Dallas gets $1.28M HUD grant for HIV/AIDS

Officials with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development have announced the allocation of nearly $9 million in grants to projects in seven states that provide permanent and transitional housing and support services to people with HIV/AIDS.

Of that total, $1,287,500 will be allocated to the city of Dallas’ Housing and Community Services Department, the only city or agency in Texas to receive one of the seven HUD grants. The money will be used to provide transitional housing support to 60 ex-offenders over the next three years. According to the HUD press release, the Housing and Community Services Department will be working with the city’s Project Reconnect and the Department of Justice’s Second Chance Act in providing the housing and services.

And the city has committed to “creating an Integrated HIV/AIDS Housing Plan through a comprehensive community planning effort that involves 20 local partners operating in the eight county Dallas Metropolitan Statistical Area,” according to HUD. No word yet on whether those partners will include AIDS Services of Dallas, which is located in Oak Cliff and provides housing for as many as 225 men, women and children impacted by HIV/AIDS through 125 units in four complexes.

The largest of the grants, $1,375,000, is going to the Los Angeles County Commission on HIV. The city of Portland, Ore., gets the second-largest total with $1,365,900. River Region Human Services Inc. in Jacksonville, Fla., is getting $1,353,743, and the Corporation for AIDS Research Education and Services Inc. in Albany and Rochester, N.Y., gets $1,344,375.

Dallas is next on the list, followed by Justice Resource Institute Inc. in Boston, which gets $1,223,377. Rounding out the recipient list is the Frannie Peabody Center, a statewide organization in Maine, that is receiving $930,909.

The seven recipients were chosen “through a national HOPWA competition to identify special projects of national significance that will help advance understanding and improve the delivery of housing and care for persons with HIV,” according to HUD.

—  admin

Soldiers Impacted Under ‘DADT’ Accompany Lady Gaga to VMAs

Gaga

I snapped this screenshot a few minutes ago, as Lady Gaga appeared on the VMAs white carpet with the  Mike Almy, former U.S. Air Force Major discharged under the military's "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" policy; Stacy Vasquez, former U.S. Army Sgt. First Class discharged under DADT; Katie Miller, a top West Point cadet who resigned in August in protest to DADT; and David Hall, former U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. discharged under DADT.

Said  Aubrey Sarvis, Army veteran and executive director of Servicemembers Legal Defense Network about the appearance:

"Lady Gaga’s recognition of these fine patriots casts a spotlight on the unjust burden that ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’ imposes upon the brave men and women who defend our country every day, and further underscores why the Senate must swiftly act to get rid of this despicable law for good. With expected votes on the Senate floor later this month, advocates of open service still have time to contact both their senators and urge them to show support for all our veterans by voting to end DADT."

Lady Gaga tweeted: "Silks, fabrics, shoes + jewels, fashion dreams + breaking rules. Real heroes on my arm, tonight, is for us monsters, and our fight. X"

Upon accepting the award for Best Female Video for "Bad Romance", Gaga again drew attention to DADT, thanking the "discharged soldiers" (below) who came with her, adding, "And thank you to all the gays for remaking this video over and over again."

Watch clips, AFTER THE JUMP

Soldiers


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—  John Wright