Snap shots: ‘Bill Cunningham New York’ turns the camera on fashion’s most influential paparazzo

LENS ME A SHOE | The Times photographer documents foot fashion in ‘Bill Cunningham New York.’

ARNOLD WAYNE JONES  | Life+Style Editor
jones@dallasvoice.com

Maybe Project Runway’s to blame, maybe The Devil Wears Prada, but for the past few years there has been a surplus of documentaries about the fashion industry, with profiles of designers like Valentino (Valentino: The Last Emperor), Yves Saint-Laurent (several in fact), even young designers (Seamless) and Vogue magazine’s editor (The September Issue). (By contrast, I can only recall one fashion doc from the 1990s: Unzipped, about a young designer named Isaac Mizrahi.) Is there really that much to say about dressmaking?

Maybe not, but while Bill Cunningham New York fits broadly within the category of fashion documentaries, its subject is unusual because he eschews the trappings of haute couture even as he’s inextricably a part of it — a huge part, really.

If you don’t read the New York Times, you might not recognize Cunningham’s name, and even if you do read it, it may not have registered with you. For about, well, maybe 1,000 years, Cunningham has chronicled New York society with his candid photos of the glitterati on the Evening Hours page. At the same time, however, he has documented real fashion — how New Yorkers dress in their daily lives — with his page On the Street, where he teases out trends (from hats to men in skirts to hip-hoppers allowing their jeans to dangle around their knees). Anna Wintour may tell us what we should wear; Cunningham shows us what we do.

“We all get dressed for Bill,” Wintour observes.

What makes Cunningham such an interesting character is how impervious he seems to the responsibility he effortlessly wields. He loves fashion, yes, but he’s not a slave to it himself. He scurries around Manhattan (even in his 80s) on his bicycle (he’s had dozens; they are frequently stolen), sometimes in a nondescript tux but mostly in jeans, a ratty blue smock and duck shoes, looking more like a homeless shoeshiner than the arbiter of great fashion. He flits through the city like a pixie with his 35mm camera (film-loaded, not digital), a vacant, toothy smile peaking out behind the lens, snapping the denizens of Babylon whether they want it or not.

One of the funniest moments is when strangers shoo him away as some lunatic paparazzo, unaware how all the well-heeled doyens on the Upper East would trade a nut to have Cunningham photograph them for inclusion in the Times. Patrick McDonald, the weirdly superficial modern dandy (he competed as a wannabe designer on the flop reality series Launch My Line a few seasons back), seems to exist with the hope that Cunningham will shoot him. And shoot him he does.

Many artists are idiosyncratic, even eccentric, but Cunningham is supremely odd by any standards. He lives in a tiny studio near Carnegie Hall filled with filing cabinets cluttered with decades of film negatives on the same floor as a crazy old woman, a kind of urban variation on Grey Gardens. He knows tons of people but most of them seem to know very little about him. By the time near the end when the filmmaker, director Richard Press, finally comes out and ask him outright whether he’s gay, Cunningham arches in that prickly New England way, never really answering outright, though he says he’s never — never — had a romantic relationship. Things like that were simply not discussed by men of his generation.

In some ways, we never really know any more about Cunningham at the end than any of his friends do, and perhaps even him. Cunningham comes across as defiantly non-self-reflective. He lets his work do all the talking for him. And that work has a lot to say on its own.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition April 8, 2011.

—  John Wright

Heavenbent for leather

Leather Knights bring back Angel Tree to benefit AIDS Services of Dallas

ANGELS IN AMERICA  |  David Henry  is making his list and checking it twice. (Arnold Wayne Jones/Dallas Voice)

Santa Claus isn’t always a fat old man in a fur suit. Sometimes he’s a hot leather daddy in a harness.

That’s the way the Leather Knights see it, at least. Once again, the group is sponsoring its Angel Tree for the holidays.

The idea is simple: Go to the Dallas Eagle and check out the tree, decorated with paper ornaments on which are written requests for some holiday cheer for clients of AIDS Services of Dallas and Hillcrest House. Some are middle-aged men in need of warm clothes. Some are children wanting their first iPod. All are deserving.

Take down the ornament, buy the gift, wrap it (with a tag) and return it to the Eagle no later than Dec. 18. The Knights and Eagle staff do the rest, delivering the gift to the person requesting it and making an angel out of you. And let’s face it: Most of the year, you’re more of a devil, so this is a perfect time to get into the holiday spirit.

— Arnold Wayne Jones

Visit the Angel Tree and return the gift between Nov. 27 and Dec. 18 at the Dallas Eagle, 2515 Inwood Road, suite 107. LeatherKnights.org.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition November 26, 2010.

—  Michael Stephens

Drawing Dallas

Just in time for Halloween, fashionista Davidré Stefond gives us naughty thoughts

MARK STOKES  | Illustrator mark@markdrawsfunny.com

Hot, hot, hot!

Name and age: Davidré Stefond, 18

Occupation: Fashion marketing student

Spotted: Cedar Hill

The devil makes him do it: A French Gemini, Davidré Stefond walks to the beat of his own distinctive drum. Ever the trendsetter, Davidré has his own unique sense of style, and was known in school as “the kid who could dress.” Active in his business college, this trendsetter plays forward for his school’s soccer team, is an avid volleyball player, and practices Tae kwon do. His love of acting has inspired him to pursue a career as a professional actor, and he hopes to play difficult dramatic roles.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition October 29, 2010

—  Kevin Thomas

‘Lucifer Descending’ at Stone Cottage Theater tonight

The devil never sleeps
Mark-Brian Sonna takes us to Hell again with his latest production, Lucifer Descending. Lucifer is pissed at God so he goes and creates the underworld. Then he sets his sights on abducting Seth, one of the sons of Adam and Eve. Clearly, Lucifer just doesn’t know when to stop.

DEETS: Stone Cottage Theater, 15650 Addison Rd., Through Nov. 6. $18–$25. MBSProductions.net.

—  Rich Lopez