Attendance swells at Pride across U.S., including Houston, San Antonio

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Organizers said the San Antonio Pride Parade was the biggest in its 10-year history. More than 400,000 turned out for Houston Pride.

The Pride Bigger than Texas festival in San Antonio attracted about 5,000 people. That was followed by the parade on Main Avenue with more than 15,000 lining the street.

The large crowds for Pride parades around the country celebrated the Prop 8 and Defense of Marriage Act victories in the Supreme Court last week.

In New York, home of the first Pride parade 44 years ago, 2 million people typically turn out for the event. This year, the city estimated 3 million celebrated in the wake of the victories. Edie Windsor, plaintiff in the case that struck down DOMA, was grand marshal.

“I love it obviously,” she said. “If someone had told me 50 years ago that I would be the marshal of New York City gay Pride parade in 2013 at the age of 84, I never would have believed it.”

In California, same-sex marriage resumed on Friday. Later, Justice Anthony Kennedy, who wrote the DOMA opinion, turned down a request by the plaintiffs in the Prop 8 case to delay the beginning of marriage equality while they file a petition for rehearing by the high court.

San Francisco’s Pride parade, which usually draws 1 million, attracted a few hundred thousand more participants this year.

Among those participating in the parade were House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi, Milk screenwriter Dustin Lance Black and Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg.

Marriage equality passed in Delaware earlier this year and the state began issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples today.

—  David Taffet

Blonde ambition

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Dolly Parton keeps on truckin’ with a new album, a tour — and late-night trips to the Kroger in full Dolly drag

Dolly Parton, the “Queen of Country Music,” reigns on our (gay) parade with her new album Better Day and her concert tour, at the Verizon Theatre Tuesday. Better Day marks her 41st solo album of original material, and she ties Reba McEntire with four No. 1 country singles in four consecutive decades. Parton is far more than a country music star. Even calling her “iconic” seems too small for the larger-than-life persona.
From her humble roots in Tennessee, our “Backwoods Barbie” continues to be a doll to her gay fans. With some rare moments to spare, she talks behind the scenes of her tour and what’s beneath the makeup and glitter.

— Jerry Nunn

Dallas Voice: The first track on Better Day, “In the Mean Time,” is so feisty. What was your motivation for it? Parton: That is one my favorite songs because it sums up what is going on in the world, my attitude about it. Everybody is so down in the dumps and waiting for the end of time instead of doing something about it, enjoying the time they got. This whole album I wanted to write stuff to uplift people and give a positive spin on this negativity.

You’ve performed the first single, “Together You and I” on television, but is there a video in the works? Yes. Trey Fanjoy, who was director of the year at CMT this year, did a wonderful video that shows people from all over the world, love in all forms and fashions — more of a universal love. It is a beautiful video.

What can fans expect from your concerts now? We got all sorts of good things going with the Better Day World Tour. We have a lot of positive stuff in that by doing different things for the fans.

You have a huge gay following and they will always love you. Hey, a big shout out to them! We have fun with my gay crowds. We are going to be in L.A. for two days at the Hollywood Bowl, then in San Francisco. All ready so many of my gay fans have said they are going to be there in the front row. I love it. I have always loved my gay fans. They accept me and I accept them. We get along just fine. I am very proud and honored when they dress up like me or whatever they want to do!

What is your favorite thing about touring? People, the audience, I love that. I love to travel because I am a gypsy, but I enjoy performing for the fans that love to see it. I have been around so many years, worked so many audiences and had so many types of shows. Since the beginning, it is kind of fun to watch how things have changed. I have fans from little bitty kids now watching Hannah Montana with Aunt Dolly to my older fans and the new ones that have discovered my music. It is a really fun trip for me as you can imagine.

How fabulous is your tour bus? The set up is great. I have traveled on a tour bus since 1967. This current one is an updated, modern version, where there is room. Especially when it has stopped you can let the sides out and have a real home. I don’t stay in hotels so I just live on my bus. I’ve got everything from my kitchen to my televisions, DVDs and books. It’s a way to carry my wigs and my costumes. I am set up good for that.

Are you able to take off the wig and shop at Kroger without people recognizing you? Well, if I went to Kroger I wouldn’t take off my wig. I don’t go grocery shopping too much but when I do it’s usually in the wee hours after midnight. If I really want to cook certain things for a special occasion that I really need and I don’t trust anyone to find it I will go to the store. But I usually dress like myself and go in. I can’t be disguised because if I open my mouth you know it’s me! I sound as different as I look. There is no point in going and embarrassing myself by looking like hell.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition July 15, 2011.

—  Kevin Thomas

Angela Hunt says her separate entry in Sunday’s gay Pride parade was ‘not a political statement’

For Angela Hunt, it’s times like these that owning a convertible comes in handy.

Some may be wondering — as we were — why Dallas City Councilwoman Angela Hunt had a separate entry in Sunday’s gay Pride parade instead of riding on the city of Dallas float with other councilmembers. Hunt’s separate entry prompted at least one local gay Republican to post a photo of the city float on his Facebook page and suggest that Hunt, whose district includes half of Oak Lawn, had missed the parade. That’s not true, of course. Hunt’s entry — consisting of her car, her husband and herself — came near the end of the procession.

Our first thought, to be honest, was whether this was an indication that Hunt plans to run for mayor next year. We thought maybe she was trying to show up current Mayor Tom Leppert, who was absent from Pride for the second time in four years. But it turns out Hunt’s separate parade entry wasn’t at all politically motivated, or even intentional.

Hunt explained to Instant Tea Tuesday morning that she missed the shuttle that takes councilmembers from Lee Park to the parade lineup. She was told initially that the shuttle would be returning for her, but it never did, and the parade start time of 2 o’clock had come and gone. Hunt said she and her husband began to panic. They quickly jumped in their car and hit the car wash (she says her husband insited that they couldn’t take the car in the gay parade without washing it). They then made a quick visit to CVS to pick up some poster board, magic markers and streamers. Hunt called parade organizer Michael Doughman and explained that she would be cutting him a check for the $250 entry fee.

“It was great fun but slightly stressful,” Hunt said. “I couldn’t miss the parade. My husband and I have been in it for five years, and we were determined not to miss the parade. It’s not a political statement, and I hated not getting to ride with my colleagues.”

—  John Wright