Former NBA star John Amaechi barred from hometown gay club: he’s ‘big & black & could be trouble’

Via Towleroad, a clear sign that it’s not a post-racial society across the pond either. Bonus points in this case for these clubs employing a shared security system to do their racial profiling and have closed ranks regarding the controversy.

“When Amaechi questioned the decision, the doorman said it was a ‘private members’ bar.’ He then allegedly claimed that the New York Times best-selling author had been flagged up as ‘trouble’ on the gay village’s shared security radio network. A spokesperson for the bar later told Amaechi’s representative: ‘Your group was stopped from entering the venue on Friday night as a message was received over the NiteNet radio system, (a system where several venues work together within the village, where they announce any issues they have with any customers), that your group had been argumentative and aggressive to another venue’s doorstaff. On interview with the staff who were present at the time, we are satisfied that there were no racism or bigotry comments as you suggest. All three staff who were present on the door at the time have been with us for over 14 months and none of them have ever displayed the attitude or characteristics you suggest in your email. You have clearly misunderstood the situation and perhaps justifying your exclusion that evening. We consider this matter closed now.’”

The other bars, VIA and Taurus, which use the NiteNet system deny there was any such warning about Amaechi’s behavior.

According to the paper, “Amaechi’s representatives have lodged a complaint with the Equality and Human Rights Commission along with a complaint to the Manchester City Council LGBT affairs director, Terry Waller and also with the Greater Manchester Police LGBT liaison office.”

This took place in Manchester, UK, Amaechi’s flipping hometown! Oh, and what part of “big and black and could be trouble” isn’t racist? Why would Amaechi even bother making something ridiculous like that up? I wonder where this case will go.

***

Back on our side of the Atlantic, and close to home, a sheriff here in NC goes on a nostalgia trip because required probable cause for pulling motorists over has cramped his style re: racial profiling, and general illegal chicanery.

Wake County Sheriff Donnie Harrison says the constitutional protection against unjustified searches and seizures inhibits law enforcement and it would be better if police could pull over motorists without probable cause.

Harrison, a Republican seeking election to a third four-year term in November, makes his comments in a video interview on the YouTube channel of Tom Murry, a Morrisville councilman running for the state House in the 41st District, which includes parts of Raleigh, Apex, Cary and Morrisville.

In the video, Murry asks, “Is the state making it easier for you to do your job or making it more difficult?”

Harrison, a former North Carolina Highway Patrol trooper, responds, “The biggest thing I see is the way we interpret laws. Back when I was a young trooper, we could stop a car anytime we wanted to to see if they had a driver’s license. Now you can’t do it. You have to have suspicion of probable cause. So, to me, it’s sort of burden on us.”

Pam’s House Blend – Front Page

—  John Wright

Will The Air Force Punish Sgt. David Gutierrez For Hitting Swingers Parties Without Revealing He’s HIV-Positive?

Air Force Sgt. David Gutierrez, a twenty-year veteran stationed at McConnell Air Force Base , is being probed by the Air Force Office of Special Investigations over allegations he failed to disclose he's HIV-positive to all the sex partners he met at swingers parties. Including dudes!

CONTINUED »


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Queerty

—  John Wright

Dan Savage on Mitch McConnell taking Obama’s word that he’s a Christian

Yesterday, on Meet the Press, Mitch McConnell talked about Obama’s religion:

“The president says he’s a Christian. I take him at his word. I don’t think that’s in dispute,”

Dan Savage provides the only appropriate response.




AMERICAblog Gay

—  John Wright

Pakman on FRC’s McClusky: ‘He’s either flat-out lying or he doesn’t know what his own organization says’

David Pakman continues to slam dunk, this time with an assist from yours truly:

*Our piece on the horse: No, no, FRC doesn’t do the whole people/animals thing. Ya know, except on the first page of one of their anti-gay brochures, complete with a graphic of a horse [G-A-Y]

**EARLIER Pakman: Pakman takes on McClusky [G-A-Y]

Pakman (and Signorile) take on Terry Jones [G-A-Y]

Pakman takes on Labarbera [G-A-Y]




Good As You

—  John Wright

Liberal Los Angelenos Find Something Obama-Related to Complain About: He’s Bad For Traffic

To help raise a reported million for the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, President Obama dropped in to LAX, hit up the Beverly Hills Hotel, and then drove to producer John Wells's Hancock Park home in Los Angeles, where he was met by director JJ Abrams, Nancy Pelosi, Judd Apatow, Taye Diggs, and Idina Menzel. And in doing so? He caused a traffic nightmare, tying up major boulevards, which in turn clogged cross-streets, and left drivers stranded in parking lot traffic for hours on end. The Huffington Post's headline: "Does President Obama Owe Los Angeles An Apology?" And there are calls for an investigation.

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Queerty

—  John Wright

Santorum 2012. He’s seriously considering it.

Santorum for President.

That’s what he’s thinking:

In an interview with The Daily Caller, former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum said he’s actively cultivating donors, staff and supporters so he’ll be in a position to run for president in 2012 as a Republican if he decides to do so by early next year.

“I’m going through the process of what someone who is seriously considering running would do,” Santorum said by phone, “in order for when the time comes to decide, I’m in a position that I have a choice.”

Santorum—who was elected to the Senate in 1994 but left in 2006 after losing his seat—said he plans to make a decision on a presidential bid by either the end of this year, or the beginning of 2011.

Now, Ricky’s got some hurdles to overcome. Like the thrashing he took on Election Day in 2006. AMERICAblog did an hour-by-hour countdown til the polls closed at 8:00 in Pennsylvania. Check out our 8:00 PM post here.

The latest polling on same-sex marriage is going to make it harder for Santorum to base his campaign on hating the gays. Might help get him the GOP nomination (they still hate gays), but Ricky wants to be President. Gay marriage has been one of Ricky’s favorite subjects for years. Remember this infamous gem from 2003?:

Every society in the history of man has upheld the institution of marriage as a bond between a man and a woman. Why? Because society is based on one thing: that society is based on the future of the society. And that’s what? Children. Monogamous relationships. In every society, the definition of marriage has not ever to my knowledge included homosexuality. That’s not to pick on homosexuality. It’s not, you know, man on child, man on dog, or whatever the case may be. It is one thing. And when you destroy that you have a dramatic impact on the quality —

AP: I’m sorry, I didn’t think I was going to talk about “man on dog” with a United States senator, it’s sort of freaking me out.

SANTORUM: And that’s sort of where we are in today’s world, unfortunately. The idea is that the state doesn’t have rights to limit individuals’ wants and passions. I disagree with that. I think we absolutely have rights because there are consequences to letting people live out whatever wants or passions they desire. And we’re seeing it in our society.

AP: Sorry, I just never expected to talk about that when I came over here to interview you. Would a President Santorum eliminate a right to privacy — you don’t agree with it?

SANTORUM: I’ve been very clear about that. The right to privacy is a right that was created in a law that set forth a (ban on) rights to limit individual passions. And I don’t agree with that. So I would make the argument that with President, or Senator or Congressman or whoever Santorum, I would put it back to where it is, the democratic process. If New York doesn’t want sodomy laws, if the people of New York want abortion, fine. I mean, I wouldn’t agree with it, but that’s their right. But I don’t agree with the Supreme Court coming in.

Think of the fun we’ll have with this campaign.




AMERICAblog Gay

—  John Wright

Show vs. Show • 03.26.10

By RICH LOPEZ | Staff Writer lopez@dallasvoice.com

Dallas doesn’t find itself too often in the middle of a gay live music dilemma. This weekend, two musicians might get to bring their sounds to the masses. That is, if LGBT Dallas heads out to support their own.

Tommy Hernandez was mostly on the local music scene as a solo artist but his latest venture takes him away from pop music into a trancey realm. As one half of Museum Creatures, he and Stephen Holmes go the electronica route.

Museum Creatures is part of the Mercy for Animals Benefit at the Cavern on Lower Greenville. They share a heavy bill with Soft Environmental Collapse, Division of Power and more for the Rockout for Animals show.

Patrick Boothe approaches music with a raw attitude. In his latest release, Jump In, a five song EP, he explores his darker side.

Boothe relocated from Dallas to Austin partly to be near the music industry there. A lonely spell set in and provided inspiration for his newest set of songs. But he’s confident his gay audience will relate.

“I do have a mostly gay audience and they don’t listen to just the poppy music at gay clubs and bars you always hear.”

He’s alt-rock with a piano but more in the vein of Tori Amos. Yet, maybe a bit louder.

“It’s just me and a piano but it’s gonna be loud. I sing pretty loud and I’m not a classically trained pianist so it can get intense at times.”

He’s alt-rock with a piano but more in the vein of Tori Amos. Yet, maybe a bit louder.

“It’s just me and a piano but it’s gonna be loud. I sing pretty loud and I’m not a classically trained pianist so it can get intense at times.


— Rich Lopez

 


This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition March 26, 2010.


—  admin

Dallas could elect 1st gay judge

Judicial candidates John Loza, Tonya Parker among 4 LGBTs running in local races in 2010

By John Wright | News Editor wright@dallasvoice.com
IN THE RUNNING | Dallas County District Clerk Gary Fitzsimmons, clockwise from top left, County Judge Jim Foster, attorney Tonya Parker and former Councilman John Loza are LGBT candidates who plan to run in Dallas County elections in 2010. The filing period ends Jan. 4.

Dallas County has had its share of openly gay elected officials, from Sheriff Lupe Valdez to District Clerk Gary Fitzsimmons to County Judge Jim Foster.
But while Foster, who chairs the Commissioners Court, is called a “judge,” he’s not a member of the judiciary, to which the county’s voters have never elected an out LGBT person.

Two Democrats running in 2010 — John Loza and Tonya Parker — are hoping to change that.

“This is the first election cycle that I can remember where we’ve had openly gay candidates for the judiciary,” said Loza, a former Dallas City Councilman who’s been involved in local LGBT politics for decades. “It’s probably long overdue, to be honest with you.”

Dallas County’s Jerry Birdwell became the first openly gay judge in Texas when he was appointed by Gov. Ann Richards in 1992. But after coming under attack for his sexual orientation by the local Republican Party, Birdwell, a Democrat, lost his bid for re-election later that year.

Also in the November 1992 election, Democrat Barbara Rosenberg defeated anti-gay Republican Judge Jack Hampton.

But Rosenberg, who’s a lesbian, wasn’t out at the time and didn’t run as an openly LGBT candidate.

Loza, who’s been practicing criminal law in Dallas for the last 20 years, is running for the County Criminal Court No. 5 seat. Incumbent Tom Fuller is retiring. Loza said he expects to face three other Democrats in the March primary, meaning a runoff is likely. In addition to groups like Stonewall Democrats of Dallas, he said he’ll seek an endorsement from the Washington, D.C.-based Gay and Lesbian Victory Fund, which provides financial backing to LGBT candidates nationwide.

Parker, who’s running for the 116th Civil District Court seat, declined to be interviewed for this story. Incumbent Bruce Priddy isn’t expected to seek re-election, and Parker appears to be the favorite for the Democratic nomination.

If she wins in November, Parker would become the first LGBT African-American elected official in Dallas County.

Loza and Parker are among four known local LGBT candidates in 2010.
They join fellow Democrats Fitzsimmons and Foster, who are each seeking a second four-year term.

While Foster is vulnerable and faces two strong challengers in the primary, Fitzsimmons is extremely popular and said he’s confident he’ll be re-elected.

“I think pretty much everybody knows that the District Clerk’s Office is probably the best-run office in Dallas County government,” Fitzsimmons said. “I think this county is a Democratic County, and I think I’ve proved myself to be an outstanding county administrator, and I think the people will see that.”

Randall Terrell, political director for Equality Texas, said this week he wasn’t aware of any openly LGBT candidates who’ve filed to run in state races in 2010.

Although Texas made headlines recently for electing the nation’s first gay big-city mayor, the state remains one of 20 that lack an out legislator.

Denis Dison, a spokesman for the Victory Fund, said he’s hoping Annise Parker’s victory in Houston last week will inspire more qualified LGBT people to run for office.

“It gives other people permission really to think of themselves as leaders,” Dison said.

The filing period for March primaries ends Jan. 4.


This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition December 18, 2009.

—  admin