Events to benefit Legacy Counseling

Angels battle devils in kickball game; Be An Angel brings Christmas in September

HEAVENLY DEMONS | DFW Sisters Kerianna Kross, left, and MaeLyn Hanzment have a heavenly plan to cheat their way to victory against Dallas Diablos Todd Hopkins, center, David Whitehead and Molly Whitman.

DAVID TAFFET  |  Staff Writer
taffet@dallasvoice.com

Two fundraising events this week benefit Legacy Counseling Center: The DFW Sisters have challenged the Dallas Diablos rugby team to a Sunday game of kickball. Then on Tuesday, Be An Angel takes place in Deep Ellum.

What do the rough-and-tumble Diablos and the ever-so-spiritual Sisters have in common? The Diablos, who play one of the roughest team sports, compete in the not-gay Texas Rugby Union and participate in the International Gay Rugby Association. Part of their mission is to forge friendships and celebrate differences.

And nothing in Dallas could be more different than The DFW Sisters, a mission of the Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence. But that group is also dedicated to respecting diversity. And both groups include fundraising for community organizations as part of their core mission.

So what else could the Diablos do but accept the challenge when The Sisters invited them to play a game of kickball for charity?

“What a fun and zany way to raise money for Legacy,” said Legacy Executive Director Melissa Grove. “I applaud their ability to create a new and fresh event. I’ve been doing this a long time and this is the first time I’ve seen anything like this.”

James Maggard, also known as Sister MaeLynn Hanzment, acknowledged a possible physical advantage that favored the Diablos.

“The only way we’re going to win is if we cheat,” he said. “So we’re fully intending to do that.”

But there are rules — established kickball rules. And kickball is actually played in Dallas with official referees keeping things honest. If one of those referees is on hand, as Maggard hopes, he may just have his hands full.

That would just add to the fun, Maggard said, fully intending to get around any attempt to keep the game honest.

An attendance fee of $5 is requested to watch the game. Additional donations will buy wild cards. Bigger donations may help one team or the other.

“Wild cards can add points, score outs, replace the ball or turn a Diablo into a Sister,” Maggard said. For a larger donation, a Diablo will switch teams and play for the Sisters in full makeup. Maggard admitted that the makeup would be a rush job.

Dallas Diablo Paul Ryan said the idea for the event came from friends in Seattle where the Seattle Quake rugby team played the Seattle Sisters in a game of kickball and raised several thousand dollars.

He expects to have a good showing from both the men’s and women’s Diablo teams.

And if The Sisters do cheat, Ryan had a perfect solution: “We’ll cheat ourselves,” he said.

The game takes place at Glencoe Park between Ellsworth and Martel avenues near Central Expressway and Mockingbird Lane.

A victory party at the Hidden Door follows the game. Victory? Both teams figure they’ve won if they raise some money for Legacy

Be An Angel

On Tuesday, Sept. 13, the 17th annual Be An Angel auction returns to Monica’s Aca y Alla on Main Street in Deep Ellum. The evening features dinner, a live and silent auction and music by Vince Martinez.

Jazzy baritone Martinez was a regular performer at Ciudad on Oak Lawn Avenue and has since performed around the United States.

Clear Channel Radio Public Affairs Director Anna De Haro hosts the event.

Be An Angel began in 1994 just before Christmas with an auction. Although moved to earlier in the year this time, the evening will still have a holiday theme.
Among the auction items this year are a signed guitar from Rascal Flatts, a dinner party for 10 prepared by celebrity chef Joanne Bondy and a cocktail party for 20 from Hudson Ferus Vodka and Bar10.

Grove said the event is a great way to get some Christmas shopping done early while helping out a good cause at the same time.

Kickball at Field No. 1, Glencoe Park, 5300 Martel Ave. Sept. 11 at 2 p.m. $5.

Be An Angel at Monica’s Aca y Alla, 2914 Main St. Sept. 13 at 7 p.m. $40.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition September 9, 2011.

—  Michael Stephens

CSMA announces new event schedule for 2011

First Wednesday events are ending, but Whittall says quarterly Wine Walks, other regular events will make up the difference

JEFFERSON JOHNSON  |  Staff Writer
intern@dallasvoice.com

Although Cedar Springs Merchant Association is ending its monthly First Wednesday parties, CSMA President Scott Whittall, co-owner of Buli, said this week a calendar of quarterly Wine Walks and monthly events have taken effect.

“We changed our First Wednesday event to a quarterly event for 2011,” Whittall said about one of the first obvious changes taking effect this year.

First Wednesday now will be replaced with a quarterly Wine Walk, he explained. “The wine walks are always a really good turnout and people like the concept.”

Every wine walk will feature a new $5 commemorative glass for guests to take into participating stores to mingle, browse and shop, with the wine offered compliments of the individual stores.

Whittall says it’s also a great way for customers to meet and greet the owners.

By selling commemorative glasses, CSMA hopes to make some money back, which accounts for the cost of the glasses. Proceeds will also help fund future events, plus the glasses will give wine walks a sense of occasion, he said.

Whittall said that even though the Cedar Springs Arts Festivals in both 2009 and 2010 failed to reach their fundraising goals, the spring festival will return this year.

This time, Whittall said, organizers know what pitfalls to watch for, what to do and what not to do.

“We hope to have more than 100 artists and vendors,” Whittall said, compared to last year’s 70 or so.
Whittall said CSMA is known for its interesting fundraising events, like underwear auctions, and for throwing a great street party.

“We’re always racking our brains to come up with some new and exciting fundraisers,” like the Super Street Party the association is holding on Cedar Springs during Super Bowl weekend next month.

The Super Party, sponsored by Bud Light, is one of the larger events CSMA has planed, Whittall said. He said it will be similar to the annual Pride parade, but with a football twist.

Whittall also stressed that the event is not affiliated with the National Football League in any way, but that he hopes it will draw out-of-towners to the area and help spotlight Cedar Springs.

The purpose of all the CSMA events, Whittall said, is to have fun while raising funds to benefit and help beautify the gayborhood.

The bars and merchants along the Cedar Springs strip are faring well, Whittall said. But, he added, “Cedar Springs is not immune to the economic climate.

Whittall said that times have changed over the last 30 years and that Cedar Springs needs the support of the community to survive and thrive. The more support they get, the more money will be available for events and projects.

“Unfortunately, money is everything,” said Whittall.  “It’s hard to go out and raise funds.”

He said CSMA’s solution is to give donors something — like a wine walk or an arts festival — in return, as opposed to simply asking for a donation. More importantly, he added, donations to CSMA come back to the community in several forms.

CSMA uses funds collected to build streetlights for more safety, to improve signage and sidewalks, among other planned improvements, he said.

“The big message here is support,” said Whittall. “It’s the heart of the gay community of Dallas, and we are dedicated to keeping it just that.

“Everybody here is committed to seeing Cedar Springs be here another 30 years,” Whittall concluded. “But we need help. We need everybody’s support to make sure that does happen.”

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition Jan. 21, 2001.

—  John Wright

Legacy holds 2 fundraising events in December

Leslie Jordan

On Sunday, Dec. 12, the annual Christmas Stocking Auction benefiting Legacy Counseling Center takes place at the Round-Up Saloon.

Executive Director Melissa Grove said there are always great prices for a variety of Christmas gift items included in the stockings.

Doors open at 5 p.m., and the auction begins at 6 p.m. On Saturday night, preview the stockings in the Parlor. Items include restaurant gift certificates, sports tickets, electronics, hotel packages and more.

Then on Thursday, Dec. 30 at 7 p.m., Leslie Jordan presents his “Church Revival” also benefiting Legacy.

The revival takes place at the Sara Ellen & Samuel Weisfeld Center in downtown Dallas. Tickets are $100, but follow this link and get a 60 percent discount.

Grove said sponsor tickets are still available. Sponsors will enjoy a covered-dish, old-fashioned, church dinner with Jordan.

Legacy Counseling Center provides affordable, quality mental health care and emotional support services to men and women challenged with HIV or AIDS with individual, group and family counseling by licensed professionals. They also operate Legacy Founders Cottage, a seven-room special-care facility in Oak Cliff.

So why weren’t these events in this week’s paper? We’ll just blame Melissa for forgetting to tell us.

—  David Taffet

Minehart announces departure from Lone Star Ride

Dave Minehart

Dave Minehart announced he will leave the Lone Star Ride. He has participated in the ride for all 10 years of its existence, the first seven as a volunteer and the last three as event manager.

He has accepted a new position as development director for a nonprofit organization in his hometown, Iowa City, Iowa. He has been in Texas for the past 28 years but over the past seven, his goal has been to move closer to family.

“I’m leaving you in very, very capable hands,” Minehart said.

Laura Kerr is the incoming board chair. Co-chairs of the ride are John Tripp and Danny Simpson. Tripp co-chaired the ride this year and Simpson has been responsible for fundraising events outside the ride and participated in it for a number of years.

Minehart said he hopes to be at Lone Star Ride next year, depending on his schedule with his new job.

“Lone Star Ride is on a role and it’s going to keep going,” he said. “I hold extreme affection for the event, the people involved and the beneficiaries.”

His last day at Lone Star Ride is Dec. 27 and he begins his new job on Jan. 5.

—  David Taffet

Americans to Pakistan: Drown

There’s little LGBT about this. I’m writing it because I haven’t seen anyone else in the media say it. It’s not my recommendation. It’s my observation.

Americans don’t sit by when people are in desperate need. The LGBT community doesn’t just let others suffer. Or so it seems, until now.

The LGBT community locally and nationally is usually very responsive to crises. We got little help with the AIDS crisis but have taken the lead in helping others affected by the disease.

When the earthquake hit Haiti, fundraising events spontaneously popped up all over the U.S. What had Haiti ever done for us? Nothing. They’re the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere and needed our help. Most of us gave and felt guilty for not giving more.

The LGBT community in Dallas got together and produced an eight-hour fundraising event with performers from within and from outside our community to raise money for Haitians. Thousands of dollars were sent to the Clinton-Bush Haiti fund. The only wish in the community was that we could have done more.

When the tsunami swept the Pacific, donations poured in to help a dozen or more poor countries recover. Some of those countries were allies. Others, not so much. But desperate people needed our help.

Dallas Voice reported at the time that Cathedral of Hope and White Rock Community Church joined forces and raised more than $20,000 for that relief effort.

Today, floods have displaced 8.5 million people in Pakistan. As the crisis continues, homes have been destroyed and people are consumed by illness and hunger. The reaction is quite different.

—  David Taffet