Micki Pacific leaves Resource Center food pantry, moves to Northwest


Tree hugger Micki Diane Pacific

Micki Diane Pacific left Resource Center this week where she was manager of the Food Pantry and hot meals program.

During her tenure at Resource Center she led the team that started the GEAR transgender program, and the Trans Health Clinic.

“I am moving to Washington state to be a socialist, tree-hugging hippie!” she said. “I plan to get a kayak and get my snowboard back out on the ski slopes there.”

In Washington, she’ll be part of several worker-owned cooperatives and helping with some new start-up businesses.

Pacific served in the Army working on top secret missions for the NSA. She also is a live sound engineer who has worked with more than 180 national performing artists, including John Fogerty, ZZTopp, Genesis and The Monkees.

“I will miss a lot of the great friendships that I have here,” she said.

During her 10 years at Resource Center, she estimates her programs have distributed more than 5,000 tons of food.

“It’s been an honor to be able to be part of that,” she said.

—  David Taffet

Uncertainty remains over future funding for ASOs

Clerical error rectified by Dallas County, but some agencies worry that more cuts are coming

Steven Pace

DAVID TAFFET  |  Staff Writer

Although initial reports of cuts in federal funding for meals programs for people with HIV/AIDS turned out to be a clerical error,  at least one Dallas County AIDS service agency still worries that cuts are coming.

Resource Center Dallas Strategic Communications and Programs Manager Rafael McDonnell said, “We’re still trying to assess the numbers and trying to see where we are.”

McDonnell said that the food pantry and meals program are not fully funded through government programs.

The agency also relies on a number of other grants from organizations like Mazon and on canned food drives run by community groups and businesses.

“We go into this budget year with a certain amount of uncertainty,” McDonnell said. “We are hopeful there are no cuts. It’s hard to determine if there will be.”

He added that the center will need all those who have supported its programs in the past to continue to do so into the future.

With federal and state governments slashing their budgets, McDonnell said that money could be cut at any time from the programs.

“Until we see the check in our hands,” they don’t count on the money, he said. “We’re doing the best we can, planning in an uncertain future.”

But the grant that comes through Dallas County has been restored for the immediate future for the Resource Center and AIDS Interfaith Network.

AIN relies on the grant money for a third of its meals program budget.

“The county did respond and did rectify the mistake,” AIN Executive Director Steven Pace said.

AIN has a weekday breakfast and lunch program and provides some weekend meals for persons with HIV. Resource Center Dallas runs a hot lunch program during the week.

Pace said that with grants of this type, there is always a degree of uncertainty. Even though the money has been restored for seven months, Congress can decide to cut funding to any program at any time.

He said it is just something nonprofit organizations that rely on government funding live with.

Because of a clerical mistake, funding for meals programs was moved to food pantry programs for the new fiscal year.

When AIN and RCD received emails confirming state grants that are funneled through Dallas County, the money for meals programs was omitted from the budget.

However, the money did not show up in the RCD grant budget even though that agency runs both meals and food pantry programs.

The state fiscal year begins Sept. 1 and final documentation needed to be back to the county by Aug. 12.

When Dallas County found the error, a new email was sent to the agencies. Pace worried at the time that he was missing the deadline to submit his budgets and documentation, but he has been assured the agency would not be penalized.

He said he promptly adjusted his figures and submitted the necessary paperwork to assure no interruption in funding.

RCD also readjusted its figures and resubmitted the paperwork.

Some years, grants are renewed from previous years. Other years, agencies must rebid to receive their funding. This year, money was renewed for seven months and agencies will have to rebid for the final five months.

Although the state funding year begins Sept. 1, the Ryan White fiscal year begins April 1.

“We appreciate that Dallas County corrected the error so quickly,” Pace said.

Even with lag time in receiving the additional funds, Pace said the meals program will continue uninterrupted, thanks to a recent $25,000 grant from the MAC Cosmetics AIDS fund.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition September 2, 2011.

—  Michael Stephens

Local briefs • 08.05.11

Continuing education credit available through Hope Cottage

Hope Cottage, Dallas’ oldest nonprofit, nonsectarian adoption agency, is now authorized to offer continuing education contact credits for social workers through its new Adoption 101 programming.

Director of Programs Brooks Quinlan, LMSW-AP, explained: “The goal of Infant Adoption 101 is to equip social service professionals with the skill sets needed to respond with confidence and sensitivity towards a client exploring or moving forward with an adoption plan.”

Upon completion of the program, participants are awarded one contact hour.

Thanks to donations, the program is offered free of charge. Organizations interested in receiving the training should contact Heather Hussong at by email at hhussong@hopecottage.org or by phone at 214-526-8721, ext. 241.

Mountain View College offers youth empowerment conference

“Keepin’ It Real!” a free one-day youth empowerment conference, is being offered Saturday, Aug. 13, from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at Mountain View College, 4849 W. Illinois Avenue in Dallas.

The conference is intended to provide teens with “real life” solutions to problems they face and in the process help build their self-confidence as they prepare to return to school.

Teens grades 6-12 can attend. Keynote speakers are Felix A. Zamora, president of Mountain View College and a motivational speaker and author; and Cheryl Jackson with Minnie’s Food Pantry and The Giving Movement.

All teens will participate in six interactive workshops which include bullycide, engineering the world, HIV/AIDS awareness and college financial aid and scholarships among others.

Musical entertainment will be provided by local artists including Rumill, Dacia Kings, Elliott Skinner accompanied by pianist, Dylan Cantu, Rachel Webb and P2 Mimes of Greater Mt. Calvary COGIC, and more.

Teens will also have an opportunity during a moderated panel discussion to meet local leaders and ask questions.

Also, Backpacking for Education returns for the eighth year. BFE is a program that supplies the attending youth with backpacks filled with school supplies. Additionally, some students will win door prizes and all will receive giveaways.

Registration is free but pre-registration is required by Aug. 10. To register for this conference or for more information, go online to TeenGraffiti.com or call 972-496-9457.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition August 5, 2011.

—  Michael Stephens

Happy Birthday, Donna Dumae!

Donna Dumae

Over the years Don Jenkins, through his drag alter ego Donna Dumae, has helped raise thousands of dollars for charitable causes — most notably HIV/AIDS services — in the Dallas/Fort Worth area.

This week, Don(na) turns 50 years old, and true to form, is using the occasion as yet another opportunity to raise money for a worthy cause.

Donna Dumae and Empress Anita Martini (who is also celebrating a birthday this week) are hosting the “Golden Oldies” fundraising show and birthday party on Sunday, June 19, at The Brick/Joe’s, 2525 Wycliff Ave. Cocktail hour starts at 6 p.m. and the show starts at 7 p.m. Proceeds benefit Resource Center Dallas’ Food Pantry, which helps feed people with HIV/AIDS.

Donna and Empress Anita are also inviting performers to join in. If you are interested in strutting your stuff for charity, get there by 6 to be part of the line-up. And if performing isn’t your strong point, then bring your wallet and show your appreciation for these folks who have been doing so much for so long to help others.

—  admin

Big D Bear Dance doles out $20K

I chatted up Mark Trimble earlier today, and he told me that Sunday night’s Big D Bear Dance at TMC: The Mining Company was quite the success. Trimble is one of the BDBD organizers. The night is not only an offshoot of the bigger TBRU event, but also raises money for local organizations, and Sunday night was all about Resource Center Dallas’ Food Pantry. Darren Graff, also with BDBD, took over some canned food donations and a check for $2,700. Whoa.

Last week, Trimble and I also chatted about the funds raised from the TBRU dance event. BDBD recently made their check presentation to the Dallas Bears, which in turn, will dole it out among several beneficiaries.

“We partner with [Dallas Bears] during TBRU for the joint purpose of raising money for the charities and throwing a kick-ass party,” Trimble said. “But we let them write the checks to the charities directly pooled with the money they raise from the rest of TBRU. I’m happy to be involved with people doing good and interesting stuff in the bear community. Somebody needs to toot our horns every once in a while!”

Below, the BDBD gents present their check for $18,000 to the Dallas Bears. Photos courtesy of Norman Ames.


—  Rich Lopez

Making a better world, one step at a time

John Boeglin

John Boeglin repays the help he gets as a client at AOC by also being a volunteer at the agency

TAMMYE NASH  |  Senior Editor

FORT WORTH — John Boeglin, first diagnosed with AIDS in 1989, has been a client of Tarrant County’s AIDS Outreach Center off and on since 1991.

But Boeglin doesn’t just go to the center for help for himself; he helps others in turn by volunteering at AOC. And he has taken his volunteerism a step forward by looking for — and finding — ways to help the agency go a little more green.

“I have volunteered in different parts of AIDS Outreach, and I had volunteered in the food pantry for about four years when I started thinking that there was a real need for us to start incorporating recycling into all of our events,” Boeglin said.

So he took the initiative of coordinating with the city to get recycle bins at the agency and has been leading AOC’s recycling efforts in the three years since then.

“It’s not very profitable. But at least we are helping the environment. We can now take all the cardboard and plastic and aluminum that comes through here and recycle it, instead of having it all end up in a landfill somewhere,” he said.

He added, “I have always been cautious about my own carbon footprint, about the impact I have on the environment. I was always riding a bicycle everywhere. I didn’t even have a car until my father passed away.”

Boeglin has also been a big supporter of AOC’s annual AIDS Walk, both as a walker and as a volunteer who helps set up on the day of the event, and then take everything down and put it away when it’s over.

“I’m usually there from the first thing in the morning until that night when it’s all done,” he said. “And I have walked in the AIDS Walk for at least 10 years now.”

Boeglin said he volunteers with and walks in the AIDS Walk, now in its 19th year, because “it helps earn money to pay for the services that we need. And with all the cuts the government has made since 2000, that money has become a real necessity.

“This agency probably wouldn’t make it without the money from the AIDS Walk,” he continued. “Because of all the changes made by the previous administration [under President George W. Bush], people can’t even get on disability now. A lot of people wouldn’t be able to make it without the programs at AIDS Outreach Center.”

Boeglin said he first started doing volunteer work “primarily because there wasn’t a lot else to do. Those of us who were diagnosed in the 1980s and early ’90s, we found out we were sick and so we started planning for the end of our lives. Then all of a sudden, we realized we weren’t dying.

“So we tried to go back to work, but we either couldn’t get jobs at all, or we couldn’t get jobs that would actually pay the bills,” he said. “So we found ourselves sitting around our apartments with nothing to do. That’s how it happened with me. So I started volunteering.”

Boeglin said he volunteered with the Healing Wings program at JPS Hospital and then later at AIDS Outreach when the program moved. He has also volunteered with Q Cinema and has been involved with Tarrant County Stonewall Democrats. He has been politically active as well, once getting a scholarship that allowed him to fly to Washington, D.C., to lobby Congress on behalf of the AIDS Drugs Assistance Program.

He said he has lobbied the Texas Legislature on HIV and LGBT related issues, too.

“Sometimes, you can get a little burned out when you stay in one place, doing one thing for too long. So I avoid the burnout by going from one place to another,” Boeglin said. “After I had volunteered at the food pantry [at AOC] for several years, it started to get really difficult. When you start losing so many people, it gets hard. You come in and even though you know they’re gone, you keep looking for them, keep waiting to see them. It’s hard.”

That was one reason, he said, that he chose to work with Q Cinema. “I needed to do things that let me see more people that are affected by HIV instead only seeing people who are infected with HIV. I needed that change of pace,” he explained.

Boeglin has a lot of hobbies, too, that help keep him busy and healthy. He is a writer and an artist and works in wood crafting. He also likes to attend Scarborough Faire and sci-fi conventions, and will be volunteering at an upcoming convention here in North Texas.

Boeglin said his interest in sci-fi conventions grew out of a fascination with science and with space that began when he was a child and sat with his grandfather to watch as Neil Armstrong became the first man to walk on the moon.

“Did you know that it was protease inhibitors developed during experiments on the space shuttle that led to the use of the ‘drug cocktails’ in the 1995 that have helped people with AIDS live better and longer?” Boeglin asks. “They were able to grow these protein crystals large enough in space with zero gravity to be able to see how they would affect how HIV is able to enter cells. And millions of us are alive today because of those experiments they did on the space shuttle in 1995.”

While some people may joke about the sci fi convention fans and the separate world they sometimes seem to live in, Boeglin sees a kind of nobility in that world that gives him hope for a better future in this one.

“The conventions and the fans, there’s a very, very good sense of community there, just like there is here at AIDS Outreach,” Boeglin said. “It makes me believe that someday that altruistic future [of the sci-fi world] may really someday come true, because people care enough to be here, to be at the AIDS Walk and participate in it — the ones who don’t have to be there, but are there anyway, and the ones who struggle to be there and make a difference. It gives me hope.”

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition April 1, 2011.

—  John Wright

2011 Readers Voice Awards: Ultimate Diva!



MONEY CHANGES EVERYTHING Ultimate Diva! winner Stacy McKinney accepts the donation made to her favorite non-profit from Dallas Voice Promotions Manager Terry Thompson.

You go, girl!

In spectacular fashion, a straight woman surrounded by gay men wins the Ultimate Diva! contest. And it’s not just the photo of Stacy McKinney — it’s how she lives her life

When Stacy McKinney entered a photo competition with the goal to be named Dallas Voice’s Ultimate Diva!, she encircled herself with hot gay men. It was more than a photo — it is a metaphor for her life. McKinney joined DIVA (the Dallas Independent Volleyball Association) not knowing it was a gay league but stuck around even after she found out. She’s been a tireless cheerleader for the group, donating her $1,000 winnings to it. Such a diva thing to do.

Dallas Voice: How do we know you? McKinney: I thought everyone knew me!

OK, for those of us who might not, what’s your involvement in the LGBT community? I got involved with DIVA and found that our Miss DIVA Pageant donates all the money to the Food Pantry. It went from there. I put my name on the volunteer list at the Resource Center Dallas. I started volunteering for GayBingo. Also, DIVA has given back to the city of Dallas recreation centers for the past 21 years. DIVA just hosted their bachelor auction and raised $5,000 for the pet charity, Mazie’s Mission.

How did you end up in the community? I went to try out for DIVA and ended up in the Competitive Division. When the vice president of memberships, Brian Borski, was thanking everyone and saying their main goal is to provide a social outlet to the gay and lesbian community, all the blood rushed out of my body. I freaked. When we were done I ran to the registration table and said, “Oh my gosh, is it OK if I am straight?” They were like, “Girl we knew you were as soon as you hit the door.” That was four years ago.

So what does DIVA mean to you? DIVA is a social volleyball sports organization but has also always given back to our LGBT community from its very beginning. We hold various fundraisers that benefit a local LGBT charity with the proceeds raised.

Is this Ultimate Diva! title going to make you just impossible to be around? Well, I already have a title within the organization as “First Lady of DIVA.” This is just the cherry on top.

When do you take off the tiara? I only take it off a few times a day — when I swim and when I am playing volleyball. But I do wear it to the court.

OK, are you really just a fruit fly? Yes, as it should be. I really don’t like straight people.

Will you ever surrender the title of Ultimate Diva!? Sure. I am always up for a good fight!

Apparently straight women can be ultimate divas: Don’t be jealous, I was born this way!

OK, Gaga.


This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition March 18, 2011.

—  John Wright

Death: Stan Wisniewski

Stan Wisniewski, 51, of Dallas, died just prior to Thanksgiving 2010. A native of Pennsylvania and Ohio, he had lived in Dallas since 1985 and worked as a courier, clerked at Honda Mechanics and Sales, and warehoused at MJ Designs, finally settling into a seven-year career at Walgreen’s. Wisniewski was a generous giver who volunteered at Resource Center Dallas and at the center’s food pantry. He had a friendly and happy-go-lucky demeanor that brought him many friends who will miss him sorely.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition Feb. 18, 2011.

—  John Wright

CCGLA launches partnership with Health Services of North Texas, donates 160 pounds of food

CCGLA members Kathy Scalise, from left, Jeanne Rubin, Jane Schmidt and Morris Garcia volunteer at HSNT.

By Jeanne S. Rubin

PLANO — Each year at the Collin County Gay & Lesbian Alliance Annual Holiday Party, CCGLA members collect for various charities. This year the board decided to focus on one longtime partner, Health Services of North Texas and develop a more meaningful relationship between the two organizations. After consulting Plano nutrition center employee Diana DeLashaw, members were encouraged to donate macaroni and cheese and Hamburger Helper, popular items that are hard to keep on the food pantry shelves.

Volunteers delivered more than 160 pounds of food to HSNT and worked with DeLashaw to weigh, check dates, take inventory and stock shelves. I took the opportunity to meet with DeLashaw about further volunteer opportunities for CCGLA members and plans for a second food drive. In addition, HSNT Director of Development Leslie Runic-Boysen and CCGLA President Morris Garcia spoke about common goals and a desire to work together in the future.

“I only had a short window to help out because I had to pick up my granddaughter,” explained CCGLA member Kathy Scalise, “but I am really glad I made the time. This experience made the donation more more meaningful. I encourage other members to give a few hours of their time. You will definitely get more than you give.”

The mission of HSNT is improving the quality of life of underserved North Texans through medical care, support services and advocacy. For more info, go to www.healthntx.org. The mission of CCGLA is advocating equality, dignity and respect through education, political awareness and social interaction. For more info, go to www.ccgla.org.

Jeanne S. Rubin serves on the board of the Collin County Gay & Lesbian Alliance.

—  admin

Leather Knights begin another year of fundraising with a New Year’s party, and you’re invited

Jason Kloss

On Monday night, Leather Knights distributed checks from several events held during the year to AIDS Services of Dallas, Resource Center Dallas, Youth First Texas and AIDS Interfaith Network.

Jason Kloss, president of Leather Knights, said he’s having a New Year’s party and asked us to help him invite the community.

“All I am asking of my guests is to consider bringing a donation to benefit either the Food Pantry or AIDS Services Dallas-Hillcrest House,” he said. “They prefer daily hygiene products (toothpaste, soap, toilet paper, razors, deodorant) or non-perishable food items (canned goods, pasta, condiments).”

Kloss said the party will feature an open bar and any tips to the volunteer bartenders will benefit AIN. Any other donations will also go to the beneficiaries.

The party starts at 9 p.m. on Dec. 31. E-mail Jason for directions.

—  David Taffet