Fort Worth school board candidate: gays ignore basic truth by being gay

Sultan Cole

The Rev. Sultan Cole

God’s candidate, the Rev. Sultan Cole, is one of three candidates for the District 2 race for the Fort Worth school board. And he has a few opinions to share with you.

It just so happens I’m paid to hear idiots froth at the mouth, especially really crazy anti-LGBT stuff. As a pastor of his church, he has the privilege of reminding his congregants of the sins of the Undesirables, which you can see in the video below. In case you’d rather drink than watch his snake charming, here’s the gist of the screeds spilling out of the mouth of the Rev. Cole:

• Adam and Steve aren’t cool because God made “male and female,” and “males and females function well together,” especially at child birthing age.

• At 1:24 he evokes the biblical characters of Eve and Janice, who wish to make a child despite it not being God’s will. (I look forward to spending my weekend hunting for the lost book of Janice the Sodomite.)

Again, I’m not sharing this because it’s 3:15 p.m. on Friday, and I’m really tired, and I just want to go home. No, I’m telling you: God’s candidate is running in district 2 against incumbent Tobi Jackson and educator Joel Aguilar. God’s candidate is on the ballot tomorrow, Election Day.

Find your polling place here then head to the polls tomorrow between  7 a.m.–7 a.m. and vote. If you don’t, someone like Rev. Cole just might win.

—  James Russell

Meet the candidates for city, school board in Dallas

vote-buttonDallas city and school board joint elections are fast approaching — set for May 9 — and many candidates are taking every opportunity to get out and meet their potential constituents and win some votes. The Friends of the Dallas Public Library will be holding receptions for candidates in different districts over the next week (beginning tonight), and the Preston Hollow Democrats have invited candidates to their meeting on Thursday.

Friends of the Dallas Public Library candidate receptions

Tonight (Tuesday, April 7), Friends of the Dallas Public Library are holding a “Meet The Candidates” reception, for District 6 candidates, from 7-9 p.m. at the Bachman Lake Branch Library, 9480 Webb Chapel Road.

On Thursday (April 9), the Friends hold a reception for the District 9 and 10 candidates, from 7-9 p.m., at the Audelia Road Branch Library, 10045 Audelia Road. And next Tuesday (April 14), they host a reception for the Districts 4 and 8 candidates, from 7-9 p.m., at the Paul Laurence Dunbar Lancaster-Kiest Branch Library, 2008 E. Kiest Road.

All of the receptions will include a moderated discussion, including questions from the audience. It is free and open to the public.

For information on the Friends of the Dallas Public Library go here.

Preston Hollow Democrats

Preston Hollow Democrats have invited candidates for mayor and city council  districts 2, 6, 10, 11 and 13, and candidates for the Dallas ISD place trustee race to speak at their meeting from 6-8 p.m. Thursday, April 9, in the auditorium of the Preston Royal Library, 5626 Royal Lane.

Each candidate will be given the Preston Hollow Dems members why he or she is running for office and why they deserve their constituents’ votes. Although city and school elections are non-partisan races, “the Preston Hollow Democrats believe that it is important to hear and consider each candidates and to encourage its members, guests and all voters to vote in these elections.

Candidates who have accepted the invitation to speak to PHD, as of this morning, are: Mayor Mike Rawlings, Marco Ronquillo, Deputy Mayor Pro Tem Monica Alonzo, Councilman Adam Medrano, Paul Reyes (may send a representative to speak), James White (may send a representative to speak), Councilman Lee Kleinman, Councilwoman Jennifer Staubach Gates, Dr. Edwin Flores and Dr. Kyle Renard.

For information on Preston Hollow Democrats, go here.


Dallas City Council candidates are:

Place 1 — Scott Griggs; Place 2 — Adam Medrano; Place 3 — Casey Thomas II; Gerald Britt; Joe Tave; Wini Cannon; and B.D. Howard; Place 4 — Stephen King, Linda M. Wilkerson-Wynn, Sandra Crenshaw, Keyaira D. Saunders, James Ross, D. Marcus Ranger, Carl Hays and Carolyn King Arnold; Place 5 — Jesse Diaz, Rick Callahan, Sherry Cordova; Place 6 — Ozumba Lnuk-X, Daniel “DC” Caldwell, Lakolya London and Monica R. Alonzo; Place 7 — Tiffinni A. Young, Hasani Burton, John Lawson, Kevin Felder, James “J.T” Turknett, Randall Parker, Baranda J. Fermin and Juanita Wallace; Place 8 — Dianne Gibson, Clara McDade, Subrina Lynn Brenham, Eric Lemonte Williams, Gail Terrell and Erik Wilson; Place 9 —Christopher Jackson, Darren Boruff, Mark Clayton, Sam Merten and Will Logg; Place 10 —James N. White, Paul Reyes and Adam McGough; Place 11 — Lee M. Kleinman; Place 12 — Sandy Greyson; Place 13 — Jennifer Staubach Gates; Place 14 — Phillip T. Kingston; Place 15 (Mayor) — Mike Rawlings, Marcos Ronquillo and write-in Richard P. Sheridan.

For information on Dallas City Council elections go here.

Dallas ISD Board of Trustee candidates are:

District 1 — Edwin Flores and Kyle Renard; District 3 — Dan Micciche and David Lewis; and District 9 — Bernadette Nutall and Damarcus Offord.

For information on Dallas ISD elections go here.

—  Tammye Nash

Jeb Bush considering presidential run because the world needs more shrubs in office

Former Florida Governor Jeb Bush, son of a former president, brother to a war criminal who lied about torturing people another and father to my neighbor who never welcomed me to the neighborhood Land Commissioner-elect George P. Bush of Fort Worth, announced this morning (Tuesday, Dec. 16) he’s exploring a run for president on the Republican ticket.

He announced his plans in a Facebook post.

Here are my feelings (h/t BuzzFeed):

—  James Russell

Libby Willis campaign election night watch party

Posted on 06 Nov 2014 at 1:37pm
Democrat Libby Willis faced an uphill climb against Republican Sen.-elect Konni Burton in the race to succeed Democrat Wendy Davis of Fort Worth. But that did not stop a devoted group of supporters from attending her watch party at Mamma Mia, 3124 E Belknap, in Fort Worth. At 10:30 p.m., Willis conceded.

DCDP hosts Leticia Van de Putte on Tuesday, Oct. 28 in Oak Cliff

Leticia Van de PutteThe Dallas County Democratic Party has moved its Tuesday, Oct. 28 get out the vote rally with Sen. Leticia Van de Putte, who is running for Lieutenant Governor,  to Oak Cliff Tower, 400 S. Zang Blvd. at 5:30 p.m. Attendees will be encouraged to vote following the rally.

Early voting continues throughout the week until Friday, Oct. 31. Early voting in Dallas County runs 7 a.m.–7 p.m. every day this week. The Oak Cliff Sub-Courthouse is an early voting location and is next door to Oak Cliff Tower.

Click here for early voting locations across Dallas County.

—  James Russell

Know your rights; make your vote count

U.S. Rep Eddie Bernice Johnson

U.S. Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson

By Congresswoman Eddie Bernice Johnson

Special Contributor


Unlike any other time in American history, it is important for all eligible citizens to exercise their right to vote on Nov. 4.

Recently, there has been significant dialogue regarding which party will control the House and the Senate in Washington. These conversations highlight a very real point: This election is critical to the future of minorities and middle-class Americans.

Voter engagement is crucial.

In minority communities, there is a common misconception that voter turnout is only important during presidential elections. But adhering to this school of thought could result in more than a decade of financial and political oppression.

It is not enough to see massive voter turnout in 2016; the same level of voter turnout must occur on Nov. 4.

Since the election of President Barack Obama, America’s first African-American president, the Republican Party has become the “Obstructionist” Party. During the current Congress, the GOP has done everything in its power to ensure the ineffective operation of our federal government. For example, in 2013 the Republican Party caused a government shutdown.

Now, with the help of the U.S.  Supreme Court, the Obstructionist Party has shifted its efforts to implementing new voter ID laws and unconstitutional “poll taxes” that block the votes of approximately 600,000 eligible voters in Texas.

The new Texas voter ID law lists state driver’s licenses, voter identification certificates, state ID cards, concealed gun permits, military IDs, citizenship certificates and passports as the only forms of permissible voter identification.

Student ID cards, issued by the state’s colleges and universities, and other forms of government identification, including a voter registration card, are not acceptable forms of ID under the law.

The ability to utilize concealed gun licenses as a form of acceptable voter identification highlights the reality that these new laws were created to favor a specific demographic, while disenfranchising others. Why would a state deliberately violate the civil rights of millions of its residents?

Research shows that if African-Americans and Latinos successfully turned out to vote, many so-called red states would become blue.

A Congress controlled by Democrats would guarantee a minimum wage of $10.10 an hour. This would occur during the first 100 days of a new Congress.

Additionally, increased access to early childhood education would become a reality, and the Equal Pay Act, which ensures that women earn the same wages as their male counterparts, would go into effect.

But none of these vital changes will occur without proper voter education and participation.

To be prepared for the Nov. 4 election, I encourage all voters to prepare themselves by visiting to confirm their registration status. Voters can also visit www.votetexasgov to learn their correct polling places, and know their rights.

Do not allow yourself to be denied your right to vote based on technicalities. Educate yourself and vote on Nov. 4 to strengthen our democracy.

U.S. Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson represents Texas’ 30th congressional district in the United States House of Representatives. She is a longtime ally of the LGBT community.

—  Tammye Nash

Elections 2014: Get ready, early voting begins today

VOTEEarly voting begins today, Monday, Oct. 20, and runs through Friday, Oct. 31. There’s a whole lot on the ballot locally and statewide from contested races at the top of the ballot all the way down to local bond packages. Watch for coverage here at Instant Tea until Election Day, Tuesday, Nov. 4.

But before I get to coverage, learn what you need below to vote per the Texas Secretary of State’s, a clearinghouse of information on voting.

The deadline to register to vote in Texas has expired. But if you are registered, you must present one of seven valid forms of identification.

The U.S. Supreme Court’s  Saturday, Oct. 18 upheld the state’s voter ID law. This means Texas voters will be required to present one of seven types of photo identification to be eligible to vote.

The seven forms of identification permitted are:

  • Texas driver license—unexpired or expired no longer than 60 days at the time of voting
  • Texas personal identification card—unexpired or expired no longer than 60 days at the time of voting
  • Texas concealed handgun license—unexpired or expired no longer than 60 days at the time of voting
  • U.S. passport book or card—unexpired or expired no longer than 60 days at the time of voting
  • U.S. Military identification with photo—unexpired or expired no longer than 60 days at the time of voting
  • U.S. Citizenship Certificate or Certificate of Naturalization with photo
  • Election Identification Certificate (E.I.C.)

According to the Texas Department of Public Safety, if you do not have one of the first six forms of identification only then may you apply for the E.I.C. at no charge. (Getting to a D.P.S. location and standing in line is a whole different story, however.)

Learn more about the getting an E.I.C. here.

During the early voting period, you may vote at any designated voting site in your county.

On Election Day, Tuesday, Nov. 4. you must vote at your precinct’s designated voting site.

Need more information?

Collin County 1-800-687-8546

Dallas County 214-819-6300

Denton County 940-349-3200

Tarrant County 817-831-8683

—  James Russell

Voter ID law ruling overturned, photo ID required for 2014 elections

voteThe 5th Circuit of Appeals yesterday, Oct. 14, overturned a Friday, Oct. 11 ruling by U.S. District Judge Nelva Ramos declaring the Texas voter ID law unconstitutional.

The appeals court ruling stated that Ramos’ decision “substantially disturbs the election process of the State of Texas just nine days before early voting begins. Thus, the value of preserving the status quo here is much higher than in most other contexts.”

Ramos, who was appointed by President Obama to the court, in her ruling called the law a “poll tax” and “discriminatory toward African-Americans and Hispanics.” Her ruling called for the 2014 elections to proceed without the strict voter ID law, which requires voters present one of seven forms of photo identification.

Opponents argued the law was intended to squash the voting rights of minorities and college students, many of whom traditionally vote Democratic.

Plaintiffs, including Rep. Marc Veasey, D-Fort Worth, the NAACP Legal Defense Fund and Campaign Legal Center plan to appeal to U.S. Supreme court to overturn the ruling, reports the Texas Tribune.

Texas Secretary of State Nandita Berry, the state’s top elections administrator, said the court’s stay ”means photo ID requirements will continue to be in effect for the November 4 Election, just as they have been for the last three statewide elections. Voters should prepare, as many already have, to show one of seven approved forms of photo ID if they plan to vote in person.”

There is still time to get one of the seven qualifying photo identification cards before early voting begins on Monday, Oct. 20. You may obtain a photo ID any time before the Nov. 4 election. More information is available here.

The deadline to register to vote — not obtain a photo ID — was Oct. 6.

—  James Russell

Davis Campaign to Hold “Out for Wendy” Day of Action Across Texas

WDNCODThe Wendy Davis campaign will celebrate National Coming Out Day tomorrow, Saturday, Oct. 11, with “Out for Wendy” canvassing events across the state.

Joining LGBT Texans will be Houston Mayor Annise Parker, Amber Davis, daughter of Wendy Davis, and other campaign surrogates.

Click here to RSVP.


WHAT: Out for Wendy Day of Action

WHO: Amber Davis, daughter of Wendy Davis

WHEN: 9:00 AM

WHERE: Austin Coordinated Campaign Office

1910 E. MLK Boulevard

Austin, Texas 78702


WHAT: Out for Wendy Day of Action

WHO: Zac Petkanas, Communications Director for Wendy Davis for Governor Campaign

WHEN: 10:00 AM

WHERE: Oak Lawn Library

4100 Cedar Springs Road

Dallas, Texas 75219


WHAT: Out for Wendy Day of Action

WHEN: 9:00 AM

WHERE: Starbucks

2720 W. University Drive

Edinburg, Texas 78539

Fort Worth

WHAT: Out for Wendy Day of Action

WHO: Libby Willis (Candidate for State Senate – District 10)

WHEN: 10:00 AM

WHERE: Davis Campaign Field Office

La Gran Plaza – Suite 1711

4200 S. Freeway

Fort Worth, Texas 76115


WHAT: Out for Wendy Day of Action

WHO: Houston Mayor Annise Parker

WHEN: 2:00 PM

WHERE: Matthiesen Law Firm

511 Lovett Boulevard

Houston, Texas 77004


WHAT: Out for Wendy Day of Action

WHEN: 9:00 AM

WHERE: Davis Campaign Field Office

1701 Jacaman Road, Suite 1

Laredo, Texas 78041

San Antonio

WHAT: Out for Wendy Day of Action

WHEN: 12:30 PM

WHERE: Sparky’s Pub

1416 N. Main Avenue

San Antonio, Texas 78212

—  James Russell

Last day to register to vote for November 4 election

vote-buttonToday is the last day to register to vote in the November 4 general election.


Register in person at your county Voter Registrar’s office. (In most Texas counties, the Tax Assessor-Collector is also the Voter Registrar. In some counties, the County Clerk or Elections Administrator registers voters.)

Or you can register by mail by obtaining an application from your county Voter Registrar’s office or the Secretary of State’s office. You can also pick up applications at libraries, government offices, or high schools.

As I reported in this week’s edition, a recent poll showed a single digit difference between gubernatorial nominees Wendy Davis and Greg Abbott. Every vote counts.

See you at the polls.

—  James Russell