Out & Equal conference coming to Dallas in October

In working to create inclusive and non-discriminating workplaces, Out & Equal provides resources to companies and individuals to achieve its goal. The nonprofit makes a big splash in Dallas by bringing its 2011 Workplace Summit to the area Oct. 25–28.

Through workshops and panels, professionals in diversity initiatives, human resources and more will share their practices and strategies in having, literally, an out and equal work environment.

Here is a sampling of what will be offered throughout the event:

Leadership seminars set for the summit include “Developing a Strong LGBT Ally Program,” hosted by Dr. David M. Hall, author of Allies at Work: Creating a Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Inclusive Work Environment. Another scheduled session will be “Implementing Transgender Inclusion: Comprehensive Programming to Ensure Workplace Equality,” with Ann Dunkin and Jamison Green.

A-list plenary speakers include Bravo’s senior vice president of original programming and development, Andy Cohen, and transgender actress Candis Cayne on Tuesday and the recently out actress Meredith Baxter speaking on Wednesday.

The Gala Dinner is just as star-studded, with appearances by comedians Margaret Cho and Kate Clinton and actor Wilson Cruz along with remarks by Hewlett-Packard President Leo Apotheker and Fort Worth councilman Joel Burns.

With more than 140 workshops planned, Out & Equal expects more 2,500 to attend. To register for the summit, visit OutAndEqual.org.

— Rich Lopez

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition September 2, 2011.

—  Michael Stephens

Savagely better

BETTER ALL THE TIME | Dan Savage, right, and his partner Terry Miller offered a helping voice for LGBT youth during a rash of suicides with the ‘It Gets Better’ campaign. The campaign has grown that the couple has turned it into a book. Savage comes to Dallas to talk up the book and likely, some sex.

Giving advice on sex or telling LGBT youth it gets better, people listen to Dan Savage

Sex advice guru Dan Savage — whose column/podcast/iPhone-iPod app Savage Love has made him the queer Dear Abby — founded and launched the It Gets Better Project (ItGetsBetter.org) in September 2010 with husband Terry Miller via its first YouTube video. At the time, he never expected that it would go as far as it has in sheer numbers (10,000-plus and counting) and input from across the globe and social strata: President Obama’s video went up just a month later, and Fort Worth Councilman Joel Burns was attributed with expanding the cause when his (unrelated) heartfelt confessional went viral.

Now the book companion, It Gets Better: Coming Out, Overcoming Bullying, and Creating a Life Worth Living (Dutton; $21.95), edited by Savage and Miller, drops, featuring all-new essays by the likes of David Sedaris, Kate Clinton, Michael Cunningham and Alison Bechdel, as well as video transcriptions and expanded essays from high-profile personalities and everyday folks alike.

Savage, who serves as editorial director for Seattle’s The Stranger weekly and recently shot a TV series pilot for MTV (he’s awaiting word on whether it’s being picked up), spoke about the book, where he turns for advice, and the next social-sexual mission on his agenda.

— Lawrence Ferber


Dallas Voice: How does this book further the It Gets Better mission and message? Dan Savage: The book includes pieces from people who haven’t made videos. It also creates another way for kids who need to hear these messages to find them. I’ve written books before, and you never really know where a book is going to wind up. Sometimes they wind up in school libraries; I’ve gotten notes from people who stumbled across my book The Kid in the Himalayas. The Internet has tremendous reach, of course, and kids are wired and tech savvy, but not all kids have access to the Internet and not all kids want to leave a browser history that might incriminate them. So this gives another way to reach a lot of kids.

Who would you like to see contribute an It Gets Better video or message but hasn’t yet? I would love for the prime minister of Canada, Stephen Harper, to make one. I would like to see — and am not surprised we have not seen — a video from a prominent Republican elected official. There has been not one. I wish every politician would make one.

Look at New York Mayor Mike Bloomberg. He made a video where he said we welcome everybody — LGBT youth have a home in New York if where you’re at is not welcoming you. At the same time that he released that video, he slashed funding for the Ali Forney Center, which is a shelter for LGBT teens, and he was called out for his hypocrisy. People were able to use the video to shame him and he reversed [his decision] and re-funded the center. So calling in these chits, and being able to hold the people to the promises they made in their videos, is valuable.

That said, for me the most important videos are the ones from people no one’s ever heard of — average, everyday LGBT folks reaching out and sharing their joy with LGBT kids who may be having trouble picturing a future for themselves. Queer kids know there are gay celebrities out there, and straight celebs and politicians who are fine with gay people, but what some of them are having trouble picturing is how they get from being a bullied, miserable 14-year-old gay kid whose family is also tormenting them to a happy, secure, loved and perhaps, reconciled with their family gay adult.

What are the next steps in It Gets Better’s future? There’s a good body of videos and we want to archive and tag them so they’re more easily searched. There are a lot by trans people, but you can’t always tell which just by looking at the thumbnail images, so we would need to make them easier to break out into playlists and search. We’re working on that now. The mission after that is to make sure that five to 10 years from now, once this moment of such intense media interest has passed, that kids who are 5 today and going to be 15 then and don’t know about the website can find their way there. We have to make sure that there is enough money raised to host and maintain the website and awareness about it in schools and where kids are at.

As a sex advice columnist, who do you look to or read for sex advice? I read a lot of sex columns. I like In & Out, Caroline Hax, Dear Prudence, Margo Howard. If you go to TheStranger.com/Savage, there’s a blogroll called “Want a Second Opinion?” which is links to other columns I approve of and enjoy.

So what is the one issue when it comes to our sex lives that you have made your number one mission to change through your work? I just want people to be more realistic about monogamy. People’s expectations about what a long-term relationships is like are so in conflict with what LTRs are actually like that a lot of decent, fine, functional relationships have ended because people had irrational expectations. If we can change expectations we can save a lot of relationships. Life-long sexual monogamy and the expectation that an LTR is always going to be this extraordinarily passionate fuck-fest sets us all up for disappointment.

And is there one strategy you are taking to go about that? It’s an issue that constantly comes up. Sexual dissatisfaction, mismatched libidos, unmet sexual needs, people being cut off sexually by their spouses after they have children. I’m in the position often of recommending what I describe as “the least worst option.” I think if the choice is a nasty divorce that upends the lives of four to five people and family or a little discreet infidelity that makes it possible for that family to remain intact and otherwise completely functional, I’m for infidelity.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition March 25, 2011.

—  John Wright

White House gate-crasher Michaele Salahi to appear on 'Real Housewives of D.C.'

Kate Clinton at Creating Change 2010
Kate Clinton

Bravo announced that Michaele Salahi, the White House state dinner gate-crasher, will be one of the “Real Housewives of D.C.

The Salahis arrived at the White House in a Hummer with camera rolling. Directly in front of them were Kate Clinton and Urvishi Vaid.

I interviewed Clinton before the Creating Change conference that was held in Dallas in February.

The state dinner was in honor of the Indian prime minister. Vaid was born in India.

Clinton said they got in the receiving line. Vaid, the former executive director of the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force, shook President Obama’s hand first.

Vaid said, “We appreciate what you are trying to do for the LGBT community, but you’ve got to be harder on the Republicans.”

—  David Taffet

Scenes from Creating Change

Census

Encouraging the LGBT community to be counted in the census

Sue

Conference director Sue Hyde

Grace

Transgender activist Grace Sterling Stowell received the Sue J. Hyde Activism Award for Longevity in the Movement.

Kate

Comedian Kate Clinton is serving as Mistress of Ceremonies for the plenary sessions

—  David Taffet