Theater critics forum bestows annual honors


Garret Storms, right, was recognized for the excellent production of ‘The Big Meal’ at WaterTower, as was director Emily Scott Banks.

The Dallas-Fort Worth Theater Critics Forum weighed in last weekend about the 2015-16 theater season. Some shows currently in production — including Constellations at DTC and The Toxic Avenger at Uptown Players — were recognized. Eligibility ran from Sept. 1, 2015–Aug. 31, 2016.


Akín Babatundé, Bootycandy, Stage West and The Mountaintop, Dallas Theater Center

Emily Scott Banks, The Big Meal, WaterTower Theatre

David Lozano, Blood Wedding, Cara Mía Theatre Company

Katherine Owens, Long Day’s Journey Into Night, Undermain Theatre

Artie Olaisen, The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane, Dallas Children’s Theater

Len Pfluger, Grand Hotel, Lyric Stage

CabaretProvidence Performing Arts Center

The tour of ‘Cabaret’ was one of the best this season.

Susan Sargeant, Play, WingSpan Theatre Company

Ryan Matthieu Smith, Trainspotting, L.I.P. Service

Garret Storms, The Nether, Stage West

Regina Washington, Harriet Jacobs, African American Repertory Theater


Clarkston by Samuel D. Hunter, Dallas Theater Center

Deferred Action by David Lozano and Lee Trull, Cara Mía Theatre Company and Dallas Theater Center

Faust by Michael Federico, Lydia Mackay and Jeffrey Schmidt, The Drama Club

Stacy Has a Thing for Black Guys by Ruben Carrazana, The Tribe

Temple Spirit by Susan Felder, Echo Theatre


Alan Cumming Sings Sappy Songs, AT&T Performing Arts Center Off-Broadway on Flora Series

Beautiful: The Carole King Musical, AT&T Performing Arts Center Broadway Series

Eric Bogosian’s Bitter Honey: The Best of 100 (Monologues), AT&T Performing Arts Center Off-Broadway on Flora Series

Cabaret, AT&T Performing Arts Center Broadway Series

A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder, AT&T Performing Arts Center Broadway Series

Ghost Quartet, AT&T Performing Arts Center Off-Broadway on Flora Series

The Sound of Music, Dallas Summer Musicals and Performing Arts Fort Worth


Lyric’s ‘Grand Hotel’ with Mary-Margaret Pyeatt and Christopher J. Deaton.


Christopher J. Deaton, Grand Hotel, Lyric Stage

Bruce DuBose, The Night Alive, Undermain Theatre

Hassan El-Amin, A Christmas Carol, Dallas Theater Center and The Mountaintop, Dallas Theater Center

Ivan Jasso, Deferred Action, Cara Mía Theatre Company and Dallas Theater Center

Jason Leyva, The Whale, L.I.P. Service

Barry Nash, I’m Gonna Pray for You So Hard, Kitchen Dog Theater

Alex Organ, Constellations, Dallas Theater Center

Brandon Potter, Richard III, Shakespeare Dallas and Shakespeare in the Bar

Garret Storms, The Big Meal, WaterTower Theatre

Terry Vandivort, The Fantasticks, Theatre Three


Karen Parrish in ‘Blackberry Winter’


Emily Scott Banks, Jacob Marley’s A Christmas Carol, Stage West

Jessica Cavanagh, Outside Mullingar, WaterTower Theatre

Amber Devlin, Picnic, Theatre Three

Frida Espinosa-Muller, Blood Wedding, Cara Mía Theatre Company and Deferred Action, Cara Mía Theatre Company and Dallas Theater Center

Tiana Johnson, The Mountaintop, Dallas Theater Center

Jenny Ledel, I’m Gonna Pray for You So Hard, Kitchen Dog Theater

Denise Lee, Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar and Grill, Jubilee Theatre


Janelle Lutz played Judy Garland in ‘The End of the Rainbow’

Janelle Lutz, The End of the Rainbow, Uptown Players and Miracle on 34th Street, Dallas Children’s Theater

Karen Parrish, Blackberry Winter, Kitchen Dog Theater

Allison Pistorius, Constellations, Dallas Theater Center

Joanna Schellenberg, Long Day’s Journey into Night, Undermain Theatre

Diane Worman, The Thrush and the Woodpecker, Kitchen Dog Theater


The Big Meal, WaterTower Theatre

Bootycandy, Stage West

Faust, The Drama Club

Grand Hotel, Lyric Stage

Long Day’s Journey into Night, Undermain Theatre

The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane, Dallas Children’s Theater

The Nether, Stage West

toxie1Play, WingSpan Theatre Company

The Toxic Avenger, Uptown Players

Under the Skin, Circle Theatre


Jeffrey Colangelo, fight choreography, Christina Valentine, fight assistant, and Bobby Garcia, martial arts consultant, Animal vs. Machine, PrismCo

Design team, Faust, The Drama Club

Design team, Jonah, Undermain Theatre

Jay Dias, musical direction and orchestration restoration, Anything Goes, Lyric Stage

John M. Flores, sound design, The Thrush and the Woodpecker, Kitchen Dog Theater

Richard Gwozdz, orchestra conducting, Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown, Artes de la Rosa

Kyle Igneczi, puppet design and direction, Hershel and the Hanukkah Goblins, Amphibian Stage Productions

Benjamin Lutz and Dillon White, video design, Trainspotting, L.I.P. Service

Lynn Mauldin and Rebekka Koepke, properties design, The Adventures of Flo and Greg, Echo Theatre

Scott Osborne, set design, The Fantasticks, Theatre Three

Karen Perry, costume design, Dreamgirls, Dallas Theater Center

Gil Pritchett, musical direction, Harriet Jacobs, African American Repertory Theater

Ryan Rumery, original music and sound design, Constellations, Dallas Theater Center

Garret Storms and Nate Davis, set design, The Nether, Stage West


Rose Pearson, co-founder of Circle Theatre, for a lifetime of visionary leadership of professional theater in Fort Worth and support of female theater artists.

Kurt Kleinmann, for his creation of Pegasus Theatre’s Living Black & White productions and 30 years as bumbling noir detective Harry Hunsacker.

Dallas Children’s Theater for providing sensory friendly performances for kids with special needs.


The forum is an organization of professional, paid critics that recognizes outstanding theatrical contributions in North Texas. Members must see 50 or more productions per season and are not actively practicing theater artists.

Nancy Churnin, Dallas Morning News

Martha Heimberg, and Dallas Weekly

Arnold Wayne Jones, Dallas Voice

Mark Lowry, and Fort Worth Star-Telegram

Punch Shaw, Fort Worth Star-Telegram

Lindsey Wilson, CultureMap


—  Arnold Wayne Jones

ATTPAC, DTC add open captioning for the hearing impaired

Hand making P signLast month, we ran a story about Don Jones, who for decades has been the American Sign Language interpreter for the Turtle Creek Chorale. We also mentioned how Theatre 3 was leading a push to sponsor real-time deaf interpretation during certain performances.

Now the AT&T Performing Arts Center and Dallas Theater Center are getting into the act as well. In conjunction with the Theatre Development Fund, ATTPAC and DTC will provide open captioning — similar to the supertitles at an opera, with all the dialogue, lyrics and sound effects projected on the side of the stage — at select performances of shows. The first was last Sunday at A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder, but the DTC will do it four more times this season: At the new musical Bella: An American Tall Tale (Oct. 6), at A Christmas Carol (Dec. 11), at The Christians (Feb. 12, 2017) and at the world premiere Hood (July 16). ATTPAC is expected to add more dates as shows come available.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

EXCLUSIVE: Uptown Players’ 16th season announced

Coy Covington BOWUptown Players, which opens the third mainstage production of its 15th season tonight, has lined up its 2017 slate of productions — as usual consisting of two plays, two musicals and a fundraiser show — but a few curveballs are headed this way as well.

First, the next season will begin at the Kalita Humphreys Theater this November (rather than in 2017), with their first-ever production of Angels in America, Part One: Millennium Approaches (Nov. 4–20). Tony Kushner’s Pulitzer- and Tony-winning reverie about the AIDS crisis is often considered one of the towering theatrical achievements of the 20th century. Cheryl Denson, who direct tonight’s show, It’s Only a Play, will helm it. Uptown Players co-founder Craig Lynch also assures me that the company plans on doing the follow-up, Angels in America, Part Two: Perestroika, the following season.

That will likely be followed in March 2017 by the latest incarnation of Broadway Our Way (March 3–5). The annual revue is a fundraiser for the company.

The next mainstage show will be It Shoulda Been You (March 24–April 9), a romantic musical that ran on Broadway in 2015. At a wedding, secrets are revealed, lesbian relationships unveiled, promises broken and more. The will be followed in the summer by the first-ever UP production of La Cage aux Folles (July 14–30), the flamboyantly joyous and colorful musical about a gay couple who own a drag club and their efforts to hide their business from their son’s conservative in-laws.

The final show of the season will be the regional premiere of Charles Busch’s comedy The Tribute Artist (Aug. 25–Sept. 10). Once again, Coy Covington, pictured, will take over the cross-dressing lead role as a female impersonator whose deception leads to chaotic hijinks.  (This production is slated for Bryant Hall on the Kalita campus, although it may move to the main building depending on the decisions made by the Dallas Theater Center, which retains right of first refusal over the space.)

Aside from the early start to the season, a few other specials emerge. First, Uptown’s Pride Performing Arts Festival will return (right after The Toxic Avenger), to coincide with Dallas Pride. Second,UP will once again team up with the Turtle Creek Chorale for a concert production of a musical — this time, Titanic (May 5–7). It will be performed at the City Performance Hall.

Finally, Lynch said there is “room on the calendar” for a Christmas show in December 2016 (following Angels), although one has not been selected yet.

Individual tickets are $25–$55, and season subscriptions are also available. Visit for more.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

BREAKING: DTC announces 2015-16 season lineup

rsDTC Artistic Director Kevin Moriarty_Photo by Tadd MyersThe Dallas Theater Center will offer up three world premieres, partner with Houston’s famed Alley Theatre and return to Shakespeare in their next season, Kevin Moriarty, the DTC’s artistic director, just announced.

The season will also take place almost entirely at the Wyly Theatre downtown; this season, every show has ping-ponged between the Wyly and Uptown’s Kalita Humphreys Theater. Only Romeo & Juliet, the company’s first stab at Shakespeare since King Lear several seasons ago, will be at the Kalita.

Also, for the first time since the Wyly opened, there will be no summer musical. After Sense & Sensibility closes in late May, the DTC will be dark until the Sept. 2 debut of Moonshine: That Hee Haw Musical, one of the world premieres announced by Moriarty. Based on the cornpone TV show, it will launch the 2015–16 season, running Sept. 2–Oct. 11 in the Potter Rose Hall at the Wyly.

Concurrently upstairs at the Wyly will be the area premiere of The Mountaintop, the Tony-nominated play about the last night of Martin Luther King Jr. It will run Sept. 11–Nov. 15 in the 99-seat Studio Theatre.

The season will then pick up with the traditional holiday show, A Christmas Carol. Brierley Resident Acting Company member Christina Vela will direct the adaptation by Moriarty, which the DTC has performed for the past two seasons. It will play Nov. 25–Dec. 26.

In a rare double bill during Dickens, the world premiere play Clarkston will run Dec. 3–Jan. 31 in the Studio Theatre. The play is about two men — a descendant of the explorer William Clark and a grad student in gender studies — who explore issues of faith and doubt in modern society. The author is MacArthur Foundation “Genius Grant” recipient Samuel Hunter.

In January 2016, the action moves to the Kalita for Romeo & Juliet, directed by Joel Ferrell. It runs Jan. 27–Feb. 28. Then it’s back to the Wyly for the area premiere of All the Way, the Tony Award winner from last Broadway season about LBJ. Moriarty will direct the show, which runs March 3–27.

Deferred Action, the final world premiere, will open from local playwrights David Lozano (Oedipus el Rey) and Lee Trull (A Christmas Carol). It deals with a Dreamer — a young immigrant taking advantage of the Dream Act (April 20–May 15). Finally, DTC returns to the summer musical format with a new presentation of Dreamgirls, the Tony-, Grammy- and Oscar-winning fictionalized telling of Motown and the rise of the Supremes (June 10–July 24).

Season subscriptions go on sale Feb. 9 and are available for as low as $126 (A Christmas Carol is a “bonus” show).

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

An appalling ‘review’ of ‘Rocky Horror’ (not mine)


Rest assured: Seeing this play won’t make you gay … no matter what The Column says.

OK, I was gonna post my review this morning of Dallas Theater Center’s production of The Rocky Horror Show, but I decided to interrupt that plan to do something I never, ever do: Publicly call out another “review.” (Here’s my review.)

In the theater blog called The Column, Mary L. Clark reviewed the show … at least, that’s what they call it. The first quarter of the nearly 3,000 word piece is culled from Wikipedia, and after that, it delves into press releases and Playbill notes before, somewhere around paragraph 6, finally mentioning the current production.

All of this — and even such cringe-worthy malapropisms are referring to the “free sex generation” (she means, I assume, “free love” — everyone knows, sex is never free) — are tolerable. But as someone who directed my attention to this story pointed out, she refers to out director Joel Ferrell’s “lifestyle choice” being affected by the show.

Ummm…. what?

I really, really thought we had progressed past the point one’s innate sexual orientation was labeled — insultingly, ignorantly, regressively — as a “choice” and a “lifestyle.” She even concludes with this caveat: “I never thought about gender equality when seeing Rocky Horror. … Don’t be worried you are going to be pro-gay rallied or asked to make any choices other than to have a really good time.” OK, poor writing aside, this comes dangerously close to saying, “Rest assured: You can’t ‘catch gay’ watching this show.” It made me throw up a bit in my mouth.

(By the way: I loved the show. And it won’t make you gay anymore than watching Love, American Style as a kid made me straight.)

This weekend, a writer for the New York Times got vilified after referring to TV showrunner Shonda Rhimes (Scandal, Grey’s Anatomy) as an “angry black woman.” At least she didn’t say being a black woman was a “choice” or a “lifestyle.” I guess we still have a long way to go.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Heather Kitchen retiring from DTC

Heather Kitchen

Many professions are about forming relationships — some necessary, some welcomed — and when someone clicks with you personally, it makes your job all that much better. In the nearly five years I’ve known Heather Kitchen, she’s been one of the best working relationships I’ve encountered. From the first day we met, she’s greeted me with “Hey, Arnie!” every time she sees me. She has that familiar, dare I say motherly, aura, the kind that makes you feel like you’ve made her day better when in fact it is she who has improved yours.

Since 2011, she’s led the business side of the Dallas Theater Center as its managing director, giving the support that artistic director Kevin Moriarty has needed to make exciting theater and revitalize the 55-year-old institution. By keeping it in the black — and always with a smile — she’s actually contributed to the artistry, and more importantly, the tone of theater in all of North Texas.

So her decision to retire — at 62, she’s been involved in arts administration for 40 years — just as the DTC begins its new season is a personal loss as well as a professional one. She’ll stay on until her successor is found (probably early 2015), but whoever it will be could never replace Heather. She’s someone I’ll miss.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

DTC donates nearly $60K to NTFB

ACC NTFB Check Presentation - Kris Martin, Kieran Connolly - by Dana Driensky

Former Dallas Voice staffer Kris Martin, as representative for the NTFB, collects a check from Scrooge (actor Kieran Connolly) at the final performance of ‘A Christmas Carol’ at the Wyly Theatre. Additional donations at that performance raised the total donation to nearly $58,000.

For six Christmases, the Dallas Theater Center has collected canned food and cash from patrons at its annual production of A Christmas Carol, and this year was an especially good one. For its first time since returning to the Arts District — and its first time in the Wyly Theatre — the DTC managed 934 pounds of nonperishable goods (nearly twice the amount taken in last year at the Kalita Humphreys) and raised $57,993.81 in cash donations (above the average for prior years). That brings the total monetary donations — donated to the North Texas Food Bank — to $297,912.16 since 2008. Each dollar accounts for about three meals donated to the hungry across the Metroplex.

We’re big fans of the NTFB here at the Voice — I decorate a cake every year for charity, and the NTFB is a feeder donator the Resource Center’s food pantry — so we’re happy to see how generous people are. But the need continues beyond Christmas; you can donate time, food or money here.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

DTC announces 2012-13 season

The Dallas Theater Center’s fourth season at the Wyly Theatre continues to extend performances into the Kalita Humphreys space where Uptown Players calls home, but this will officially be the last year A Christmas Carol is performed there. The upcoming season itself claims lots of new works or regional premieres in an eclectic season of comedy, professional wrestling, flying men and musicals with the word “fly” in the title.

See the schedule of shows after the jump.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Queer locals of 2011

As we crown our local LGBT Person of the Year on the front page, over here in Life+Style we’ve been thinking about the locals who we will forever relate to helping define 2011 from the standpoint of entertainment and culture. Here are the ones who made the year memorable.

— Arnold Wayne Jones



Anthony Chisom
activist, left

Derrick Spillman,
activist, right
In a short time, these two have made waves across the local LGBT African-American community. Chisom erased lines of gay and straight to focus on Dallasites with his foundation’s inaugural South Dallas AIDS Walk, which raised more than $10,000 in March. Spillman’s work with the DFW Pride Movement  stepped up Dallas Black Pride. With marquee speakers and a schedule of both educational and got entertaining sessions, The Movement the rep it’s been working for.



Joel Ferrell
theater queen
Whether producing Arsenic and Old Lace or directing two of the best shows of the year, Ferrell has been a force in Dallas theater since joining the DTC as an associate artist, and the community is richer for his vision and tireless work as a director, choreographer and all-around talent.



Linda Moore &
Laurie Foley
dog lovers
Moore and her partner Foley are devoted dog breeders, and in 2011 their cocker Beckham stormed Westminster, and ended the year as the top dog of any breed, anywhere, in America. Wow.



Charles Santos
task master
As executive director of TITAS, Santos is used to bringing talent to Texas, but it was his inspired idea of celebrating AIDS at 30 with A Gathering that reminded locals of his devotion to AIDS fundraising.



Mark Trimble
bear-ish fundraiser
Trimble and the guys of BearDance came into their own this year with their dance party nights. The highlight was the TBRU party, and with three events during 2011, BearDance raised an impressive $22,000-plus for area charities.



Leslie Ezelle
cancer survivor/TV star
Just weeks after completing chemotherapy, Ezelle landed on TV’s Next Design Star. She didn’t win, but her celebrity, paired with the experience of beating breast cancer, has made her a devoted fundraiser for the
Susan G. Komen Foundation.



David Berryman
gayborhood cheerleader
For years, Berryman has been the largely quiet behind-the- scenes guy for events like the Pride parade, but in 2011, after talks of the possible cancelation of Easter in the Park, Berryman stepped in, offering to coordinate it and obtaining the funding, literally saving Easter in the gayborhood.



Craig Lynch & Jeff Rane
theatrical impresarios
Ten years after founding Uptown Players as an upstart theater troupe doing gay-themed work, Lynch and Rane launched the first-ever gay theater festival to coincide with Pride Week at the historic Kalita Humphreys Theater, their impressive new home. Way to go in a decade!



Chris Heinbaugh
re-committed arts lover
After years as Mayor Leppert’s right-hand man, the former actor and TV reporter left politics to return to his first love — the arts — by working with the AT&T Performing Arts Center.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition December 23, 2011.

—  Kevin Thomas

Applause: Stage pink

Queer highlights from the upcoming theater season

RICH LOPEZ  | Staff Writer

Anticipation should be strong for the upcoming theater season in general. Ambitious shows like Giant, The Tempest, West Side Story and Hairspray all dot the stage horizon.
But we also like to see some of our own up there. As we look over the upcoming offerings from local theater companies, we always ask, “Where’s the gay?”  In addition to Uptown Players’ first  Dallas Pride Performing Arts Festival, here are some of the others.



Although the Dallas Opera canceled the opera she was set to star in, lesbian soprano Patricia Racette will still perform at a TDO gala. (Photo Devon Cass)

Singer-songwriter Duncan Sheik gave an indie music flair to the musical adaptation of the 1891 play Spring Awakening. Set in 19th century Germany, Awakening follows a group of youths as they discover more about themselves and their rapidly developing sexuality.

The original Frank Wedekind play was controversial in its day, depicting abortion, homosexuality, rape and suicide. Now the show just has an added rock ‘n’ roll score. Along with Sheik’s musical perspective, Steven Slater wrote the book and lyrics in this updated version which debuted in 2006 on Broadway and won the Tony for Best Musical. Terry Martin directs.

WaterTower Theater, 15650 Addison Road., Addison. Sept. 30–Oct. 23.

It’s almost un-Texan if you’re gay and not familiar with Del Shores’ tales of Southern discomfort.  Southern Baptist Sissies and Sordid Lives are pretty much part of the queer vernacular in these parts, but Shores got his start way back in 1987.

How will those northern folks take to Shores work (And by north, we mean past Central Expressway past LBJ)? Jeni Helms directs Daddy’s Dyin’: Who’s Got the Will for McKinney Repertory Theatre this fall. As the family patriarch suffers a stroke, the Turnover family gathers as they wait for his death. This family may just put the fun in dysfunctional.

McKinney Performing Arts Center, 111 N. Tennessee St., McKinney. Sept. 30–Oct. 7.

WingSpan Theatre Co. will produce one of the greater comedies of theater-dom this fall: Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest, with Nancy Sherrard sparring over the gay wit’s price bon mots as Lady Bracknell.

Bath House Cultural Center, 521 E. Lawther Drive. Oct. 6–22.

Although A Catered Affair might sound a bit like My Big Fat Greek Wedding, it has the added flair of Harvey Fierstein’s wit. That’s because he wrote the book for the show alongside John Bucchino’s music and lyrics. The play is based on the Gore Vidal-penned 1956 film The Catered Affair starring Bette Davis.

When Jane and Ralph decide to get married, Jane’s mom Agnes wants to put on an elaborate spectacle of a wedding. The truth is, she can’t afford it and Jane isn’t all too thrilled about a huge affair. As in most cases, the wedding planning is more about the mom than the daughter and Agnes soon realizes the fact. Jane’s Uncle Winston — the proverbial gay uncle — is left off the guest list and is rightfully pissed. But as most gay characters, he rallies to be the voice of reason and support.

Theatre Three, 2800 Routh Street, Ste.168. Oct. 13–Nov. 12.

Lesbian soprano Patricia Racette was going to be featured in the production of Katya Kabanová but unfortunately the show was canceled by the Dallas Opera. But fear not. Dallas will still get to bask in the greatness that is her voice as Racette will perform An Evening with Patricia Racette, a cabaret show with classics from the Great American Songbook for a patron recital.

Winspear Opera House, 2403 Flora St. Nov. 9.



Nancy Sherrard will star as Lady Bracknell in WIngSpan Theater Co.’s fall production of Oscar Wilde’s ‘The Importance of Being Earnest,’ perhaps the greatest comedy ever written by theaterdom’s gayest wit.

Kevin Moriarty directs Next Fall for the Dallas Theater Center next spring. Written by Geoffrey Nauffts, the play centers on Luke and Adam, a couple with some unusual issues. What’s new about that in gay couplehood? Not much, but when Adam’s an absolute atheist and Luke’s a devout Christian, the two have been doing their best to make it work.
The comedy played on Broadway in 2010, garnering Tony and Drama Desk nominations. And now Dallas gets to see how, as DTC puts it, “relationships can be a beautiful mess.”
Kalita Humphreys Theater, 3636 Turtle Creek Blvd. April 13–May 6.

Perhaps the most surprising queer offering this next season is Theatre Arlington’s production of The Laramie Project. The show usually creates quite a stir — at least it did in Tyler, thanks to Trinity Wheeler — so how will this suburban audience handle it? Doesn’t matter. Props to T.A. for taking Moises Kaufman’s play about the tragic bashing and death of Matthew Shepard to its community.

Theatre Arlington, 305 W. Main St., Arlington. May 18–June 3.

Usually the question with MBS Productions is “what’s not gay?” Founder Mark-Brian Sonna has consistently delivered tales of gay woe and love that are sometimes silly and sometimes sweet, but always a laugh.

This season is no different. Playwright Alejandro de la Costa brings back drag queen Lovely Uranus in The Importance of Being Lovely. The last time we saw Uranus, Sonna wore the stilettos and pink wig in last season’s Outrageous, Sexy, (nekkid) Romp.  This time around, Uranus graduates to leading lady status as the show is all about her as audiences follow her through the changes she makes in her make-up, wigs and men.

Stone Cottage Theatre, 15650 Addison Road, Addison. July 16–Aug. 11, 2012.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition August 26, 2011.

—  Michael Stephens