Deaths

Robert  Allan Turnipseed, 62, formerly of Dallas, was murdered in his home at Riberas del Pilar in Jalisco, Mexico, on Jan. 6 (See related news story in this issue.)

Turnipseed immigrated to the United States from Calgary, Alberta in Canada as a child and grew up in the Dallas-Fort Worth area. He was active in the Stonewall Business and Professional Association in Dallas, a precursor to the North Texas GLBT Chamber of Commerce. He and his partner fulfilled their dream of moving to Mexico in 2004 when they bought a home in the Lake Chapala area.

Turnipseed is survived by his partner of 40 years, Bob Tennison.

Mark A. Bieson, 48, died Jan. 10 at Parkland Hospital in Dallas following a prolonged illness.

Born in Indiana, Biesen had lived in the Dallas area for the past 16-plus years and had worked as a demo specialist at Whole Foods Market in Highland Park. Friends remember him as a very kind and gentle person with an amazing spirit. Guests to and his coworkers at Whole Foods Market loved him very much and will remember him always for his sense of humor and good-natured spirit.

Biesen is survived by one sister and two brothers, all of Indiana.

A memorial service is set for 2 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 29, at Unity Church of Dallas, 6525 Forest Lane.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition Jan. 28, 2011.

—  John Wright

‘Pain’ in the asking

A curmudgeonly man, bespectacled in a plain black suit and bare feet like Yves St. Laurent at the beach, thumbs through a dictionary in the dark, telling stories that go nowhere. He’s a contrarian, obviously the survivor of a troubled past, but not really equipped to explain it. This is us, he tells the audience directly, interacting “face to face with the modern mind.” God, I hope not.

The absurdism that is Thom Pain (Based on Nothing) is smart (almost too smart), and it challenges you in assaultive but funny ways, with lots of word play amid the fatalistic rants. I’m not sure where it’s headed — absurdist plays are often unfathomable that way — but I do know that Steven Walters is the actor to lead us there.

His modulation of energy as he relates stories — about a dead dog, about anger and fear and relationships — it what can sustain you for 70 minutes of one voice talking to you on a mostly black stage. This show marks Second Thought Theatre’s artistic reboot; it’s a good way to begin.

— Arnold Wayne Jones

Through Jan. 29 at Addison Theatre Centre. SecondThoughtTheatre.org.

—  John Wright

Concert Notice: Sugar & Gold to play free show at Jack Daniel’s Saloon

I came across this by sheer luck, but the very gay Sugar & Gold headlines a free concert this month at the Jack Daniels Saloon in the Gilley’s Music Complex. The San Francisco based band were last seen in these parts last June when they played Dan’s Silverleaf in Denton. I’m so glad they’ll be closer this time.

S&G follow in that same pop dance vein as Of Montreal and Scissor Sisters, but falls more into the “little brother” category of those bands — or should we say “little sister?” Reprising a late ’80s/early ’90s touch to their disco music, their sound isn’t so much challenging as it is kinda irresistible. Try not to enjoy their video below for “Stay Soft,” filled with a throwback of color explosion and kaleidoscopic imagery. Ridiculous, sure – fun, hell yeah.

Yip Deceiver and DJ Trademarx open the show. The show is scheduled for Jan. 29 and it’s free. Free I say. How can you beat that? It might get Guerilla Gay Bar up in Jack Daniel’s that night. Hope they’re ready for it. Doors at 8 p.m.

—  Rich Lopez