Indigo Girls: The gay interview

 

Ray and Saliers, aka Indigo Girls

Marriage equality was a mere pipe dream when Indigo Girls duo Emily Saliers and Amy Ray came out in 1988, coinciding with the release of their eponymous Epic Records debut. There was no groundbreaking Ellen sitcom episode. Melissa Etheridge wasn’t formally out, and wouldn’t be until 1993, when she released Yes I Am. Within popular entertainment, particularly within the music business, Saliers and Ray were at the forefront of the queer rights movement. They won a Grammy and released chart-toppers like “Closer to Fine.” And they refused to let their sexuality get in the way of their success, brazenly being themselves at a time when being a gay public figure was uncommon and even downright scary.

In Friday’s print edition, we have an interview with Tony Award winner Billy Porter, so all this week, we decided to run interviews with other musicians who have taken an active role in art and politics.

We caught up with Saliers, 53, and Ray, 52, at the beginning of 2017, just days before Donald Trump would become our 45th president. The trailblazers talked about how music will unify despite the divisiveness of his administration, why “this is a really good time for artists to come to the forefront and stand up and be brave,” and their initial grade-school encounter that led to a devoted musical career and dear friendship spanning three decades.

Chris Azzopardi

Dallas Voice: You’re on the road fairly frequently. What keeps you touring as often as you do? Amy Ray: Every audience is different, so every experience is different, and I just think it’s good to get out there and play in front of people and keep that community… build it and keep it vibrant and have that exchange.

Emily Saliers: The demographic is more mixed now, and there are younger people who come to the shows. I don’t know how they find out about us, maybe their parents. Also, a lot of young women who are looking for bands that have a feminist reality about them. Self-empowered, self-worth, self-questioning — all those things that are all over our lyrics. Even though we’ve gotten much older, I don’t feel like the experience of going to one of our shows is like we’re just this old band that’s been around forever. It still feels new and fresh. I love it as much or more than I ever have.

Given the divisiveness of what’s happening politically, is building that sense of community more important now? Ray: It might be. I guess in some ways there are other levels where community is always important, because even when you have the best kind of administration and a president that you love, there are still pockets within our own country that need community and need that glue where there’s hard things going on, whether it’s different queer communities or Native American communities or communities of color that are disenfranchised in some way. But right now, it’s pretty daunting. There might be reversals that are negative environmentally and human rights-wise. I think it’s definitely a time to batten down the hatches and roll up the sleeves and start working.

What part do you think the arts, including music, will play in the political climate of Trump’s America? Ray: This is a really good time for artists to come to the forefront and stand up and be brave and make themselves known, and not be worried about alienating people with their art. Sometimes in the music community — still! — there are people who go, “Oh, we don’t want to rock the boat and alienate our audience.” But I feel like people are feeling less of that and more like, “Screw it.” I can see it happening around me with my friends even, who didn’t want to rock the boat, who might’ve been scared to alienate somebody in their audience. But now I think it’s like, “Well, what do we have to lose?”

Visual art and movies and theater right now are very important – music, also. Popular culture, like with Ellen, the original sitcom, for instance, really impacted people. It broadened a lot of people’s horizons, and Transparent does that as far as issues around queerness and trans issues and issues around Jewishness.

During Obama’s administration, there was, in a good way, a lot of permission given to all this really beautiful art to blossom, and I think that’s good because there’s this strong groundwork that’s been laid that just needs to continue happening well into the next administration. Art can really bring people together who might feel alienated from each other, like in my community. I live in a rural community where maybe 80 or 90 percent of the people voted for Trump, but I don’t really demonize people. I can’t go there ’cause they’re my neighbors, and I know them. I know them in their best moments. And I just try to understand where they’re coming from.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

This week’s takeaways: Life+Style

pam-2013-8

For tickets to Pam Ann, go here.

Indigo Girls, the lesbian folk band, plays at the McKinney Arts Center on Friday night, but there are lots of other gay-friendly things to do closer to downtown.

Also on Friday, photographer Alex Remington opens his one-man show of Dallas landmarks, Architectura, at the ilume Gallerie; it will play there through June. And Dallas ComicCon bursts into the Irving Convention Center in Las Colinas for a weekend of events.

On Saturday night, the Turtle Creek Chorale holds its annual Turtle Ball, this time at Trinity Groves, the new development near our fancy Calatrava bridge.

This is the last weekend to see Re-Designing Women at the Rose Room, as well as Fela! at the Winspear. And it’s your only chance to see Pam Ann, pictured, in her one-woman comedy act at the Majestic. But you still have time to catch Priscilla Queen of the Desert at Fair Park and the Dallas Theater Center’s Fly By Night at the Kalita.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Concert Notice: Indigo Girls and Janis Ian head to Dallas — but not together

While looking at the ol’ concert calendar, I noticed that a couple of major queer icons in music are headed this way. Better yet, they are performing in venues that should truly let them shine.

The Indigo Girls will play with the Dallas Symphony Orchestra on Aug. 29 at the Meyerson Symphony Center. I think that could be quite an interesting show seeing how the IG play such minimalist music. How do you add a whole symphony to “Watershed” or “Strange Fire” and still keep that distinct IG feel?

Tickets are $30–$105 and on sale now.

I had the pleasure of speaking to the legendary Janis Ian the last time she came to Dallas. Back in 2009, she performed a benefit show at the Rose Room. But this winter, she’ll perform at the Hamon Hall at the Winspear Opera House. Although I haven’t seen it yet on the ATTPAC calendar, but Ian has Dec. 8 (as does Pollstar) listed on her website as her day (or night) in Dallas. For tickets, stay tuned to the ATTPAC’s listing when it goes up.

Ian is most famous for her “At Seventeen” hit, but did you know the folk star dabbled in disco? Watch the video of “Fly Too High” after the jump.

—  Rich Lopez

Bob Mould gets in on Undercover 2011

I’m digging how they gays are representing (even if by accident) in  A.V. Club’s Undercover 2011 project. In June, I posted this item where bands covered George Michael and the Indigo Girls. Last week, Bob Mould jumped in and covered, well, himself. He performed “If I Can’t Change Your Mind” by his old band Sugar. Watch it here.

Mould has major cred with Sugar and his first band Husker Du. He still rocks it solo, but you might recall he’s also one-half of Blowout, the DJ team that served up the music at this year’s BearDance.

And if you just want a little more Mould, check out the great interview he did on Sound Opinions last month.

—  Rich Lopez

George Michael, Indigo Girls get some cover love from A.V. Club and guests

Michael gets beard props from Iron & Wine singer Sam Beam.

A.V. Club’s Undercover bit is a clever one. Readers pick songs and bands come in to play them. In Undercover 2, we’re treated to an experimental rock version of Kanye West’s “Runaway” or a re-working of ’80s synth-poppers Human League. Interestingly enough, the two LGBTs on the list appeared with some rule-bending.

In A.V.’s post from Thursday, And You Will Know Us By The Trail of the Dead covered Indigo Girls’ “Blood and Fire,” which wasn’t on the original list. Apparently they “didn’t understand the rules.” Yeah, whatever, but it’s a worthy watch …

—  Rich Lopez

Galaxy quest

GalaxyWith musical superstars heading this way, we look to the skies for answers

RICH LOPEZ  | Staff Writer
lopez@dallasvoice.com

The gays are not without major music options as five big acts all head to town. From the mainstream pop of Kylie to the lesbi-rock of Brandi Carlile, and lots in between, it might be tough to navigate through the slew of music stars retrograding Dallas. Thus we searched for celestial advice on how to find our way through the asteroids and harmonies on which shows to consider.

The moon: Brandi Carlile

Although 2004 was the year Carlile broke into the music industry, it was her sophomore album that proved she’s no slump. For a newer artist, 2007’s The Story was like her Born to Run, featuring some big names behind it with T-Bone Burnett producing and a collab with the Indigo Girls. Carlile remained just as hot and 2009’s Give Up the Ghost did not disappoint. She worked with star producer Rick Rubin and offered another gay pairing with Elton John on “Caroline.”

With her show at the Granada, she’ll appear just as close as a full moon and likely shining as bright. Carlile has not made a career misstep so far and people are recognizing now how huge she could easily become. But the show is sold out so if you don’t have tickets already, make other plans. Your house is clearly not in her plane.

Appearing with Ivan an Alyosha.

Granada Theater, 3524 Greenville Ave. May 16 at 8 p.m. $29. GranadaTheater.com.

Mars alignment :
Bruno Mars and Janelle Monae

Despite the obvious, the celestial advisors have told us that Mars is the perfect place for these two. With eccentricity oozing out of their pores, they also have the talent to back it up, proving that on their Hooligans in Wondaland Tour.

Monae is probably the smaller of the two stars, but her Archandroid album was a brilliant musical high point and her energetic live performance is a spectacle beautiful to behold. Did you see her at the Granada with Of Montreal last November? Killer.

Bruno Mars is more of an anomaly. Although he’s doing the hipster throwback version of old soul acts, his songs from his debut Doo-Wops & Hooligans have minimal impact. The kid is talented and his multi-instrumentalism should be respected, but where Monae will likely leave you wanting more, Mars may too — more Monae.

Appearing with Patrick Stump.

Verizon Theatre, 1001 Performance Place, Grand Prairie. May 17 at 7 p.m. $35. Ticketmaster.com.

The sun:
Kylie Minogue with DJ Erik Thoresen

When this show was announced, there was a collective squeal from the gays. Minogue has never been Madonna or Britney, but she’s built a following that rivals both. Last year’s Aphrodite also took her to new heights musically. A solid package of pop and dance confections, Minogue reminds us that she is a star.

Her concerts have a reputation of being visual spectacles as well that apparently rival the likes of some Cirque du Soleil shows. That alone is worth the ticket.

Station 4 DJ Erik Thoresen was tapped to be the opening entertainment so this big pop-stravaganza also has big time local ties.  Without a doubt, this is the party of the week, if not the concert.

Verizon Theatre, 1001 Performance Place, Grand Prairie. May 18 at 8 p.m. $50–$125. Ticketmaster.com.

House of Uranus: Of Montreal

While Of Montreal is too smart to be considered a party band, their brand of indie dance music is something more than infectious. The high energy and trippy lyrics get into your soul and skin and turn you into a dancing monster.

Maybe Monae has moved on, but OM is perfect for the mid-sized venue. Imagine a packed house and sweaty dancing bodies. Singer Kevin Barnes should put on quite a physical show.  We love when he gets all sexy and dirty, but we’re just sorry he has to compete with Kylie for attention. That’s like Sophie’s choice. No fair.

Appearing with Painted Palms.

South Side Music Hall, 1135 S. Lamar St. May 18. Doors at 7:30 p.m. $20. GilleysMusic.com

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition May 13, 2011.

 

—  Kevin Thomas

Christmas jukebox

Indigo Girls, Fred Schneider queer up the holidays, but Annie Lennox transforms them with carolful CDs

RICH LOPEZ  | Staff Writer lopez@dallasvoice.com

3.5 stars
HAPPY HOLLY DAYS

Indigo Girls
Vanguard

It took decades in the music business before the famed lesbian duo Indigo Girls got around to releasing their first holiday album. Holly Happy Days puts Amy Ray and Emily Saliers in country mode with hoe-down ready songs and a star-studded roster. They could have very well created a lesbian music lover’s wet dream in disc format.

They giddy-up quick with “I Feel the Christmas Spirit,” a ramblin’ tune that leaves out any jingling bells. The fiddle and banjo are the stars in this happy song that doesn’t sound anything like holiday fare —unless you’re in A Very Special Deliverance Christmas.

That same approach makes the traditional carols interesting at least. Neither sings that kind of vocal stretch you’ve come to expect hearing on “O Holy Night” … and thank goodness. There’s no vanity here — “Night” may come off underwhelming, but its Celtic undertones add welcome texture.

Because they respect the carols’ original structures, there aren’t many surprises. That’s made forgivable with easy-to-sing-along numbers like “I’ll Be Home for Christmas.” Who doesn’t want that? The organ backdrop, though, on “Angels We Have Heard On High” feels like you walked in on an old hillbilly church with a two-voice chorus. There’s a charming majesty in the tune along with the layered instrumentation.

Not to discriminate, the Girls cover Woody Guthrie’s “Happy Joyous Hanukah” which almost had me run out to buy a dreidel. The bluegrass influence here is adorable, and despite its minority status, it fits right into the rest of the album. Mary Gaultier and Janis Ian even provide gorgeous background vocals.

They go pop with “It Really Is (A Wonderful Life),” a bouncy song penned by Chely Wright. You almost expect to hear it as a commercial jingle or sitcom theme, but it charms in a way you don’t expect.

For die-hards, Happy Holly Days is Indigo Girls doing what they do best: Acoustic folk (although revved up) and lush harmonies. The non-fan might initially be put off by the woodsy flavor and lack of fuzzy feelings, but with time, their simple approach is refreshing and they prove that less can be more. Besides, the Indigo Girls offer three ornaments in the packaging. Score!
……………………………….

1.5 stars
DESTINATION … CHRISTMAS!

The Superions
Fanatic

When Fred Schneider branches out from The B-52’s with his side project The Superions to take on Christmas, well, you might as well throw any possible idea you have about holiday music out the window. Schneider and company don’t hold back from turning Christmas on its ear and into a hilarious party on Destination…Christmas! Just try singing these door-to-door without being chased by angry villagers carrying pitchforks.

They get the party started with “Santa’s Disco,” an over-synthesized dance dittie about all the revelry at the North Pole. Christmas Carol cuts loose / Crazy as a goose / It’s so insane / What she does with a candy cane. This alone should paint all the picture you need to see the band’s approach to the season. The “Santa’s Disco” chant gets a little much, but seriously, this is fun stuff.

When the first line is “Whatchu makin? / Fruitcake” in, um, “Fruitcake,” you expect hilarity to ensue. Instead, it’s basically the recipe set to music and as the second track, missteps already   show on the album. The techno beat is engaging, but this song proves early on that this shtick could get old fast.

TROUBLESOME TRIO | Fred Schneider, center, and his side project The Superions should expect a lot of coal for their ‘Destination … Christmas!’ album

It does. The same mistakes happen on “Chillin’ at Christmas” and “Teddy and Betty Yeti.” Schneider opts to talk over great beats, but the stories are not even ridiculous, just, well, stupid. I’m not really sure what he’s trying to do here: Fun is one thing, funny is another, but either he’s trying too hard to be “out there” … or maybe he just doesn’t know what he’s doing. Maybe I just don’t get it, but maybe there’s nothing to get.

There is some redemption in the “Christmas Conga (Jungle Bells).” The ju-ju-ju-jungle bells lyrics and the conga beat are irresistible, with more of Schneider’s talk-singing. The goofiness here is what he should have been doing all over the album.

The production puts Schneider’s voice front and center, which isn’t a good thing. I don’t think I ever realized how bad a singer he is; perhaps neither does he. He’s much better doing the outlandish vocals as he perfected on “Rock Lobster” and “Love Shack.” Side projects can allow for artists to change up their sound, but Schneider is so bad here, you start feeling sorry for the rest of the band having to endure it.

And yet somehow, it ends on a high note with “Santa Je T’aime.” An orgasmic fan moans for Santa Claus as he bellows ho ho ho. Think the holiday version of Lil Louis’ “French Kiss” with that climaxing groan.

Even for fans of quirky and out of the box, Destination…Christmas! remains an unworthy purchase. You’re better off selecting the songs you like and buying individually online.

………………………………..

4.5 stars
A CHRISTMAS CORNUCOPIA

Annie Lennox
Decca

On the opposite end of the spectrum from The Superions is Annie Lennox’s holiday release. Filled with sophistication and heart, A Christmas Cornucopia could be the holiday album this season. With carols most everyone has heard to those she sang as a child, the CD is crisp and festive.

Where we seem to have gotten a softer, kinder Lennox in her solo career, her intensity here actually reminds of how powerful the Eurythmics were in the beginning. “Angels We Have Heard On High” is a beautiful choral piece that bursts with glorious force. Where the Indigo Girls are intimate on this carol, Lennox pushes her voice with abundant strength. She continues that on “God Rest Ye Merry Gentleman;” both solidly open the album.

ELEGANT HOLIDAY | Annie Lennox makes Santa’s nice list with her gorgeous CD ‘A Christmas Cornucopia.’

Lennox mixes Middle Eastern, European and African influences with ease. She may not sound completely genuine with the French carol “Il Est Ne Le Divin Enfant,” but her earnestness comes across sweetly. Her Middle Eastern touch on “Gentleman” only kicks the carol into a higher gear without stripping away its originality.

Lennox worked with the African Children’s Choir on “Lullay Lullay (Coventry Carol),” a song about the Nativity that is the album’s darkest moment. She compares the song’s message about King Herod’s slaughter of the first-born son to the plight of children in Africa. The tone turns into a borderline buzzkill but she refrains from going too heavy. Still, it’s a shift.

She includes one original song. “Universal Child” finishes the album off with a heartfelt ribbon that ties it up well, though is not especially Christmasy. The advocate work she’s done with children and women in Africa comes out in song here and it’s a gentle touch. (Proceeds from the song go to her foundation to help those communities.)

Lennox delivers wonderfully and producer Mike Stevens succeeds in showcasing both her voice and the different flavors of music and instrumentation. Like the present that’s well wrapped and heavy when you pick it up, A Christmas Cornucopia is a worthwhile one to open.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition November 26, 2010.

—  Michael Stephens

Coco Rosie performs tonight with Sleep Whale at the Granada Theater

Indie duo goes only half drag

Coco RosieWhat the Indigo Girls are to traditional folk, Coco Rosie would perhaps be the antithesis. The avante-garde popsters are also sisters with one heckuva back story. Vision quests, traveling childhoods and even loss of contact for a number of years, Bianca “Coco” and Sierra “Rosie” Casady reunited and began their musical endeavor. They are on the road supporting their fourth full-length album, Grey Oceans.

Younger sister Bianca told AfterEllen she’s surprised people don’t realize she’s lesbian. Like, really surprised.

“I am surprised, to tell you the truth, that people don’t talk about it more,” Bianca said of her being queer. “Maybe we are still living in such a homophobic culture that people [who] like me don’t want to hear about it.”

She even performs in drag. And with the band’s frequent use pf children’s toys as musical instruments (along with piano and guitars) to make what they call their “freak folk” music, this could be some show to watch.

DEETS: With Sleep Whale. Granada Theater, 3524 Greenville Ave. 8 p.m. $18. GranadaTheater.com.

—  Rich Lopez

Concert Notice: Coco Rosie brings their ‘freak folk’ to Dallas’ Granada Theater Sept. 29

What the Indigo Girls are to traditional folk, Coco Rosie would perhaps be the antithesis. The avante-garde popsters are also sisters with one heckuva back story. Vision quests, traveling childhoods and even loss of contact for a number of years, Bianca “Coco” and Sierra “Rosie” Casady reunited and began their musical endeavor. They are on the road supporting their fourth full-length album, Grey Oceans.

Younger sister Bianca told AfterEllen she’s surprised people don’t realize she’s lesbian. Like, really surprised.

“I am surprised, to tell you the truth, that people don’t talk about it more,” Bianca said of her being queer. “Maybe we are still living in such a homophobic culture that people [who] like me don’t want to hear about it.”

She even performs in drag. And with the band’s frequent use pf children’s toys as musical instruments (along with piano and guitars) to make what they call their “freak folk” music, I imagine this could be some show to watch.

Coco Rosie performs Sept. 29 at the Granada Theater. Tickets are $18 and can be purchased here. Check out “Noah’s Ark” below for a musical sampling.

—  Rich Lopez

Concert notice: Indigo Girls play HOB in May

The Indigo Girls are back on the road in support of their 2009 double CD, Poseidon and the Bitter Bug. They’ve forgone the major label route and released Bug on their own indie label, IG Recordings. So it looks like they’ve come full circle since their lauded 1987 indie debut, Strange Fire.

They don’t go for a lot of drama onstage but like their younger lesbian counterparts, Tegan and Sara, they are likely to deliver a quality show. Although, we kinda dug the retro feel of their show last year at the Lakewood (below).

The Indigo Girls play at House of Blues, May 28 at 9 p.m. Tickets on sale now.заказать копирайтинг киевпопулярность запросов google

—  Rich Lopez