Not in my America!


The Republicans just spent a week trying to build a winning hand, but proved that the only card they have left to play is Trump-ed up fear


Haberman-Hardy-I admit it. I watched the Republican National Convention.

It left me very confused, because speech after speech by second-tier GOP luminaries played the only card left in the Republican hand: fear.

We should be afraid of the crime wave sweeping America! We should be afraid of all the criminal illegal Mexicans pouring across our borders! We should be afraid of the terrorists that are slaughtering more people now in America than ever! We should be afraid of the economic disaster the Obama presidency has wrought on America! We should be afraid of the weakened state of defense! We should be afraid of Obamacare! We should be afraid of transgender people invading our son’s and daughter’s bathrooms! We should be afraid of the massive unemployment that this administration has caused and even more fearful of Hillary Clinton continuing on the same trajectory! We should be afraid of the elitism! We are a country in a crisis!

I think I ran out of exclamation points.

What amazes me is that every speaker — with the possible exception of Mrs. Trump — gave the same speech.

More amazing is the country these people are describing. It is an America largely based on fiction, an America that exists only on Fox News and in the minds of the huddled “preppers” who sit in their shelters awaiting the end times.

It is a completely different America than the one in which I live.

In my America, crime statistics show a steady decline in violent crime. In fact, a report from the Brookings Institute shows violent crime has fallen 51 percent since 1991, and is at one of the lowest rates since 1970.

In my America, the rate of illegal immigration has stabilized not increased, and in the case of Mexican immigrants it is actually declining.

And by the way, those illegal immigrants pay taxes. According to the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy, in 2013 they paid $7 billion in sales taxes, $1.1 billion in income taxes and $3.6 billion in property taxes.

And as far as their “criminal” behavior — well, of the 14,196 murders committed in 2013, a frightening total of eight were committed by illegal immigrants.

In my America, the economic disaster is the one we are still recovering from — and it started during the Bush administration. Stocks are at all-time highs, and the last report shows unemployment has fallen from close to 10 percent when Obama took office in 2008 to the current rate of 4.9 percent.

Sounds like an economic recovery to me.

In my America, our military spending is higher than the next six countries’ spending combined, including China, Russia, Saudi Arabia, the United Kingdom and India. If anything, we need to cut back on that spending.

In my America, the Affordable Care Act has resulted in fewer people being uninsured. The number dropped from 41.8 million uninsured in 2013 to 33.0 million 2014 (last year available so far). Not everyone, but a pretty good success in a short time, and this in spite of the fact that many states declined to expand Medicaid to help their citizens afford insurance.

In my America, transgender people just want to use the toilet when they go to a public restroom, just like everyone else. In fact, the number of transgender people lurking in bathrooms to prey on unsuspecting people is exactly ZERO. The alleged “cases” that have been reported have all proven to be hoaxes generated by right-wing blogs.

In my America, the elitism I see is a presidential candidate giving interviews sitting in a golden chair in a penthouse apartment of a building with his name emblazoned in gold on the side. That qualifies as elite in my book, as does his private jet and helicopter.

In my America, I am not as afraid of terrorists sneaking into the country as I am of home-grown terrorists staging standoffs with government agents and bombing abortion clinics and shooting up gay nightclubs. And statistically, I am more likely to be killed by my own furniture falling on me than a terrorist.

So all this fear-mongering about our country in crisis? Well, the crisis I see is the very real possibility that the fearmongers will gain the White House. And that would be a big problem in my book.

Take a look at the GOP platform and if you are anyone but a straight, white Protestant you will find something to give you shivers.

The week-long fear fest of the Republican National Convention comes down to one thing: They offer our country a single item. They have come to the end of their deck and all they have left is their “Trump” card: It’s called Fear.

Hardy Haberman is a longtime local LGBT activist and board member for the Woodhull Freedom Alliance. His blog is at

—  Tammye Nash

“Bro jobs” and what it means to be gay


Arecent article talking about the “bro job” — a sex act between heterosexual men — has me questioning the whole sexuality alphabet soup we live in.

LGBTQAAI (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, asexual, allies, intersex), etc., seems to be getting a bit awkward, and perhaps someday soon we will just refer to people as “people.”

Haberman-Hardy-I ponder this because I personally know of several “straight” men who have experimented with MSM (the current term for “men having sex with men but who are not gay”).  A couple of them even admit they like it better than PIV (penis in vagina) sex, yet they have no emotional attraction to men other than as friends.

Perhaps it’s time we stopped classifying ourselves by what we do with our sex organs, and start understanding who we are by who we love and how we express that love.

I know it’s not that radical an idea, but for a man who grew up and came out immediately post-Stonewall declaring myself gay or bi or whatever was important. It was planting my flag and staking out territory where I could feel safe.

At a time when merely hinting at attraction for another man would get you shunned, ridiculed or in some cases beaten up, coming out was a revolutionary act. In some places it still is.

The bars and baths and clubs and institutions of the LGBT world — the gayborhood — were a safe space where we could express our sexuality and nurture our activism. We had a common cause.

Meanwhile, the metrosexuals of the world don’t find sexual identity as important as I and my brothers and sisters “of a certain age” once did. They are more comfortable with sexual fluidity and less likely to identify with the alphabet soup.

Because of this, the old institutions of lesbian and gay culture are dwindling. Gay bars no longer are unlabeled places in dicey neighborhoods. Lesbians are as likely to meet up at a trendy bistro in the West Village as at Sue Ellen’s.

Even the once sacrosanct venue of the leather bar has changed. Once a bastion of male energy with a strict dress code, today’s leather bars are welcoming to everyone. You are as likely to see someone there dressed in slacks and a sweater as chaps and a harness.

What this really means is that the institutions and attitudes that drove LGBT people together, the places where gay culture was born, have changed forever. With that change, there is a real chance that the culture they facilitated and nurtured may disappear.

That may be inevitable.

Oppressed minorities are like nuclear reactors that generate fashions, language and behaviors with a unique texture and color. This was true of New York Yiddish culture in the 1920s and ’30s, black culture from the Harlem Renaissance to hip-hop and, to an extent, Tejano culture in the last few decades.

Gay culture was born in the same atmosphere, and our fashion, our music, our campiness and our butchness was the chain reaction resulting from that oppression.

But as we are integrated into society, we may lose that critical mass that caused the explosion of creativity and culture.  We may lose our identity based on our sexuality.

Whether that is a good or a bad thing remains to be seen.

Hardy Haberman is a longtime local LGBT activist and board member for the Woodhull Freedom Alliance. His blog is at

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition May 20, 2016.

—  Craig Tuggle

Step right up!

GOP presidential race NOT the greatest show on earth, but certainly has its share of clowns

Haberman-Hardy-I have held my tongue regarding the current slate of Republicans running for their party’s presidential nomination.

I have held my tongue as I watched more than a dozen “candidates” jockey for position, each trying to move further right than the next. I have held my tongue as the press has breathlessly reported on the latest insane rant by what passes as politicians in the GOP.

I have held my tongue because as everyone knows my hand would burn should I ever press the Republican button on a voting machine.

But sometimes, the crazy just overwhelms me and I have to speak. So here goes.

More than a year ago, most folks with any political savvy anticipated the candidacy of the next in line in the Bush dynasty, Jeb (Jeb!), to run for president. He was carefully groomed, like his brothers George W. and Neil. George was maneuvered into a governorship in order to hone his political skills and prepare him for the White House. His brother Neil seemed to be on the same track until his political train was derailed by the whole Silverado Savings and Loan debacle.

Enter Jeb (Jeb!).

His time as governor of Florida made him an ideal choice for a GOP presidential candidate. The buzz in political circles was that Jeb (Jeb!) was the candidate to beat, and everything looked like pretty smooth sailing — until the Republican boat ran aground on the Tea Party reef.

The frustrations expressed by most Tea Party folks stem from a feeling that they have lost control of the country. The phrase “Take back our nation” is a common one among the Oolong crowd, but it really is thinly veiled code for “There is a black man in the White House.”

Add to this wage stagnation and economic woes — brought on by the previous GOP regime, but not really felt until the first Obama term — and you have a powerful force.

These are irate folks who believe that the Republicans, who pretty much caused their problems, must be the ones to fix things. I blame Fox News and the right wing talk radio machine for most of that.

Meanwhile, riding on the crest of the Tea kettle boil-over comes Ted Cruz and an assortment of people who all are saying the same things. The drone of their rhetoric pretty much drowned out Jeb (Jeb!) and left him looking uncharismatic, which frankly, he is.

Enter The Donald. Mr Trump, whose ego is only exceeded by his crass demeanor, broke through the clutter of GOP wannabes and the gullible public took notice. After all, compared to Jeb (Jeb!), Trump looks appealing — or at least different.

That difference is why he has topped the polls. When asked, a lot of Republican voters say, “He speaks his mind,” and “He is not intimidated by political correctness.”

They are correct, But those attributes do not a president make.

Trump is a bull in the GOP china shop, and his reckless bluster has stolen the spotlight from all other GOP candidates — except for one, Ben Carson.

Dr. Carson seems positively a statesman compared to Trump, and even though his soft-spoken performance is riddled with misinformation and downright idiocy, he looks safer than Trump.

The rest of the gang, with the possible exception of Mario Rubio, are cut from the same cloth, and it’s a polka dot pattern suitable for the circus.

So what does this mean for LGBTQ people?

Well, all of the GOP candidates are far from on the right side of our issues, and only the most deluded in the Cabin think the party will “come around” any time soon. The Republican Party is conservative, and that means resistant to change.

LGBTQ rights would be change, so don’t count on hearing any candidate lay out a plan for full equality for us.

Trump, for all his bellicosity, is probably the most benign for us. But that still comes with statements like, regarding same-sex marriage, he “just doesn’t feel good about it.” Yet he has said there should be “no discrimination against gays.”

Make of that what you will.

The ultimate battle for the GOP nomination has yet to play out, and I feel sure there will be more “entertaining” debates in the near future. My biggest problem is with the American people who have actually been hoodwinked into believing that there is anyone in the crowd of GOP hopefuls that is presidential material.

We are a country that has decided to eschew intellectualism in favor of spectacle. I feel sure P.T. Barnum is chuckling in his grave, knowing that an entire generation of fools may decide the fate of our country.

Hardy Haberman is a longtime local LGBT activist and board member for the Woodhull Freedom Alliance. His blog is at

—  Tammye Nash

As LGBTs near equality in marriage, right wingers once again ramp up The Fear Game

Haberman-Hardy-As we make more gains toward full equality, it seems the right-wing is cranking up the effort to deny it.  Funny that our freedom is so frightening to them — or perhaps not.

Fear is a powerful emotion. It can guide you out of trouble and keep you safe, but irrational fear has the opposite effect.

When I was a child I had an irrational fear of insects, perhaps because I once swallowed a June bug while trying to emulate a frog. I was just a toddler, but I remember the event pretty clearly.

For years after that, any bug, particularly those that flew, sent me into a panic. I would dodge and weave every time I saw a honeybee or wasp, convincing myself they were targeting me.

Once coming home from school, I passed a honeysuckle bush which was in bloom. Bees were busily gathering nectar, but to me they were lying in wait. In an effort to avoid them, I fell off the front porch into a holly bush. I suspect the scratches I got there were worse than any bee sting would have been.

In truth, the bees didn’t give a damn about me; they had work to do, and unless I was a flower, they had no interest

LGBT people are much like those honeybees. We have lives to live and work to do and just want to be left alone. Yet the right-wing treats us as though we are intent on swarming over them.

Why are pundits and politicians cranking up the rhetoric and stoking that fear? Simple: If you are conservative, you are inherently resistant to change. You want to preserve the status quo and change scares you, especially if it is change that you do not understand.

For years conservative politicians — both Republican and Democrat — have known this and used the fear tactics to motivate their constituents.

During the 1960s it was fear of integration. The idea that black and white Americans would share the same facilities and services frightened people who had been indoctrinated in the myth that the color of your skin could be an indicator as to your trustworthiness and civility.

It was expressed most blatantly in the fear of miscegenation. The very idea that black and white couple could marry sent chills through down some voters’ spines.  The “white race” must be preserved, and diluting it with “colored blood” was horrifying, if you wanted to maintain things as they were.

The Supreme Court buried that fear with Loving v Virginia, a ruling that made marriages legal in all states, no matter what the race of the participants.

After a few years the fear of racial mixing subsided and the right turned toward other fears. As our country’s population became more diverse, the fear of “the other” was a fruitful tactic.

The most obvious “other” in Texas was the large Mexican-American population and undocumented immigrants. They were all lumped together and again politicians used them as a specter to signal a “vast change” that was happening.

That change was nothing new; immigrants had always come to our country and would continue to come to our country. But when they had accents or looked slightly different than white Americans, they could be used as pawns in the Fear Game.

Well, welcome to the world of being a pawn. Now that same-sex marriage seems to be almost a “fait accompli,” the fear engine needs stoking. And LGBT people are still active on the board.

Irrational fears about what “the gays” will do next will become more and more prominent in the rhetoric of the right wing, especially as elections near.  It’s the only tactic they have left.

As pieces in this nasty game, we can either play along like good little pawns, or we can leave the board entirely. What I mean by that is, we can refuse to be drawn into the framing used so well by the GOP and their operatives.

We must not fall prey to the “fight for marriage” which the LGBT community was pushed into and fight for full equality. We will be demonized, harangued and accused of a multitude of fictitious sins in coming months, and we have to refuse to be drawn into it.

By stopping to rebut a specious claim, we only serve to reinforce the framing. If you want a primer on this. read George Lakoff’s Don’t Think of an Elephant. It explains this in detail and offers alternatives.

Personally, when I hear the insane claims of the right-wing pundits and preachers, I usually laugh and then change the subject to what I want: equal rights. It takes persistence and resolve, but it’s possible.

And next time Tony Perkins or his clones say things like LGBT activists are going to “start rolling out the boxcars and carting away Christians,” respond with, “As LGBT Americans, we are very concerned about freedom and equality. Let’s talk about equal rights for all Americans.”


Hardy Haberman is a longtime local LGBT activist and board member for the Woodhull Freedom Alliance. His blog is at

—  Tammye Nash

With Halloween just a week away ….

(And the Cedar Springs Halloween Block Party happening tomorrow night — Saturday, Oct. 25), I thought it was appropriate to share this video here on Instant Tea. Thanks, Hardy Haberman, for sharing it with me.

—  Tammye Nash

PHOTOS: Six Dallas LGBT leaders tell their stories at Outrageous Oral 5


Six LGBT community members told their stories as part of The Dallas Way’s Outrageous Oral 5 on Thursday.

Candy Marcum began the evening with the story of how Oak Lawn Community Services came into being. She partnered with counselor Howie Daire to begin a counseling service for gay people. Without the Internet, they promoted their business by talking to bartenders who made many referrals.

Marcum said she ended up with many male clients because it would have been unethical for Daire to work with anyone professionally whom he had sex with.

Darryl Baker spoke about being prevented from entering the gay clubs without four forms of identification and Nell Gaither’s piece was about her work for the transgender community today.

Steve Atkinson mostly talked about his work to pass local and state legislation. But he told about death threats he got while doing that work and said it was the first time he told the story in public. The police took those threats seriously but were not able to trace the call in an era before caller ID.

Hardy Haberman told about how he became part of the leather community and Cordell Adams wrapped all of the stories together before telling his own story of growing up in East Texas and moving “across the tracks.”

The Dallas Way taped the presentation, which will be available on its YouTube channel. The organization is working with University of North Texas to preserve Dallas LGBT history.

More photos below.

—  David Taffet

From LIFE magazine leather to Baylor and Channel 39: A coming out story

The June 1964 issue of LIFE magazine.

Someone asked me recently when I first “came out.” I started to rattle off a date, but decided to consider my answer more seriously. For me coming out was a process. I had a pretty good idea I liked guys by my first year in high school, but at that time, 1964, there was little support for someone like me.

I first realized there were others who might share my desires in a very strange circumstance. I was on a jet, bound for London, with my parents. The flight attendant was passing around magazines and I ended up with the June 1964 issue of LIFE magazine. That issue had a bombshell article in it called “Homosexuality in America,” and though it was supposed to be an expose of a sordid world, the double-page photograph of the Tool Box Bar spoke to me only of desire. It was a shadowy, black and white photo of dozens of men, most wearing leather jackets and caps, crowded into what was one of the early San Francisco leather bars.

To a 14-year-old boy who had never quite been able to put his finger on what he wanted sexually, it was all I could do to not scream out, “YES, that’s what I want!”

It took another three years before I finally spoke with my mother about my sexuality, and then only in the most general terms. My father died when I was 18 and our household was pretty much in upheaval, so I don’t think my mom really got what I was telling her. My friends already knew, and in fact I had already had sexual experiences with a few of the guys I hung out with. To them it wasn’t important to “come out”; we were just exploring sexual possibilities and by the time I entered college, there were plenty of opportunities to explore.

—  Hardy Haberman

How the Cathedral of Hope saved a black church that nearly became a martyr for marriage equality

The Rev. Jo Hudson

In today’s Voice we have a column by local leatherman and regular contributor Hardy Haberman about the straight pastor of a predominantly African-American church in St. Paul, Minn., whose support for marriage equality cost him 72 percent of his flock and now poses a financial threat to the very survival of his congregation.

Haberman focuses on how the pastor, the Rev. Oliver White of Grace Community United Church, did the right thing regardless of the potential consequences when he voted in favor of a resolution supporting marriage equality at a United Church of Christ meeting in 2005.

Haberman reports that he got wind of White’s predicament when his own pastor, the Rev. Jo Hudson at Cathedral of Hope UCC in Dallas, issued an appeal on behalf of Grace Community UCC during a recent service.

On Thursday, Religion News Service and the Washington Post picked up this same story, shedding some light on the ensuing response from Haberman’s fellow worshippers at the Cathedral.

Turns out, although White sent letters seeking financial assistance to 40 UCC congregations across the country, he got only three responses — one for $500, one for $600 and “a miracle donation from Dallas.” The donation from the Cathedral, raised during two services on the same Sunday, totaled $15,000 and has allowed Grace Community UCC to keep its doors open, at least for now.

The Cathedral, commonly referred to as the world’s largest gay church, also happens to be UCC’s fourth-largest congregation.

Below is a snippet from the WaPo piece, which you can and should read in its entirety by going here:

—  John Wright

Agree with the pope? Nope!

Pontiff once again speaks out against LGBT equality, saying same-sex marriage is a threat to ‘the future of humanity’


Hardy Haberman
Flagging Left

When you hear someone with as powerful a voice as the pope say something is a threat to “the future of humanity itself,” you take notice. Pope Benedict uttered these weighty words this week, and what was he talking about? Nuclear capabilities in Iran? Global warming? Famine? Drought?

The Holy Father was speaking about marriage equality. Apparently in the rarified air of the Vatican, allowing LGBT people to affirm their relationships and have the same legal rights as heterosexual couples would have apocalyptic results.

In his statement to a gathering of diplomats from 180 countries, the pope said that children need the proper settings in which to grow, and that “pride of place goes to the family based on the marriage of a man and a woman.”

He went on to assert that, “This is not a simple social convention, but rather the fundamental cell of every society. Consequently, policies which undermine the family threaten human dignity and the future of humanity itself.”

This little gem was part of his yearly address to the diplomatic corps accredited to the Vatican. Unlike with any other religion in the world, the U.S. actually has an ambassador to the Vatican, representing the Catholic Church, as do many other countries.

It is a mystery I fail to understand, but it is what it is.

This statement comes on the heels of the elevation of New York Archbishop Timothy Dolan to the status of cardinal. Not surprisingly, Dolan is one of the leading anti-LGBT voices in the Catholic Church.

And Pope Benedict himself is certainly no friend of LGBT folk either. In a 1986 pastoral letter he wrote before becoming pontiff, then-Cardinal Ratzinger said that homosexuality was “an intrinsic moral evil” and “an objective disorder.”

Now to put this in perspective, the Catholic Church claims 1.3 billion adherents worldwide. This is why what the pope says is news.

But I fail to see this statement coming from the voice of the moral high ground.

The Vatican has been implicated in numerous scandals in recent years, and most of them involve inappropriate sexual behavior with minors. Many of these same scandals not only involve priests, but the systematic coverup of the crimes.

The courts of the U.S. and Europe have been busy prosecuting these cases, and the new media has covered them ad nauseam.

For me, the big question is this: In a world with so many social and humanitarian problems, why is preventing LGBT people from marrying worthy of such hyperbole?

Will allowing my partner and me to marry for the purposes of gaining the 1,000-plus legal benefits awarded to straight couples in the U.S. going to shake the foundations of our country? Is a gay marriage going to cause straight people to throw up their hands saying, “Well there goes the neighborhood” and divorce?

This all has to do with control — and few people understand control as well as the current pope. Cardinal Ratzinger was the “enforcer” for the Vatican before his elevation to pontiff. His office was the Supreme Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, a group previously known as (until 1965) Supreme Sacred Congregation of the Roman and Universal Inquisition.  You remember them and their always “unexpected” counterpart, the Spanish Inquisition?

The pope will continue to demonize LGBT people and oppose our relationships as long as it serves to increase his control. Much like right-wing politicians, the pope can use this issue as a wedge issue, prying the faithful away from any attempt at social justice in the matter of LGBT rights.

Moreover, this is also designed to bolster the argument that “hate speech” should be protected as a freedom of religion issue, a recent tactic being used by the far-right to oppose LGBT rights and anti-bullying efforts.

Am I suggesting that the pope is colluding with politicians to deny LGBT people their rights? Perhaps not. But his statements will surely be used by the right wing to bolster their arguments.

I just find it sad that the man who has assumed the mantle of the vicar of Christ can so conveniently ignore that Jesus said nothing about LGBT people in any recorded documents. He did, however, say something to the effect of, “Feed the hungry, clothe the naked, heal the sick and visit the prisoner.”
Hardy Haberman is a longtime local LGBT activist and a board member of the Woodhull Freedom Alliance. His blog is at

—  Kevin Thomas

Enduring enigma

Alan Turing’s pioneering work made modern technology possible. But because he was gay, he remains, technically, a criminal

Last week my partner and I gave each other early Christmas gifts: We exchanged iPads. As we got home with our new gadgets, I made an assessment of the number of computers we had in our house, and I was astounded.

Between us we have no fewer than eight computers, not counting the tiny computers we carry with us that we mistakenly call our telephones.

I remarked to my partner, “We are living in the age of Star Trek, minus the replicators, transporters and warp drive.”

And that is pretty much a true statement. The things we can do now with our iPhones would have astounded the top minds at IBM just 15 short years ago.

So many amazing gadgets that make our lives easier, better and richer are to a great extent the result of the pioneering work of a gay man from the United Kingdom named Alan Turing. Turing was a brilliant mathematician whose contributions to the concepts of algorithms and computation made all those computers in our house possible.


Hardy Haberman Flagging Left

Furthermore, his work in cryptanalysis in the now-famous Bletchley Park Government Code and Cypher School led to the development of a machine known then as the “bombe.” It was an electromechanical code-breaking computer that broke the German Enigma code and helped stop Hitler. Because of his work, Turing was awarded the Order of the British Empire in 1945, an honor roughly equivalent to a Congressional Medal of Honor.

His amazing body of work, most of which is so highly technical that it is hard to describe in such a short space, has led historians to call Alan Turing the “Father of Computer Science.” Without Alan Turing, I would most likely be typing this column on an electric typewriter. Such was his impact on our modern world.

The dark side of his story happened in 1952. That year, he met a man outside a cinema in Manchester and they struck up a relationship. Turing invited the man, Arnold Murry, to his house several times. On one of those visits, Murry opened Turing’s house up to a thief, his accomplice, and they stole several things from his home.

When Turning reported it to the police, he admitted that Murry was more than just a visitor; Murry was his lover.
And that’s where the story gets dark.

Turing and Murry were both charged with “gross indecency” because homosexual acts were illegal in the United Kingdom at that time. Turing was convicted and given an onerous choice: He could go to prison or he could accept probation, the terms of which included chemical castration via hormone injections.

Turing’s security clearance was rescinded and he was prevented from ever working in the field of cryptanalysis again. He was even prevented from ever discussing his work during World War II.

Turing was found dead on a June morning in 1954, with a half-eaten apple beside his bed. The autopsy showed he had ingested cyanide, possibly from the apple, and his death was ruled a suicide.

What makes this tale even sadder is that to this date, Alan Turing has never received an official pardon from the British government.

Today there are statues and plaques and tributes to the “Father of Modern Computing.” He even received a posthumous apology from then-Prime Minister Gordon Brown in 2009.

But his criminal record still stands.

The inhumane treatment Turing endured has been acknowledged, but this great man deserves more.

Today there is a movement to have the government pardon Alan Turing as we enter the new year. One hundred years after his birth, the global scientific community has declared 2012 as “Alan Turing Year, a Centenary Celebration of the Life and Work of Alan Turing.” It seems fitting that during his commemorative year, the British government could offer a posthumous pardon to a man to whom we all owe so much.

So far there are only a few thousand signatures to the petition. It is my hope that every LGBT individual will sign it as an offering to one of our own who gave us so much. Why it has taken this long is truly an enigma.

The petition is online at:

Hardy Haberman is a longtime local LGBT activist and a board member of the Woodhull Freedom Alliance. His blog is at

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition December 9, 2011.

—  Kevin Thomas