Letters • 11.19.10

Fox not a credible news source

I read with interest the column written last week by Matthew Tsien (“Gay vote for GOP shows change in trend,” Dallas Voice, Nov. 12), formerly public affairs director for the Washington, D.C., chapter of Log Cabin Republicans.

I find the statements made by Mr. Tsien to be somewhat incredulous, however. He stated that 31 percent or more of self-identified gay voters voted Republican in 2010. Later he suggests that this is probably 5 to 10 percent higher, which would mean that almost half of the GLBT voters in this election cast Republican ballots.

Before we can ascertain whether or not this is an accurate number, we must “consider the source” of the data. My mother taught me a long time ago to always “consider the source” whenever you hear information or are presented with data.

Well when we look into Mr. Tsien’s source of information, we find that it is none other than Fox News, a notoriously biased network that is owned by conservative billionaire Rupert Murdoch, who also owns and controls the Wall Street Journal.

This American does not consider Fox News to be a credible news source. Fox News is what I refer to as “infotainment.” They inflame, exaggerate and basically present blatantly false information to their viewers on a regular basis. How can anyone cite this news source as being “credible?”

In all fairness, Mr. Tsien does disclose his source at the beginning of his column —  “According to Fox News….” — which puts his whole article in context to the truly discerning reader.

I recognize that there are gay conservatives, but long-studied electoral statistics have said that the only demographic group that is more loyal to the Democratic Party than the GLBT community is the African-American community.

Those numbers typically run around 85 percent.

So it is much more likely that about 15 percent of GLBT voters — or one out of seven — cast a GOP ballot.

Further, there are legitimate, credible and objective conservative sources of information, like The Economist of London. Fox News, or as we on the Left call it, Faux News is not one of them.

I agree that Democrats aren’t doing enough to advance GLBT civil rights.

But to suggest that the GOP will do so is truly preposterous.

Mom is right: “Consider the Source.”

Jay Narey
Outgoing vice president of Stonewall Democrats of Dallas

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‘A little suspect’

Does anyone else find it a little suspect that Matthew Tsien, when claiming that 31 percent or more of self-identified gay voters said in exit poles that they voted for the Republican Party, cited Fox News as his source (“Gay vote for GOP shows change in trend,” Dallas Voice, Nov. 12)?

Just sayin’.

Mikael Andrews
Dallas

……………..

Dems top GOP in money matters

There are many ways to measure the superiority of the Democratic Party over the GOP. Look at one that affects nearly everyone: Money.
During the Bush years, the Dow Jones went from about 11,000 to about 8,000 when he left office.

This decline of more than 27 percent proves the fiscal irresponsibility of the Republican Party. Bush left the nation in the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression.

Enter Obama and the Democrats: Dow goes from about 8,000 to over 11,000, an increase of more than 37 percent in less than two years, indicating fiscal responsibility seen by corporations and investors alike. Bush recession ends.

Don’t be fooled by GOP protestations. They have proven inept at governing.

David A. Gershner
Dallas

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition November 19, 2010.

—  Michael Stephens

Gay vote for GOP shows change in trend

Exit polls shows 1-in-3 voters who self-identified as gay voted Republican. Do we no longer see GOP as automatically anti-gay?

Matthew Tsien | Special Contributor

We learned a lot about gay voters in this last election — at least, you did if you have an open mind and a discerning intellect.

According to Fox News, which some gays do watch, 31 percent or more of self-identified gay voters in exit polls said they voted for the Republican Party. That is one in three gay voters, and more than the normal GOP base in the gay community of one in four.

That means a considerable number of gay Democrats and independents defected to the party opposing Obama/Pelosi.

Most gays will be shocked that gay people voted for what is supposed to be a party of rampant, uncontrollable, domineering, hyper-extreme homophobia. Well, at least that’s what most gays who live in a gay bubble all their intellectual and social lives would think.

Actually the number of gay people who voted for the GOP might even be 5-to-10 percent higher, since not every gay is inclined to self-identify as gay in an exit poll.

These numbers do tell us something very profound and unshakable about the gay political psyche, and it is not about self-loathing and being in the closet.
Instead, gay voters going to the GOP is strong indication that many gays no longer believe that the world — or even the GOP — is nearly as homophobic as the gay press and political class make it out to be.

Simply put, many gays have walked away from the once-popular notion of homophobia dominating the world according to the gay journalism universe. And they’re tired of being called “nut jobs” and in need of psychiatric help if they don’t vote Democratic or for more government.

Furthermore, many — approximately 30-to-40 percent embrace the Republican position of less taxes, less government, less bailouts, less deficits, less massive foreign borrowing, less Obamamania — and more freedom to run your own life, even the freedom to fail.

Gays know that HIV funding does not disappear with a GOP Congress. They also know that job protection does not evaporate if Republicans take over the government. And many gays just are not interested in marriage since it is set up for heterosexuals with all the potential traumatic divorce laws and financial devastation that accompanies traditional marriage. The trap of marriage equality is simply not a first and foremost concern to many thoughtful gay people.
Gay people were very involved with the Tea Party, phone bank operations and a multitude of effective get-out-the-vote efforts to help the Republicans win a historical election and deliver a massive repudiation of the extreme elements that have defined the first two years of Obama.

And that’s a fact worth noting.

Matthew Tsien is the former public affairs director for the Washington, D.C. chapter of Log Cabin Republicans and a graduate of the National Journalism Center.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition November 12, 2010.

—  Michael Stephens

Getting out the vote

Stonewall VP Jay Narey, above, and Political Director Omar Narvaez, below, are hoping for a monumental upset in the governor’s race.

In what’s become an Election Day ritual, more than a dozen members of Stonewall Democrats of Dallas gathered around the Legacy of Love Monument during the Tuesday morning rush hour for a last minute get-out-the-vote effort.

Asked about her predictions for today, Stonewall President Erin Moore said, “Like any election, we’ll win some and we’ll lose some.”

She added that she thinks Democrats will continue their dominance in Dallas County, but she said she’s worried about some of the local state House races.

Asked about Democrat Bill White’s chances of unseating Gov. Rick Perry, Moore just shook her head. “But don’t quote me on that,” she said.

Poll are open until 7 p.m. today. For a list of precinct locations, go here.

—  John Wright

Bill White says LGBT vote ‘absolutely critical’

Democratic challenger says he expects ‘a very close election’ as he works to unseat incumbent Perry

John Wright  | Dallas Voice wright@dallasvoice.com

OPPOSITE SIDES  |  Democrat Bill White, above, has courted LGBT votes in his bid for Texas governor, including making appearances at the Stonewall Democrats of Dallas meetings (above). Republican Gov. Rick Perry (below) has courted anti-gay conservatives, suggesting that same-sex marriage hurts job growth.
OPPOSITE SIDES | Democrat Bill White, above, has courted LGBT votes in his bid for Texas governor, including making appearances at the Stonewall Democrats of Dallas meetings (above). Republican Gov. Rick Perry (below) has courted anti-gay conservatives, suggesting that same-sex marriage hurts job growth.

A strong turnout from LGBT voters is “absolutely critical” to his chances of unseating Republican Gov. Rick Perry on Tuesday, Nov. 2, Democrat Bill White told Dallas Voice this week.

In an exclusive interview, White said he expects “a very close election” and that gay voters in Texas shouldn’t stay away from the polls because they may be frustrated with a perceived lack of progress on LGBT issues in Washington.

White declined a request for a phone interview but agreed to answer questions via e-mail.

“It’s absolutely critical. This will be a very close election,” White said when asked about the importance of the gay vote. “I’m proud of my support in the community and so grateful to all the volunteers who have been raising funds, making phone calls, and knocking on doors to spread the word about the choice we have for the future of our state. This is no time to stay home. Whatever is going on nationally, we have major issues facing our state and need a leader to take them on.”

White, the former Houston mayor, is widely considered a strong LGBT ally, and he appeared in Dallas’ gay Pride parade in September.

White had a gay brother who died several years ago and has said he voted against Texas’ 2005 constitutional amendment banning same-sex marriage, which was championed by Perry.

However, White hasn’t made LGBT issues a major part of his gubernatorial campaign, presumably in part because they might be used by Perry to energize right-wing voters.

Some Democrats seeking statewide office, including Barbara Ann Radnofsky and Hank Gilbert, have published policy statements in support of LGBT equality on their websites.

“Actions speak louder than words, and I have a track record of inclusive leadership,” White said in response to a question about why he hasn’t focused on LGBT issues. “That’s why I’ve received a rare endorsement from the Human Rights Campaign. Rick Perry wants to divide Texans — it’s what we’ve seen from him for decades. He’d rather divide for his personal political purposes than bring people together to get things done. Major corporations in our state, like Shell Oil for example, know that being inclusive makes them more competitive. But Perry recently made some comment saying that Texas’ job growth was somehow tied to the constitutional amendment banning gay marriage. What? It just shows you how clueless a professional politician is.”

White was referring to Perry’s comment during a campaign stop in Temple in August, when the incumbent said: “There is still a land of opportunity, friends — it’s called Texas. We’re creating more jobs than any other state in the nation. … Would you rather live in a state like this, or in a state where a man can marry a man?”

Dallas Voice also asked White whether, as governor, he would support or sign bullying legislation that provides specific protections for students based on sexual orientation and gender identity in Texas public schools.

Asher Brown, a gay 13-year-old from the Houston suburbs, committed suicide in September after his parents say he was bullied relentlessly at school. Asher’s suicide was one of several across the country in recent months by teens who were gay or perceived to be gay.

“Asher Brown’s suicide is a heartbreaking tragedy,” White responded. “I’ll support policies that prohibit school and workplace discrimination and harassment of any kind, and I’ll work hard to build an atmosphere of respect in Texas.”

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition October 29, 2010

—  Kevin Thomas