Don’t forget your gift and card for Powerbottom Appreciation Day on Saturday

So, what exactly do you get your favorite powerbottom? The gift ideas here don’t make much sense, but that Wiki page does give you the back story on the annual holiday. “Power Bottom Appreciation Day is an annual holiday that recognizes Power Bottoms, as well as the positive contributions that they make to society. According to Durban Bud, it is celebrated on the 30th of October, which, ironically, is also National Candy Corn Day.” Although, wouldn’t that be more of a coincidence? Bud cites on his 2006 blog post Martha Stewart hints for PBAD after the jump, but I think he jests:

According to a Martha Stewart magazine article, we’re supposed to treat Power Bottoms with the utmost respect on this day by gifting them with flowers (preferably rosebuds), fancy non-spicy dinners, easily digestible chocolates (with NO almonds) and, of course, constant verbal praise followed by light fanny pats.

If you have the money and want to go all out, Martha suggests purchasing loose diamonds and then wrapping them in a handmade gift box with a copy of Maya Angelou’s award-winning poem, “My Precious Power Bottom, I’m So Thankful I Got ‘Im.”

Because I saw it first on Wikipedia, I wasn’t sure if there was any truth to it. A Google search proved me wrong. There is even an underwhelming website marking the day. Although there is nothing overly official out there on the subject, the word is well out on what I figure is a top’s favorite holiday. And, if you see anyone donning a pink rose, or officially a rosebud, wish them a happy PBAD.

As for what to get your special PB? Well, the obvious “toy” would be a little too cliche and phallic items from the produce aisle aren’t overly special. But since it’s also Halloween, how about a nice, giant gummy worm? And some imagination.

And it’s ribbed.

—  Rich Lopez

Did Chef Gordon Ramsay’s harsh criticism drive Oak Cliff’s Rachel Brown to suicide in 2007?

Rachel Brown

More than three years ago we published this short story about the apparent suicide of Rachel Brown, an Oak Cliff-based personal chef who’d been a contestant on the Fox reality show Hell’s Kitchen.

This Tuesday, we noticed that for some strange reason, our story about Brown’s death was experiencing a remarkable surge in online readership (with now more than 3,000 page views in the last two days). When we looked into it, we discovered that the main “entry source” for recent readers of the story is the Google search phrase, “Rachel Brown Hell’s Kitchen.” But why, we wondered, is everyone all of a sudden searching this? Well, for one thing the new season of Hell’s Kitchen began last week. But a much bigger factor has surely been this story from CBS News, prompted by the recent suicide of another cooking show contestant:

Joseph Cerniglia, 39, of Pompton Lakes, N.J., apparently leaped to his death yesterday from the George Washington Bridge, the New York Post reported. The owner of a restaurant in suburban New York, Cerniglia had appeared in 2007 on “Kitchen Nightmares,” a show that subjected struggling restaurateurs to harsh criticism from English foodie Gordon Ramsay.

In 2007, 41-year-old Rachel Brown reportedly shot herself to death after appearing on “Hell’s Kitchen,” another show that featured Ramsay.

Ramsay is famously tough on contestants.

“Your business is about to f – - king swim down the Hudson,” Ramsay told Cerniglia, the married father of three, according to the Daily Mail.

Does that kind of talk drive people to kill themselves?

Probably not, says the former president of the American Academy of Suicidology, Dr. Robert Yufit.

“My guess is that both of these people had major problems before appearing on the show,” Yufit told CBS News. “I would almost bet that the show itself should not be held responsible. I would say say that the show might have tripped off something else that was going on in their lives.

—  John Wright