If he could turn back time…

… Dallas drag legend Wayne Smith wouldn’t change a thing. After all the stops and starts, he leaves leaves town reflecting on a career of laughter, music … and a nip slip

STEVEN LINDSEY  |  stevencraiglindsey@me.com

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DO YOU BELIEVE IN LIFE AFTER WAYNE? | You’ll have to — next week the Cher impersonator and his handsome husbear head to life in the Midwest. (Gregory Hayes/Dallas Voice)

WAYNE SMITH FAREWELL
The Round-Up Saloon,
3912 Cedar Springs Road.
Jan. 11 at 8 p.m.  Free.
Hungdinger, 4000 Cedar Springs Road. Jan. 12 at 8:30 p.m.

…………………………

For nearly 20 years, Cher has performed almost nightly along the Cedar Springs strip.

“What’s this?” you say. But oh, yes. With a voice and appearance so convincing, patrons react to her as if she’s the real superstar, not Dallas native Wayne Smith performing what has become his signature role.

Known for being friendly and outgoing to everyone who crosses his path, it’s Smith’s singing prowess that has sets him apart from the many drag performers who lip-synch. He’s a true impersonator and a remarkable performer who has helped define Dallas’ gay scene for the past two decades.

But not so much the future of it. Smith will be missed by thousands as he packs up his bags next week to move with his husband Ben Wilson to Columbus, Ohio. It only takes a quick glance at his Facebook page to see how many lives he’s touched here.

In true Cher fashion, Smith isn’t going gently into his Texas retirement. He’ll give multiple farewell performances, with the final curtains this week at the Round-Up Saloon, Hungdinger and the Drama Room.

But performing isn’t the only major event of the week. Tomorrow, he and Wilson celebrate their third wedding anniversary (they were legally married in Stowe, Vt.); a few days after he turns 50.

“I don’t mind. AA-Freakin’-RP!” he jokes about his age. “It’s wonderful to be this old because I’ve done so much with my life. I had a hit children’s books; I sold 67,000 toys at Neiman Marcus, I had a fashion show at the Beverly Hills Hotel, I had my own salon one street over from Rodeo Drive and so much I can’t even remember. I was even a question on Hollywood Squares!”

Smith left Dallas after high school because he thought Los Angeles would be a better place to live as a gay man.

“I went out there to be the next Bob Mackie. Instead, I ended up working for him, which was great because I got to shop with Cher and hang out with people like Marie Osmond, Betty White and Carol Burnett, which was really incredible.”
One fateful Halloween, Mackie talked him into dressing up as Marilyn Monroe; he won a costume contest with his outfit. From such humble beginnings came the drag legend.

“Somebody approached me from La Cage, the original club in Los Angeles that started the show in Vegas. They were starting a new show at the Fontainebleau Hilton in Florida and they needed a Marilyn.” He also had to come up with a second character; a friend convinced him to do Dolly Parton. But one little nip slip changed his attitude forever.

“It was a total disaster,” he laughs. “I think I was the first person to have a wardrobe malfunction. I was doing Marilyn in the pink dress from ‘Diamonds Are a Girl’s Best Friend’ and every time I raised my arms, my nipples showed. The producer was watching me with his hands over his eyes and I thought, ‘Oh this is great.’ I’d already done Marilyn in a couple of gay bars and I knew I was the best ever. I was a diva, girl. That is really the day when I learned humility.”

Convinced he’d blown his chances, he was persuaded to give it another shot — with a twist.

“I turned it into a comedy act,” he says. “We had big neon poles around the stage and I pretended that my boobs got stuck and I had to pull one around the other side. Everyone was walking in, the performers and the staff, and they were all standing there laughing.”

He was hired on the spot and for a year, he performed in the famed La Ronde Showroom, a stage once graced by Judy Garland and Frank Sinatra. When the Florida show closed, Smith was invited to join the cast in Hollywood — and finally got to play Marilyn.

“In Hollywood, if you’re Marilyn, you’re the star of the show. She’s on everything. She’s on toilet paper!” he laughs. “It was the best thing that could have ever happened because I really learned to perfect character makeup. I did Norma Desmond, Marilyn, Dolly — I even got to do Lucille Ball because she personally asked me to impersonate her when she was at a birthday party for Milton Berle at the club. If the room had blown up that night, we would’ve lost so much Hollywood royalty. The room was just packed full of people. It really was amazing.”

Ball never got to see his impersonation of her because shortly after her request, she passed away. To this day, he has a picture of the star from a scene in Mame, which she autographed, “To Wayne, Love Lucy.” It’s one of his most treasured pieces of career memorabilia. “I broke up with a boyfriend while I was performing in Aruba and had a friend break into my apartment in Los Angeles to make sure he got that picture back. And he did!”

In 1989 — shortly after If I Could Turn Back Time was released — Smith ventured into performing as Cher. After a year abroad where he performed Marilyn, Dolly and Cher, he landed back in Dallas and has been performing here ever since: First at Moby Dick, then at Woody’s, Mickey’s, and his latest home, the restaurant/cabaret Hungdinger. For much of his time in Dallas, Smith performed as Cher five to six nights per week up and down the Strip.

“I’ve had an incredible, incredible career here in Dallas. I really have never wanted for work. I’m giving up five nights a week to go to ‘what if’ in Ohio,” he says.

He may not know what lies ahead, but he’s sure of his mark on the world.

“I used to feel like I haven’t done anything with my life. But my dad actually taught me a long time ago that I had. He asked me how many people I’d performed for over the years,” Smith recalls. Between all the shows at La Cage and on TV, they estimated that he’d entertained millions of people. “My dad asked me, ‘Did you make those people forget their problems for a little bit and laugh? How many people can say that?’”

It dawned on him that what he does is much more than just sing a bit in clubs.

“Yeah, some people say I’m an attention whore, or just a drag queen, or just a female impersonator, but you know what? I’ve had people come up to me who are sick or had somebody die in their family to thank me for helping them forget their problems, even if just for a little while. I’m a court jester. I just wear different outfits,” he says.

But though he’s leaving town, this is definitely not the end of Smith — wherever he may end up.

“I’m not Cher, I’ve never claimed to be. But if I can mimic it enough that people still like it, I’ll keep doing it if I’m in a wheelchair gummin’ it to I Got You Babe.”

And that’s something plenty of people would gladly pay to see.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition January 7, 2011.

—  Kevin Thomas

New gay reality show to be filmed in Oak Lawn

Cedar Springs RoadDallas is THE hot spot for fall television this year. Look for “Chase” on NBC and “The Good Guys” and “Lonestar” on Fox.

How much more of Dallas will America get to see? That depends on whether the pilot of a new reality show that will be filmed on the Strip gets picked up.

“Promoting Dallas: A Reality Show” is produced by Dallas promoter Roy Murray and will film in Oak Lawn on Aug. 27 and 28.

The producers wrote:

When it comes to promoting night life in the fourth largest metropolitan area in America, one can expect copious amounts of entertaining events, starlight-filled drama and beverage enhanced truths.

Roy Murray, event promoter of  Dallas, feels that it is time America had the chance to see the never-ending list of things to do to ensure an electrifying night out on the town, all while building a brand. Murray and his street-team of dedicated guys and girls have been promoters in the Dallas/Fort Worth area for the past 10 years. Roy was on of the founding members of 7connection before starting Black Knight Production. He was also the chairman of Dallas Southern Pride.

All these aspects give the show an edgy inquiry, but the quality attribute of the show is its niche market, all the taping and action  will all take place within the Dallas LGBT Community, ensuring a diverse look into what it takes to promote and entertain the most financially friendly demographic in Dallas.

“Dallas is known for its social scene but our community is literally the scene to be seen!” stated Murray.

Here’s the filming schedule for “Promoting Dallas.”

Friday Aug. 27:

The Drama Room, 3851 Cedar Springs Rd., 6 p.m.-10 p.m. for Happy Hour

The Brick, 2525 Wycliff Ave., 10 p.m.-3 a.m.

Saturday, Aug. 28:

Hungdinger’s for the Stoplight Party Ladies Edition, 3851 Cedar Springs Rd., 10:30 p.m.-2 a.m.

Club Rush, 3903 Lemmon Ave., 10 p.m.-2 a.m.

—  David Taffet

Hershner overdosed on alcohol, cocaine

Marty Hershner

Marty Hershner, the owner of the Tin Room and the Drama Room who passed away in April, died from an overdose of alcohol and cocaine, according to the Dallas County Medical Examiner’s Office.

Dr. Chester Gwin of the ME’s Office said Thursday morning he wasn’t at liberty to discuss toxicology results in detail. But Gwin confirmed that the official cause of death was “cocaine and ethanol toxicity.”

“The amount in the system doesn’t really matter,” Gwin said. “It’s one of those drugs where a little can do the same as a lot. … Cocaine is toxic in and of itself, but when you combine alcohol to it, there’s a metabolite that’s formed between the interaction of ethanol and cocaine that’s an irritant to the heart.”

Following Hershner’s death, Dallas police said they believed an overdose was possible because “a lot of drugs” were found at the scene.

To read our full story about Hershner’s death, go here.

—  John Wright

3 paintings stolen from Drama Room

One of the stolen paintings by Rob Conover
One of the stolen paintings by Rob Conover.

Artist Robb Conover reports that three of his paintings that had been hanging inside the Drama Room on Cedar Springs were stolen. It happened during business hours on Wednesday night.

“Two of the suspects were a small lesbian woman and her tall Asian male with long black hair,” Conover said. “Everyone in the area knows them. A reward is being offered to anyone with knowledge of the paintings’ whereabouts and the persons involved.”

Conover wrote on his Facebook page: “They set up a decoy. So sad. They knew what they were doing. It happened fast.”

Conover asked anyone with information to contact Conover at 214-623-7790 or the Drama Room at 214-443-6020.

—  David Taffet

Services for Marty Hershner are Saturday

For those who’ve been patiently waiting and checking back here for updates on Marty Hershner’s death, my story is up over on the main page. Read it by going here. Here’s the info about services:

Lonzie Hershner said a viewing will be held from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Friday, April 30 at Ben F.Brown’s Memorial Funeral Home, 707 N. MacArthur Blvd. in Irving.

A funeral will be at 2:30 p.m. Saturday at the same location.

Both the viewing and the funeral are open to the public.

Lonzie Hershner said family and friends also plan a memorial show at the Drama Room in the next few weeks. He said he would provide details next week.

—  John Wright

Tin Room owner says rumors that bar was raided last night are false

Marty Hershner, owner of the Tin Room, says rumors that the gay bar on Hudnall Street in Oak Lawn was raided last night are false.

Someone sent a text message to a member of the Dallas Voice editorial staff this morning saying the bar had been raided. Hershner said someone also posted the rumor on their Facebook page, and he got a call from his brother early this morning inquiring about the alleged incident.

“No such thing happened,” Hershner told me. “When you do well, you have lots of haters, and I guess that’s what it is. We were packed last night, and had a great night. It was St. Patrick’s Day.

“That is completely not true,” he added. “They’re just trying to stir up shit. It makes me angry. There were police down the street, but that was dealing with a homeless person, two cops and a homeless guy. That wasn’t even on my property.”

We also put a call in to Dallas police this morning. Sr. Cpl. Kevin Janse said he would check with the vice unit, but we haven’t heard back from him yet.

In related news, Hershner said his new bar on Cedar Springs, the Drama Room, is set to open next week at the site of the old Mickey’s. A VIP night is set for Wednesday, followed by a grand opening on Thursday.

“It’s coming along well,” Hershner said. “I added a dance floor and I just changed all the décor. It was kind of nice before, it was just beat up. I made it much nicer. I’ll put a nice patio out back, and there’s going to be entertainers.”

—  John Wright