Gay blogs reveal Clay Aiken has a new beau right here in Dallas

Celebgalz.com

What is it with pop stars and Dallas men? George Michael started the trend with his tolerant beau Ken Goss, Then we find out that Lance Bass is dating someone originally from Dallas. Over the past few days, the gay gossip blogs have been buzzing about local actor Jeff Walters and his celeb boyfriend Clay Aiken. After we found that out, his appearance in the audience at Theatre 3′s Drowsy Chaperone all started to make sense.

Perez Hilton posted this clip about the two’s appearances in town, which included stops at Pinkberry, Gaylord Texan and Borders. Aiken also took in Ohlook’s production of The Rocky Horror Show where Walters played the title character. And then it came out that Walter is an underwear model. Hot. Then it came out Walters had sexy pics on Grindr. Extra hot.

Colleague Chance sent me this TwitPic of Aiken at Theatre 3. Initially we thought “that’s random.” Come to find out, Aiken was doing so much more here.

Oh, and Aiken’s tour stops in Grand Prairie at Verizon Theatre on March 8. In case you were more interested in his music than his love life.

—  Rich Lopez

Theatre 3 extends ‘Drowsy Chaperone’

The Drowsy Chaperone was always set to be on hiatus from Dec. 20 through 29, with two more weeks tacked on after that. But the success of the show — which we reviewed here — has led the company to extend it a week. It will now run through Jan. 15, the same weekend I Love You, You’re Perfect, Now Change opens in Theatre Too.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Christmas presence

Satiric ‘Drowsy Chaperone’ succeeds with intimate setting; DTC freshens up its annual ‘Christmas Carol;’ and who’s being a Scrooge about ‘Santaland Diaries?’ We are

ON THE BOARDS
A CHRISTMAS CAROL
at the Kalita Humphreys Theater,
3636 Turtle Creek Blvd. Through Dec. 24.
DallasTheaterCenter.org.

THE DROWSY CHAPERONE
at Theatre Three, 2900 Routh St. in the Quadrangle. Through Jan. 9.
Theatre3Dallas.com

THE SANTALAND DIARIES
at Greenville Center for the Arts,
5601 Sears St. Through Dec. 23.
ContemporaryTheatreofDallas.com

stage-2
MUSICAL OF MUSICALS | TV talk show host Rob McCollum, left, makes a hilarious narrator in Theatre Three’s intimate, well-paced production of ‘The Drowsy Chaperone.’

Chaperone: Rousing drowsy

There are some shows that seem nearly impossible to translate to the challenges of theater-in-the-round, but Theatre Three’s extravagantly staged production of The Drowsy Chaperone not only succeeds, but perhaps becomes better.  Now, much like the show’s narrator, the audience becomes surrounded and engulfed by the action.

The show’s conceit is that a brittle theater geek (Good Morning Texas’ hilarious Rob McCollum) is alone in his apartment, waxing nostalgic about his favorite musical of all time, The Drowsy Chaperone. He pulls out an LP (“yes records” he snaps), puts it on the turntable and as the cast recording plays, the musical comes to life in his living room.

Part loving homage, part brilliant satire, the musical that unfolds is a classically constructed Broadway hit about a woman leaving her glamorous career in showbiz to marry a man she met on a cruise ship. Is it true love or is she just interested in his father’s oil holdings? To keep the bride-to-be from seeing the groom prior to the wedding, she is assigned a chaperone, who’s constantly drunk (“drowsy,” as she calls it) despite it being the height of Prohibition. As the wedding day approaches, plenty of obstacles are thrown in the path of the happy couple, building to a rousing climax.

There are plenty of colorful characters, including an aviatrix (which we’re told is code for “lesbian”), a womanizing Latin lover, rat-a-tat gangsters, ditzy socialites and an even ditzier chorus girl. All the machinations and musical theater clichés are present and accounted for, from tap-dancing showdowns to jazz hands and high-kicking chorus lines, all combined with self-referential jokes that frequently break down the fourth wall.

Theatre Three’s casting and production is spot-on, including McCollum, the always enchanting Arianna Movassagh as the moll Kitty and a tipsy turn from Marisa Diotalevi as the title character. The Drowsy Chaperone, in all its laugh-out-loud extravagance, is a wonderful alternative to the holiday fare on other stages around town, and every bit as merry and bright.

— Steven Lindsey

stage-1
BAH, CRUMPET | Nye Cooper returns to the island of misfit toy-sellers in the bitter comedy ‘The Santaland Diaries.’

Santaland: Angels we have heard on Nye

By the sounds of it, I may be one of the few left in these parts that had not seen The Santaland Diaries, the stage adaptation of David Sedaris’ droll essay about debasing himself for part-time work at Macy’s. Over the years, the local production has become a holiday tradition with Nye Cooper donning the elf cap. He channels Sedaris with the appropriate wit, but as a first timer at the one-man show at the Contemporary Theatre of Dallas, it seems that the show, while fun, needs some oomph.

The play recounts Sedaris’ travails working as Crumpet, an elf in New York’s famous Santaland display over one Christmas season. Bratty children and even brattier parents are all stars in Sedaris’ story and Cooper succeeds in stepping into that skin. He should: He’d done it more than half a dozen times. With such familiarity, he embodies disgruntlement to the nines, but also a certain amount of heart to take the audience from disdainful diatribes to a tender epiphany.

Despite the show’s institutional standing, it plays just shy of greatness. Cooper can deliver a punchline, but you can also tell it’s been delivered before… and before that. Diaries is ideal for the driest of humor, but he held back a bit here and delivered Crumpet as just kind of a friendly sass.

Nonetheless, Sedaris’ clever writing mixed with Cooper’s rubber face and sad eyes is a match made in heaven. And the payoff isn’t the sweet realization he comes to. It’s Crumpet saying all those things to holiday shoppers you wish you could say yourself. Hearing those alone makes it a worthwhile see.

— Rich Lopez

HUM BUGGERY | The Ghost of Christmas Past (Cedric Neal) visits old Ebenezer (Chamblee Ferguson) in DTC’s slightly retooled version of ‘A Christmas Carol.” (Photo courtesy Linda Blase)

A Christmas Carol: A turn of the Scrooge

After five years of listening to other actors humbug their way into audiences’ hearts as Scrooge, the Dallas Theater Center has moved its perennial Bob Cratchit, Chamblee Ferguson, into the lead role in their annual A Christmas Carol, and the move ends up being one long overdue.

Ferguson is tall and slender, and in his tight-fitting black suit, Ichabod-like. That’s a very different tale from the same era (and across an ocean), but it draws together an odd thematic unity to the idea of the ghost story: Real or imagined, sometimes you need to look at the world anew.

Which is pretty much what this production’s new director, Mathew Gray, has done within the limitations of the same script and set that has been trotted out ever since they tore down the Art District Theater to build the Winspear and the Wyly. The show is solid, and it has succeeded (more or less) over the past few years with some tweaking here and there, but this may be the biggest overhaul yet: New Marley (Liz Mikel, looking like the scary spirit of Harriet Tubman), new Christmas Past (Cedric Neal, his skin seeming almost iridescent), new Christmas Present (J. Brent Alford in an unfortunate hippie-dippie robe that makes him look like Jesus and his amazing Technicolor dreamcoat, chillin’ on a commune circa 1968), and the most adorable kids — Little Ebenezer/Tiny Tim (on press night, played by a girl, Marlhy Murphy) and Edward Cratchit (Aidan Langford) — in memory.

But it’s Ferguson and Regan Adair (stepping in as Cratchit) whose performances really transforms the show. There’s great chemistry here: Ferguson, a lanky and sharp Mutt opposite Adair’s sad-sack, flustered Jeff. There’s more of a comic sensibility between them, with Adair spinning a modern twist on the familiar victim of Scrooge’s discourtesy. The Cratchits’ dinner scene is as tender as it’s ever been.

If the comedy is played up well, so is the schmaltz (it’s easy to tear up by the end), but Gray also imbues the ghost visits with a Twilight Zone quality. There really is a sense for the bizarre and the supernatural now.

And also a sense for the message. During a rough economy, Dickens’ social engineering — looking after the poor, the greed of the privileged, etc. — take on heightened meaning. It redirects the emphasis of A Christmas Carol from personal growth to a call for systemic compassion for those in need. It’s good to be reminded of that in an effective way that also entertains.

— Arnold Wayne Jones

Note: As it has for the past two years, the Dallas Theater Center will be raising money for the North Texas Food Bank to help feed the underprivileged living in North Texas. Donations can be made at every performance.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition December 10, 2010.

—  Michael Stephens

’Tis the season

Christmastime gears up stage traditions

PANTO-MOM | Ivan Jones, right, plays Governess Amplebottom in ‘Babes in the Wood,’ a fairy tale take on Robin Hood that’s suitable for kids but full of double entendres. (Photo by Mark Trew)

With Thanksgiving now behind us, theater companies are pullout out their Christmas fare — many with more-than-holiday appeal to the gay community. Check out these shows that might jingle your bells.

A Christmas Carol (Dallas Theater Center). The classic production returns to Oak Lawn, with a few tweaks. Back in the cast are local actors Chamblee Ferguson and Liz Mikel … only this time in new roles. Ferguson has matured from Cratchit to his boss, playing Scrooge, and Mikel returns, now in the role of the ghost of Jacob Marley. Kalita Humphreys Theater, 3636 Turtle Creek Blvd. Opens Dec. 3, runs daily (except Mondays) through Dec. 24. DallasTheaterCenter.org.

The Santaland Diaries (Contemporary Theatre of Dallas). Another tradition is back, as actor Nye Cooper and director Coy Covington add some holiday jeer with David Sedaris’ hilarious antidote to Christmas treacle, about a gay elf toiling away at Macy’s during the holiday. Ho-ho-homo! Greenville Center for the Arts, 5601 Sears St. Opens Dec. 3; runs weekends through Dec. 23. ContemporaryTheatreofDallas.com.

Babes in the Wood (Theatre Britain). Dallas’ resident Anglophile troupe has a new venue and a new show, its annual world premiere panto. A tradition in England for 200 years, this fairy tale always features a cross-dressing comic dame (played this year by Ivan Jones) who tells lots of lascivious jokes that go over the kids’ heads but keep the adults laughing. Cox Building Playhouse, 1517 Avenue H, Plano. Opens Dec. 3, runs weekends through Dec. 23. Theatre-Britain.com.

The Drowsy Chaperone (Theatre Three). It’s not a Christmas show, but this buoyant musical — about a forgotten but goofily charming Depression Era musical that comes to life in a gay man’s apartment — is loaded with good cheer and a smartness about the conventions of the form. Theatre Three, 2900 Routh St. in the Quadrangle. Currently in previews; opens Dec. 6, runs through Jan. 8 (no performances Christmas week). Theatre3Dallas.com.

— Arnold Wayne Jones

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition December 3, 2010.

—  Michael Stephens

Applause • That’s so gay

Queer connections infiltrate lots of the upcoming season of arts

Tony Award-winning gay baritone Paulo Szot
Tony Award-winning gay baritone Paulo Szot, above, is a coup for the Dallas Opera; Pink Martini, below, gets the Meyerson jumping as the Dallas Symphony Orchestra’s guest next week.

When you have a gay theater company (as Dallas does in Uptown Players) and another troupe dedicated to bringing Broadway musicals to town (as Dallas Summer Musicals does), you can be pretty confident in finding gay appeal in the lively arts.

But cast your gaze — and your gays — outside the usual focus, and there a lot more to discover across the arts in North Texas this season.

Chief among the highlights: The Dallas Opera’s coup in snagging dreamy gay baritone Paulo Szot, who won a much-deserved Tony for the revival of South Pacific, in the title role in Mozart’s Don Giovanni (Oct. 22). Director Stephen Lawless returns to helm Anna Bolena (Oct. 29). DallasOpera.org.

Of course, Uptown Players and DSM are getting into the action with their upcoming shows as well. UP’s final production of their 2010 season is the American premiere of Closer to Heaven, written to the songs of the Pet Shop Boys. The musical drama opens Oct. 1 at the Kalita Humphreys Theater. The group will announce its 2011 season on Tuesday. UptownPlayers.org. And DSM’s national tour of Shrek is the State Fair Musical this year, opening Sept. 28. DallasSummerMusicals.org.

Next week, Theatre Three produces the local premiere of Songs from an Unmade Bed, a song cycle about a gay man working his way through a relationship. In previews from Sept. 3 in the Theatre Too space. Also in Theatre Too: Bruce R. Coleman’s latest play, the puppet show Tales from Mount Olympus, and spring welcomes Why Torture Is Wrong, and the People Who Love Them by Christopher Durang. Next up on the main stage is Laramie Project creator Moises Kaufman’s 33 Variations, followed in December by the local premiere of The Drowsy Chaperone. Theatre3Dallas.com.

Contemporary Theatre of Dallas continues its presentation of Ed Graczyk’s world premiere Texas-set comedy-drama with a gay twist, Blue Moon Dancing, which runs through Sept. 12. Its 2010–11 season kicks off in October, and includes plays directed by Rene Moreno (The Trip to Bountiful) and Michael Serrecchia (Cheaters), plus a play by gay playwright Alan Ball (Five Women Wearing the Same Dress). ContemporaryTheatreofDallas.com.

The Dallas Theater Center launches its new season next month with the company’s gay artistic director Kevin Moriarty’s adaptation of Henry IV (opens Sept. 11).  The season ends with the musicals Cabaret and The Wiz. DallasTheaterCenter.org.

WaterTower Theatre begins its season with its artistic director, Terry Martin, directing and starring in Our Town (previewing on Sept. 24), and closes the season with Howard Ashman’s camptastic Little Shop of Horrors in July. WaterTowerTheatre.org.

Pink Martini
Pink Martini

Bass Hall brings in Spring Awakening on Nov. 9–10, followed by Mamma Mia, A Chorus Line, Beauty and the Beast and 9 to 5 later in the season. BassHall.org. In Dallas, the Lexus Broadway Series includes Young Frankenstein (Jan. 4) and Billy Elliot (June 8), while TITAS starts with MOMIX (Sept. 10) and the return of Complexions Contemporary Ballet (May 11). ATTPAC.org. The Dallas Black Dance Theatre stages a dance by local legend Bruce Wood in the spring as well (see story Page S6).

It’s not just opera and theater that goes gay, either: The Dallas Symphony Orchestra welcomes queer-led bank Pink Martini on Sept. 3, and The Music of Michael Jackson starts Sept. 1. DallasSymphony.org.

Arnold Wayne Jones

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition August 27, 2010

—  Kevin Thomas

Gays on strike!

No ‘Regrets’ for Rudnick farce

ARNOLD WAYNE JONES | Life+Style Editor jones@dallasvoice.com

WEDDED BLISS | A gay man (B.J. Cleveland) takes a stand against his flighty friend (Mary-Margaret Pyeatt) in Uptown’s sophisticated fizz. (Photo by Mike Morgan)

REGRETS ONLY
Kalita Humphreys Theater, 3636 Turtle Creek Blvd.
Through June 27.
UptownPlayers.org



The world inhabited by Hank Hadley and the McCullough family is one of cocktail parties, witty repartee and comforting superficiality. The first real issue anyone has had to deal with is the loss to cancer, after 28 years together, of Hank’s (B.J. Cleveland) partner. Even that sad news is softened when then McCullough’s daughter Spencer (Melissa Farmer) announces her engagement. She wants Hank, a famous fashion designer, to make her wedding dress.

But Hank is having second thoughts. Spencer and her father Jack (Dennis Canright), both lawyers, have agreed to draft a constitutional amendment defining marriage as between a man and a woman. Hank and Jack’s wife Tibby (Mary-Margaret Pyeatt) are apolitical, but this issue hits close to home. Maybe Hank — maybe all gay people — should go on strike.

In Regrets Only, Paul Rudnick turns a hot-button issue like gay marriage into the stuff of frothy fun, full of delicious zingers (“If you wanna kill sincerity, add crab cakes and God” one person observes of weddings) even while tackling serious matters. When’s the last time you heard a cogent discussion of gay marriage between opposite camps that didn’t become loud, angry and hectoring diatribes?

Because for me, it was last week at the Kalita Humphreys Theater.

Although there’s no music (other than director Coy Covington’s whimsical insertion of incidental tunes at the act breaks), in terms of its old-fashioned appeal with an updated outlook, it calls to mind the musical The Drowsy Chaperone: A fantasy with concrete ideas and sentimentality that completely avoids mawkishness.

Indeed, this is throwback entertainment in the best sense. Despite its contemporary issues, Regrets Only most resembles Dinner at Eight and other bubbly, smart, ’30s-era comedies: The perfectly appointed drawing room, the banter as sparkling as a magnum of champagne, the lovely costumes. This production has all that, especially an elegant and expensive looking set by Andy Redmon (nothing’s more disappointing that when a Park Avenue penthouse looks like a Park Slope coldwater flat; this one doesn’t).

The cast is flawless, with Cleveland uncharacteristically demure — he’s easily upstaged by Cynthia Matthews as a saucy maid (her riff on fashion is brilliant) and works effortlessly with Pyeatt on creating an authentic friendship.

Rudnick can be a bit too inside baseball, with obscure but hysterical theater jokes (David Mamet and Neil LaBute? Risky), but even potentially dour moments are buoyed like helium, and the second act farce is winningly executed.

Like the best cocktail, Covington has delivered delightful brew that goes to your head for 90 minutes and leaves you happy and refreshed. I’ll drink to that.

This article appeared in the National Pride edition in the Dallas Voice print edition June 18, 2010.

—  Dallasvoice