Former Indiana State Rep. Laments His Vote Against Gay Marriage

Indianapostcard With conservatives back in control of Indiana's government, marriage equality and civil unions are again on the chopping block.

Just this week an Indiana House committee approved a law that would not only explicitly ban same-sex marriage, but also civil unions, despite the fact that Indiana lawmakers have already passed a law defining marriage as between a man and a woman, and prohibit civil unions.

As lawmakers consider this new law, a Democrat who voted for a similar law that ultimately failed, former State Rep. Dave Crooks, has penned an op-ed describing that vote as his "worst."

I believe the worst vote I ever cast was to amend the Indiana Constitution to ban gay marriage and civil unions. I cast the vote for my own political reasons. Many people told me a “no” vote could cost me re-election and would upset the majority of the people I represented.

I fear the amendment, once on the ballot, will create more hate against lesbians and homosexuals. I also believe it will hurt our economy. Indiana employers who attempt to attract the best employees from across the nation and around the globe will discover many potential employees will say no to our state and take their talents and skills elsewhere. Gay entrepreneurs with money to invest will likely take their investments to a more tolerant state.

Crooks explains that though he's "not an advocate for same-sex marriage," he does believe the potential legislation "goes too far."

"Indiana already has a ban against same-sex marriage… There is no reason to ban both same-sex marriage and civil unions," he says. "The bottom line for me: Lawmakers should never use our precious constitution to take away rights from any of our citizens." While Crooks' comments are compelling, inaction on the current law also tarnishes the violation: without overturning the "traditional," legalized definition of marriage, there can be no true progress for gay people or the state of Indiana.

Read Crooks' entire letter, AFTER THE JUMP

From The Indianapolis Star:

I served 12 years in the Indiana General Assembly as a state representative from 1996-2008. I cast thousands of votes during my legislative career. However, I believe the worst vote I ever cast was to amend the Indiana Constitution to ban gay marriage and civil unions. I cast the vote for my own political reasons. Many people told me a “no” vote could cost me re-election and would upset the majority of the people I represented. The amendment eventually died in committee the following session and never reached the ballot for voter approval.

Let’s face it. Indiana already has a ban against same-sex marriage. The law has held for several years. However, Republicans who now control all of state government are hell-bent on passing the amendment. These so-called conservatives can’t wait to tamper with our constitution. Many Democrats who once faced the fear I did as a legislator will likely join them.

I fear the amendment, once on the ballot, will create more hate against lesbians and homosexuals. I also believe it will hurt our economy. Indiana employers who attempt to attract the best employees from across the nation and around the globe will discover many potential employees will say no to our state and take their talents and skills elsewhere. Gay entrepreneurs with money to invest will likely take their investments to a more tolerant state.

I’m not an advocate for same-sex marriage. However, I believe the amendment goes too far. There is no reason to ban both same-sex marriage and civil unions. The bottom line for me: Lawmakers should never use our precious constitution to take away rights from any of our citizens.


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—  David Taffet

Sec Def Gates laments that Congress likely won’t repeal DADT this year

STFU. I’ve seriously had enough of that idiot. It’s his fault that we’re still even talking about DADT, because he wanted a study, and he wanted the study to be finished AFTER the elections, blah blah blah. And the President gave in to every single demand. And now, Gates is lamenting that Congress – get that, CONGRESS – may stop DADT from being repealed.

Spare us the crocodile tears.

If this DADT compromise isn’t passed in the next few weeks, it’s all going to be on Barack Obama’s head for deciding to wait until 2010, and then deciding to cave to his Secretary of Defense over and over again.

As I mention below, Senator Reid has his own share of blame in this ongoing fiasco (as do HRC and all of the apologists). But in the end, repeal of DADT was one man’s promise, the President’s. And it’s increasingly looking like he blew it again.




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—  admin