New community center opens on Saturday

IMG_8224This is the picture I wanted to use for this week’s cover: Cece jumping for joy over the completion of the new community center.

We chose a different picture because either we lost her jumping or we lost the building. The picture is oblong and the paper is more square. And Cece didn’t want her stomach showing on thousands of copies of the paper distributed across the area.

One thing I didn’t get into the story is the donation wall, just inside the front door. Everyone who contributes to help pay off the remaining $344,000 will get their names on the donation wall. Cox said that they thought of cutting off the list at $100 or $250 or more, but this is a community center, built by the community and every donation is important. So she decided every name of every person (or company or foundation) that contributes belongs there.

Open house is Saturday, May 21 from 10 a.m.-noon. Stonewall Democrats holds a fundraiser and open house on Monday, May 23 from 7-9 p.m. Community groups are encouraged to use the facility. Contact the community center (the number’s the same: 214-528-0144) to reserve space.

Here are some more pictures of the new center:

—  David Taffet

Fanning confirmed as Army Secretary

fanning.eric

Army Secretary Eric Fanning

The U.S. Senate HAS confirmed Eric Fanning as Secretary of the Army. He becomes the first openly gay head of a branch of the U.S. military.

The appointment comes five years after the repeal of Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.

Fanning served two years as undersecretary of the Air Force and a half year as acting secretary of the Air Force.

President Barack Obama nominated Fanning to be Army Secretary eight months ago, but Sen. Pat Roberts (R-Kans.) has held up confirmation over a dispute with the administration over transferring Guantanamo prisoners to Leavenworth, Kansas.

The Army is the largest branch of the U.S. military with about 470,000 active troops.

—  David Taffet

Looking for Mr. Right? Company casting for gay dating show

Screen shot 2016-05-09 at 11.38.28 AMThe Casting Firm is looking for gay men who are “charismatic, handsome and genuinely looking for love” for a new gay dating show to be produced by Brian Graden Media and “set to air on a major cable network.” The show will feature a “modern dating format” and “fabulous single gay men.”

All applicants must be at least 21 years old and a legal resident of the U.S.

To suggest an eligible gay man or to nominate yourself for the show, visit theCastingFirm.com/GayDatingShow. For information email CastMe@theCastingFirm.com.

—  Tammye Nash

The Gay Pride Dildo is really, really gay. And a dildo

You know the philosophy that you don’t know you want something until someone invents it? Well that’s how I feel about the Pride Dildo. Sure, we’re gay, so we all have a huge collection of realistic, skin-toned dildos. But those are for pussies. (Well, they can be.) How does a pinkish or brown dildo really let your sex partner know you’re absolutely, unabashedly gay, and not just some fly-by-night (gulp!) “bi-curious” wannabe? A Pride Dildo, that’s how!

Offered in both Long Dong and Thick Rick styles (both on sale for under $50), these rainbow-striped silicon penis replicas say, “I’m here, I’m queer, get lubed to it!” Best of all? … this is not an April Fool’s joke.  Order it here. If you dare.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Couples needed for wedding apparel fashion show

920x920Dallas Voice is looking for LGBT couples to model wedding attire at our upcoming Wedding Party and Expo. The event, the second that Dallas Voice has hosted since the Supreme Court’s marriage equality decision last June 26, will be held March 20.

Mark Stinson-Stokes, the Voice’s conference and events director, said he is looking for “a diverse group of couples/models” to “represent the beauty of the DFW LGBT community.” “Couples” are not required to actually be in a relationship to model as a couple in the fashion show. There is no compensation, other than paid parking and the chance to be a wedding fashion model.

Couples will be interviewed Saturday, Feb. 20, at the Dallas Voice offices, 1825 Market Center Blvd., Ste. 240 (that’s in the Chase Bank building at the corner of Market Center and Turtle Creek Boulevard, in the Design District.). No reservations or booking are required.

A small panel of people will participate in the interviews to choose four lesbian couples and four gay couples for the Wedding Party and Expo, set for noon-4 p.m. on March 20 at the Renaissance Dallas Hotel.

Those who are chosen to participate as models will be notified within 48 hours.

Anyone with question can contact Stinson by email at expo@dallasvoice.com.

—  Tammye Nash

Get ready to cha cha into the weekend with Ab Soto

Ab SotoIt’s Thursday, and that means that tomorrow is Friday and Friday is when the weekend starts!

And in the words of electro rap singer Ab Soto, that means it’s time to “Cha Cha, Bitch”!

 

 

—  Tammye Nash

Under the Covers of Gay History: A talk with journalists/authors/ activists Tracy Baim and Mark Segal

On Thursday, Nov. 5, Dallas Voice had the great privilege of partnering with Cathedral of Hope’s Sources bookstore and with The Dallas Way to host a book-signing and discussion with authors/journalists/activists Tracy Baim and Mark Segal.

Baim, co-founder, publisher and executive editor of Chicago’s LGBT newspaper Windy City News, has recently published  Barbara Gittings: Gay Pioneer, a biography — complete with more than 200 photos — of LGBT pioneer activist Barbara Gittings. Mark Segal, founder, owner and publisher of the Philadelphia Gay News, whose life as a gay rights activist started on June 29, 1969 at the Stonewall Inn. He has recently published his memoir, And Then I Danced: Traveling the Road to LGBT Equality.

Below is a video, courtesy of David Story and Two Hats Publishing, of the two pioneers of LGBT journalism discussing their books, their work and their lives. The discussion was moderated by Dallas Voice senior news writer David Taffet, with Managing Editor Tammye Nash.

—  Tammye Nash

How to ‘butch up’ a little boy at Halloween

Halloween is just around the corner, which means LGBTs everywhere are frantically trying to decide on the perfect Halloween costume.

But what about those youngsters, especially the little gay boys who may be a bit too flamboyant for their more conservative families? What happens to them.

This video from The Onion offers this glimpse into the hell they might have to endure.

—  Tammye Nash

HERO opponents air first ad, citing trans bathroom panic

Anti-HERO groups anti trans ad

A campaign image released by opponents of Houston’s Equal Rights Ordinance reveals the group’s strategy for successful repeal.

Opponents of Houston’s Equal Rights Ordinance aired their first radio ad yesterday, the first of what they promise to be a barrage of ads ahead of the Nov. 3 ballot referendum that will decide the ordinance’s fate.

According to the Houston Chronicle, the Campaign for Houston‘s one-minute ad features a young woman concerned for her safety. She wants to get pregnant, she says, but is afraid because the ordinance “will allow men to freely go into women’s bathrooms, locker rooms and showers.

“That is filthy, that is disgusting and that is unsafe,” she states.

The nondiscrimination ordinance, which passed city council last year and has been mired in legal battles initiated by opponents since, includes protections for LGBT people, as well as other federally protected classes including sex, race, color, ethnicity, national origin, age, religion, disability, pregnancy, genetic information, family, marital or military status. Violators could be fined up to $5,000.

Opponents, including conservative Christian leaders, immediately gathered signatures for a ballot referendum. The city ultimately threw the petitions out, but opponents scored a victory earlier this month when the Texas Supreme Court forced the council to either repeal the ordinance or put it before voters on the Nov. 3 ballot.

City council members voted to put it before the voters on 12-5 vote.

Richard Carlbom, campaign manager for Houston Unites, which supports the ordinance, blasted the ad in a statement.

“The ad is grossly inaccurate. Nothing in the equal rights ordinance changes the fact that it is — and always will be — illegal to enter a restroom to harm or harass other people. The ad leaves out the fact that the law protects tens of thousands of Houstonians from job discrimination based upon their race, age, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity and disability,” he said.

Houston Unites also plans to also broadcast media in support of the ordinance. But the campaign has not made any media buys yet, he told the Chronicle.

—  James Russell

NPR’s ‘ATC’ gets gay co-host

arishapiroHe wasn’t supposed to start until September, so I was surprised yesterday when Ari Shapiro began as one of the three co-hosts of All Things Considered, the most-listened-to radio news program in the country, which airs on Dallas’ NPR affiliate, KERA 90.1 FM, from 4–7:30 p.m. daily. Shapiro replaced Melissa Block, who stepped down after 12 years alongside Robert Siegel and Audie Cornish.

The reason we care, other than being addicted to National Public Radio, is that Shapiro is openly gay — the first out host of the flagship program that we know of. It’s not like gays are rare on NPR, either nationally or locally, but this seems significant to us. Why? Well, if we didn’t believe that being a “gay journalist” was different than be a “journalist,” we wouldn’t work for a gay media company. And being out is important — it brings a perspective and challenges politicos and pundits to think about their words … or get caught up in what they say afterwards. We might bristle if someone says “the homosexual lifestyle” where even a progressive wouldn’t … and we might then hold their feet to the fire. (Compare, for instance, Diane Rehm, who routinely fails to invite openly gay journalists to her Friday News Roundup shows, even as she discusses gay issues … imagine if she had only men talking about women’s rights or only whites discussing race issues week after week.)

So I say “yea!” for Shapiro, who’s been a great London correspondent for years. He might put the “all” into All Things Considered.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones