Texas Teen Claims Sexual Advances Caused Him to Beat Fellow Male Student to Death, Burn the Body

Crime_texas

A gruesome story is unfolding in Pearland, Texas, south of Houston, ABC13 reports:

"Authorities now say that Joshua Wilkerson, 18 (above left), was beaten with a large wooden rod and that his body was burned. Hermilio Moralez, 19 (right), is charged with murder in Wilkerson's death. According to court documents, Wilkerson gave Moralez a ride home from school Tuesday and Moralez stated that Wilkerson began to make sexual advances towards him. Moralez said they got out of the truck and began to fight when Wilkerson grabbed a large wooden rod and tried to hit him. Moralez said he took the piece of wood from Wilkerson and began to hit him with it. He said Wilkerson was not moving afterwards."

Moralez also apparently tried to take a police officer's gun from its holster while he was leading authorities to the body. He has been "charged with failure to identify and attempting to take a weapon from a peace officer. His bond on those two charges are ,000 and ,000, respectively. No bond has been set for the murder charge."

Watch a brief news conference, AFTER THE JUMP



Towleroad News #gay

—  admin

Steven Daigle hospitalized, arrested

Things could be going better for North Texas’ Steven Daigle. After he was booted from Big Brother in 2008, he told me that he tried to live by his grandmother’s advice while he was in the house: Never do anything you wouldn’t want to read about on the front page of the New York Times.

So much for that.

Daigle parlayed his quasi-fame into a quasi-career, going from reality TV footnote to hardcore gay porn actor — perhaps the only one ever to use his full, legal name as his porn name.

Now, he’s got another dubious moniker: Jail bird. JRL Charts, which touts itself as the “official” gay adult film industry publication, reports that Daigle and his boyfriend, fellow porn actor Trent Locke, were involved in a fight Monday that sent both to the hospital an landed Daigle in jail on $20,000 bond.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Lunchtime video: AC360 – Ted Haggard On Fellow Hypocrite Bishop Eddie Long


COOPER: Pastor Ted Haggard left his own mega-church after a scandal involving drugs and a male prostitute. This summer he returned to ministry launching a new much smaller church with his wife, Gayle, who’s the author of “Why I Stayed: The choices I made in my darkest hour.”

I also spoke with Pastor Troy Sanders, an openly gay minister at Victory Church outside Atlanta who in 2008 was part of a delegation from the group Soul Force which met with Bishop Long.

COOPER: Pastor Ted, obviously Bishop Long should be presumed innocent until proven guilty, but does it seem explainable to you that he would send out pictures of himself in skin-tight outfits to young men in his congregation?

PASTOR TED HAGGARD, SAINT JAMES CHURCH: Well, we know the pictures are there. We’re not sure where they came from. But there was a movement several years ago where people were concerned about the direction of the church. And there was kind of a masculine movement. Pastors are more masculine sometimes in certain churches; that doesn’t mean he’s guilty.

COOPER: Pastor Troy, how closely do you follow what Bishop Long’s church is doing? Because I read, the Southern Poverty Law Center in 2007, Pastor Troy called Eddie Long, quote, “one of the most virulently homophobic black leaders in the religiously based anti-gay movement.”

Is that an accurate description?

PASTOR TROY SANDERS, NATIONAL MINISTER, THE FELLOWSHIP: I think that there are a number of church leaders that come down rather hard on the LGBT community. Now, I was part of the Soul Force American Family Outing that actually took lesbian and gay family members into New Birth.

Full transcript is below the fold.
The CNN Transcript:

We begin though tonight, “Keeping Them Honest” with the sexual abuse allegations against one of most influential ministers in the country. The minister is Bishop Eddie Long of the New Birth Missionary Baptist Church outside Atlanta. Three young men now are suing Bishop Long accusing him of enticing them with money, cars, clothes and expensive jewelry in exchange for sexual favors.

These are just allegations at this point but what makes them so startling is that Bishop Long is leader not just of an African- American mega-church with 25,000 members, but a major opponent of same-sex marriage and homosexuality. Here’s some of what he’s preached in the past about gays and lesbians.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

BISHOP EDDIE LONG, NEW BIRTH MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH: And the problem today and the reason why society is like it is, is because men are being feminized and women are becoming masculine.

And everybody knows it’s dangerous to enter an exit. You cannot say I was born this way. I don’t care what scientists say. You can be converted. You were not born that way.

Let me pray with you. Let me tell you, don’t you be conformed to this world but be ye transformed. I don’t know what I am. Turn and take your clothes down and I’ll show you who you are.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

COOPER: That’s video from the Southern Poverty Law Center. These are photographs provided by the lawyer involved in this lawsuit, Maurice Robinson and Anthony Flagg, two of the men who have filed suit against the bishop. A third man, Jamal Paris (ph), not shown here has also filed suit.

These men were reportedly referred to by Bishop Long as spiritual sons, a special status his accusers say given to young men in his church whom they say he preyed on. According to the Flagg and Robinson lawsuits, Bishop Long’s accusers were 17 and 18 at the time the alleged encounters took place.

Anthony Flagg, the lawsuit alleges, had to share a bed with the bishop when they traveled together when Bishop Long allegedly took Maurice Robinson to New Zealand for his birthday. This is what his lawyer says happened.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

B.J. BERNSTEIN, LAWYER FOR MAURICE ROBINSON: On that 18th birthday, Bishop Long engaged in the act of oral sodomy with this young man.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

COOPER: Bishop Long’s third accuser, Jamal Paris, says the bishop would quote, “discuss Holy Scripture to justify and support the sexual activity.”

Now Bishop Long denies all of the allegations. These photos of Bishop Long in tight gym clothes which appear to have been taken by the bishop himself were reportedly sent to another one of his so- called spiritual sons and released by B.J. Bernstein, the attorney involved in the lawsuit who you just saw moments ago.

Bishop Long’s lawyer says the photos do not corroborate the charges and in a radio interview, the attorney said that Bishop Long is a health advocate and a weight lifter who wears muscle shirts.

Again we stress, these are allegations; three lawsuits by three men.

Earlier I spoke about the allegations though with two ministers with deep experience in the intersection of religious, sexuality and in the case of one of the ministers, national scandal.

Pastor Ted Haggard left his own mega-church after a scandal involving drugs and a male prostitute. This summer he returned to ministry launching a new much smaller church with his wife, Gayle, who’s the author of “Why I Stayed: The choices I made in my darkest hour.”

I also spoke with Pastor Troy Sanders, an openly gay minister at Victory Church outside Atlanta who in 2008 was part of a delegation from the group Soul Force which met with Bishop Long.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

COOPER: Pastor Ted, obviously Bishop Long should be presumed innocent until proven guilty, but does it seem explainable to you that he would send out pictures of himself in skin-tight outfits to young men in his congregation?

PASTOR TED HAGGARD, SAINT JAMES CHURCH: Well, we know the pictures are there. We’re not sure where they came from. But there was a movement several years ago where people were concerned about the direction of the church. And there was kind of a masculine movement. Pastors are more masculine sometimes in certain churches; that doesn’t mean he’s guilty.

COOPER: Pastor Troy, how closely do you follow what Bishop Long’s church is doing? Because I read, the Southern Poverty Law Center in 2007, Pastor Troy called Eddie Long, quote, “one of the most virulently homophobic black leaders in the religiously based anti-gay movement.”

Is that an accurate description?

PASTOR TROY SANDERS, NATIONAL MINISTER, THE FELLOWSHIP: I think that there are a number of church leaders that come down rather hard on the LGBT community. Now, I was part of the Soul Force American Family Outing that actually took lesbian and gay family members into New Birth.

COOPER: Right. You actually, you met with Bishop Long back in 2008.

SANDERS: Yes.

COOPER: What was your impression?

SANDERS: Well, the first impression that I had was very hospitable to us but it was very clear that there was a difference in theology. Like there was a very clear difference between what we believed and the oppressive theology that the church is known for.

COOPER: Pastor Ted, do you — has there been a — do you think this pastor was particularly homophobic?

HAGGARD: Well, the times I met him I didn’t get that indication. But I do think it’s important that churches be able to embrace the type of theology that they believe in and be able to communicate it with clarity. When a church embraces a certain theological slant, then people join with that, that’s why we have freedom of religion.

COOPER: Pastor Troy?

SANDERS: Anderson, with all due respect, I agree wholeheartedly that we have the right to believe what we believe but it is absolutely hypocritical if you’re going to stand in any pulpit across this country and preach against homosexuality when you have homosexual tendencies.

The gospel of Jesus Christ hinges on truth. And any message — I’m a preacher — and message — I’m also a same-gender loving man and as a requirement I cannot preach the gospel of Jesus Christ and not walk in truth around my sexuality. I cannot do it.

COOPER: Pastor Ted, what about that? I mean you weren’t one of the leading figures among evangelicals who preach anti-gay rhetoric but you made a number of comments over the years about homosexuality being a sin. You campaigned in support of the Defense of Marriage Act saying that it would be devastating for the children of our nation and for the future of western civilization. Did you feel like a hypocrite?

HAGGARD: Well, I think every Bible teacher struggles with some issues in the scripture. We’re responsible to teach the Bible. We teach pray continually, but every one of us are growing in our prayer lives. We haven’t achieved that. We all teach sexual fidelity in marriage and the Bible teaches that, we encourage people in that. But there are some times when adultery or different things come into the pulpit and come into the church.

It’s just like any ideal. We have police officers that get speeding tickets. We have — we have people in congress that write our tax legislation that don’t pay their taxes.

(CROSSTALK)

COOPER: But, Pastor Ted, there is a difference between, you know, somebody saying you should obey the law and you get a speeding ticket and somebody preaching something which is completely antithetical to a deeply-held — something that —

HAGGARD: I understand the point you’re making. I understand the point you’re making and I’m sympathetic to it. I just think it’s important to understand the human condition. And this is why Christ died for all of us. It’s because we have people all over the country that have said I’m going to be married to you until death to us part, good times, bad times, et cetera. They end up divorced.

People have ideals that they violate themselves because of things that go on in the human condition. And so I think all of us need to be aware of that before we start name-calling too quickly.

SANDERS: Ok. I’m not — certainly, Anderson, I’m not name- calling but I think that there has to be a place in our religious discourse to critique scripture. Because the same Bible now, the premise that I cannot stand for is that homosexuality is sin or wrong because the same scriptures that we use to lift up that said that women could not preach, that say we could not eat pork or that two twines of fabric could not be (INAUDIBLE) and that slavery was actually instigated and upheld by that same, ancient oppressive text.

At some point we have to re-evaluate what we believe. We cannot couch it in we all are sinners and we all have our shortcomings. No, there’s things we have to give off, we have to let go of around oppressive theology. And homosexuality and homosexual oppression, homophobia in the church is one of those things.

HAGGARD: So you’re promoting one biblical interpretation, so respect the other churches enough to promote a different one.

(CROSSTALK)

SANDERS: But we all do. That’s what we do as theologians, period. That’s what we do as preachers of the gospel. We stand up and present a gospel that is either inclusive or exclusive. We make that choice.

HAGGARD: Well, but that’s what you’re saying and that will work for your church and your congregation. But there may be a congregation down the street that wants to apply some different verses. And so let them work — let them work through that battle.

(CROSSTALK)

SANDERS: If we’re going to apply differences let’s walk in truth, though. We have to walk in truth.

(CROSSTALK)

HAGGARD: Everybody says —

SANDERS: We cannot preach a gospel that we do not live. If we know we are same-gender loving we should not get up in pulpits and preach against it.

HAGGARD: Everybody says they walk in truth.

COOPER: Let me ask the Pastor Ted —

HAGGARD: Yes, well, every — everybody — everybody thinks they — it — it’s — you’re claiming — you’re calling other people names. You’re claiming to have the perfect understanding.

SANDERS: No, I’m not. I’m not.

HAGGARD: And I’m just saying you need to be more inclusive yourself.

SANDERS: I — Pastor Ted, I am certainly not claiming to have any perfect understanding.

But what I am claiming to say is that when we get up, we make a choice as to whether we preach inclusion or exclusion, whether we’re divisive with our theology, and whether we walk in truth.

COOPER: If it turns out this is true, what — Pastor Ted, what do you think it says about this bishop?

HAGGARD: I think every person that loves the Scriptures and loves God wants to be a better man than they are. And everyone is growing from glory to glory to glory. Everyone is in a process under the word of God and with one another and with the Holy Spirit, and that we need to let that process continue.

COOPER: Pastor Troy, let me ask you essentially the same question.

SANDERS: If this is true, then there are internal contradictions that are playing out in the public eye.

COOPER: Pastor Ted Haggard —

HAGGARD: I think —

COOPER: Sorry. Go ahead.

HAGGARD: I think there are internal contradictions in everyone about a variety of things.

SANDERS: I agree with you wholeheartedly, but this gospel of liberation we preach calls us all on the carpet. I’m not excluded. Ted Haggard, you wasn’t excluded. And Bishop Eddie Long is not excluded either.

COOPER: Pastor Ted Haggard —

HAGGARD: But here’s what I’m saying. Those — those who independently chose to call me on the carpet were not helpful. It was those who loved me, helped me, comforted me. And this type of broad- based, generalized analysis of people outside your group is not what’s helpful to him or to the process.

SANDERS: And what I’m saying is, it didn’t take a scandal for me to come out and walk in truth. I called myself on the carpet and others.

HAGGARD: That’s your choice.

SANDERS: So, there are other options, besides waiting until we get into scandal, to be called on the carpet around walking in truth.

(CROSSTALK)

HAGGARD: But that’s every human being’s choice. This is America. You can’t use your religion to tyrannize others.

COOPER: Guys, an interesting discussion.

Pastor Ted Haggard, Troy Sanders, appreciate your perspectives. Thank you.

SANDERS: Thank you.

Pam’s House Blend – Front Page

—  John Wright

Swarm up for Black Tie Dinner at Ghostbar tonight

‘Get wired for Black Tie Dinner’

Black Tie Dinner knows how to tease us social media folk. They’ve planned a social swarm party that caters to the Foursquare and Tweeter in all of us. Once you unlock your Foursquare swarm badges, then you can drink the night away, socialize with fellow Twitters (you thought we’d say “twits,” huh?) and hang with party host Kellie Raspberry from “Kidd Kraddick in the Morning.” Consider this the mixer of the week. We are.

DEETS: Ghostbar at the W Hotel, 2440 Victory Park Lane, Suite 3300. 6 p.m. RSVP required.

—  Rich Lopez

Query • 08.13.10

If same-sex marriage were legally recognized in your state, would you marry your partner?

………………………………………..

Thomas Combs — “After 12 years, yes probably so. Its a long time to be waiting.”

Ray Lipsch — “Yes. Absolutely. Will probably go to Washington, D.C. or California soon regardless.”

Lisa Dub Windsor — “Personally, it’s not for me but I support any of my fellow LGBT friends who want to do it.”

Molli Jones — “I don’t have a partner, but to know I can marry her is a wonderful feeling!”

Andrew S. Dial — “The same day!”

Kissiah Aiken — “If I was asked, yes.”

………………………………………..

Have a suggestion for a question you’d like us to ask?
E-mail it to nash@dallasvoice.com.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition August 13, 2010.


—  Kevin Thomas

Dallas could elect 1st gay judge

Judicial candidates John Loza, Tonya Parker among 4 LGBTs running in local races in 2010

By John Wright | News Editor wright@dallasvoice.com
IN THE RUNNING | Dallas County District Clerk Gary Fitzsimmons, clockwise from top left, County Judge Jim Foster, attorney Tonya Parker and former Councilman John Loza are LGBT candidates who plan to run in Dallas County elections in 2010. The filing period ends Jan. 4.

Dallas County has had its share of openly gay elected officials, from Sheriff Lupe Valdez to District Clerk Gary Fitzsimmons to County Judge Jim Foster.
But while Foster, who chairs the Commissioners Court, is called a “judge,” he’s not a member of the judiciary, to which the county’s voters have never elected an out LGBT person.

Two Democrats running in 2010 — John Loza and Tonya Parker — are hoping to change that.

“This is the first election cycle that I can remember where we’ve had openly gay candidates for the judiciary,” said Loza, a former Dallas City Councilman who’s been involved in local LGBT politics for decades. “It’s probably long overdue, to be honest with you.”

Dallas County’s Jerry Birdwell became the first openly gay judge in Texas when he was appointed by Gov. Ann Richards in 1992. But after coming under attack for his sexual orientation by the local Republican Party, Birdwell, a Democrat, lost his bid for re-election later that year.

Also in the November 1992 election, Democrat Barbara Rosenberg defeated anti-gay Republican Judge Jack Hampton.

But Rosenberg, who’s a lesbian, wasn’t out at the time and didn’t run as an openly LGBT candidate.

Loza, who’s been practicing criminal law in Dallas for the last 20 years, is running for the County Criminal Court No. 5 seat. Incumbent Tom Fuller is retiring. Loza said he expects to face three other Democrats in the March primary, meaning a runoff is likely. In addition to groups like Stonewall Democrats of Dallas, he said he’ll seek an endorsement from the Washington, D.C.-based Gay and Lesbian Victory Fund, which provides financial backing to LGBT candidates nationwide.

Parker, who’s running for the 116th Civil District Court seat, declined to be interviewed for this story. Incumbent Bruce Priddy isn’t expected to seek re-election, and Parker appears to be the favorite for the Democratic nomination.

If she wins in November, Parker would become the first LGBT African-American elected official in Dallas County.

Loza and Parker are among four known local LGBT candidates in 2010.
They join fellow Democrats Fitzsimmons and Foster, who are each seeking a second four-year term.

While Foster is vulnerable and faces two strong challengers in the primary, Fitzsimmons is extremely popular and said he’s confident he’ll be re-elected.

“I think pretty much everybody knows that the District Clerk’s Office is probably the best-run office in Dallas County government,” Fitzsimmons said. “I think this county is a Democratic County, and I think I’ve proved myself to be an outstanding county administrator, and I think the people will see that.”

Randall Terrell, political director for Equality Texas, said this week he wasn’t aware of any openly LGBT candidates who’ve filed to run in state races in 2010.

Although Texas made headlines recently for electing the nation’s first gay big-city mayor, the state remains one of 20 that lack an out legislator.

Denis Dison, a spokesman for the Victory Fund, said he’s hoping Annise Parker’s victory in Houston last week will inspire more qualified LGBT people to run for office.

“It gives other people permission really to think of themselves as leaders,” Dison said.

The filing period for March primaries ends Jan. 4.


This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition December 18, 2009.

—  admin