I’m doing this because people that I know and love knew and loved Shauna and this is important to them,” Cohea said.

“But I am also doing it because this is something that affects so many people in our community. We are losing so many people to suicide, and we have to do something to help.”

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition October 15, 2010.

—  Kevin Thomas

I ride because ‘You’re only as old as you feel’

Tammye Nash – Team Dallas Voice

Tammye Nash
Tammye Nash

Last year in October, I turned 49. It wasn’t any big deal, really, and at first, I didn’t think much about it. It was another birthday; considering the alternative, I was glad to be turning 49.

And then a few days later, it hit me: Reaching my 49th birthday meant that I would be 50 in a year. A year! That’s not very long at all in this my-how-time-flies world we live in.

And I was surprised to realize that the idea bothered me. I have never been distressed by any of those so-called milestone birthdays that can send others into a tizzy of depression. But the idea of turning 50 — it was really getting under my skin.

Oh, not because of the number, the Big 5-0. That, after all, is just a number. One more than 49; one less than 51. So what? It wasn’t being “50,” that bothered me; it was the idea of being “old.”

I have always believed that old cliché about age just being a state of mind (“If you don’t mind, it don’t matter”). The problem was, I was afraid that I was going to “feel old” when I turned 50. And I don’t want to feel old. Ever.

But what to do to avoid that? I pondered for a bit and then it hit me: Lone Star Ride Fighting AIDS.

See, last year in September, I volunteered as an event photographer for the ninth annual Lone Star Ride. Other folks were out there pedaling across North Texas, but my co-worker and co-volunteer photographer, Terry, and I had the hard job. We had to spend two days driving around North Texas in a convertible sports car, taking photos of the cyclists.

And I loved it — every minute of it. Even though I had covered Lone Star Rides in the past for Dallas Voice, last year was the first time I had participated. And I was amazed and awed by the spirit of the people, those who worked to organize the ride and those who rode and those who volunteered as crew.

All those people, strung out across the Metroplex on bicycles and in support vehicles, were all working together for a common goal — the goal of helping someone else. It was such a soul-shaking feeling to know that I was part of that, that I was in my own small way helping to make life better for people with HIV.

I knew without a doubt that I wanted to be a part of Lone Star Ride again in 2010, and Terry and I had already talked about volunteering again as photographers.

But a month later, as I contemplated reaching that half-century mark, I changed my mind. I decided I wasn’t going to volunteer. Instead, I was going to register as a rider.

That way, when mid-October rolled around and I turned 50, I could look back and say with confidence, “Hell no! I am not old! Look what I just did; I just rode my bike for, lo, these many miles to raise money and help someone else. Could an old person have done that?!”

There were other reasons, too, of course. I wanted to participate this year for the same reasons I volunteered last year. I want to help people living with HIV/AIDS today in memory of and in honor of the many friends I have already lost to the epidemic.

I am participating in Lone Star Ride for Dennis Vercher, who I worked with for more than 15 years, and for all the other Dallas Voice staffers we have lost through the years; I do it for people like Bill Hunt and John Thomas, who showed me by example what true activism looks like; I do it for Jessie Waggoner, my “little brother” who made me laugh with his crazy-legged “Fred Flintstone” dance. I do it for all the others, the list of names far too long to fit here in this space.

Yes, I know I could have honored my friends this year the same way I did last year, by volunteering for the crew. I know that without the crew, there would be no Lone Star Ride. And it’s possible that next year, I will set aside the bike and once again be a crew volunteer.

But this year is different. This year, I’m riding. I’m riding to prove — mainly to myself — that I can do it. I’m riding to prove I am not old, no matter what that calendar says. I’m riding to remember. I’m riding because others can’t.

Come join me if you can. And I won’t even ask how old you are.

Tammye Nash is a member of Team Dallas Voice. Donate to her or to another Lone Star Ride Fighting AIDS participant at LoneStarRide.org.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition August 6, 2010.

—  Michael Stephens