One more case of how “the gays are destroying traditional marriage”

Reports out this week indicate that a record low number of people are getting married. Only about 51 percent of U.S. adults are married — a new low.

Of course “traditional” marriage advocates would blame the gays for destroying marriage as it has been known since Biblical times. But maybe straight people are destroying marriage all by themselves.

Take the case of Bill Johnson. He ran for governor of Alabama in 2010 on a platform opposing same-sex marriage. Yes, Johnson was very worried that his progressive state was going to be among the first to offer marriage equality. Johnson is married and his wife had three children through a previous marriage. She apparently likes marriage so much that she’s done it multiple times. But she had a hysterectomy and according to a report in the New York Daily News, he knew she would want him to help others have children. So over the past year, he’s been a sperm donor to at least nine lesbian couples.

Oh, and he forgot to tell her. And she found out. And she’s pissed. So pissed it might just ruin their traditional marriage — between one man, one woman and nine lesbian couples.

Yep. Just another case of how the gays are destroying traditional marriage as it’s existed since Biblical times.

—  David Taffet

Nevada gay households up by 87 percent

CRISTINA SILVA  |  Associated Press

LAS VEGAS — The number of same-sex couples sharing a home in Nevada nearly doubled from 2000 to 2010, revealing a budding constituency in a state where voters have banned gay marriage, but embraced domestic partnerships.

Nearly 4,600 homes in Nevada were headed by lesbian couples at the end of the last decade, according to Census data released last week, while 4,724 households were headed by two male partners. The data shows that the number of gay and lesbian households in Nevada jumped 87 percent during the last decade, and about a quarter of those couples are raising children. Lesbian couples were more likely than the male couples to have children at home.

In all, Nevada had more than 9,000 households led by same-sex couples in 2010, up from fewer than 5,000 such households counted in 2000.

To be sure, same-sex couples living together remained a minuscule population among Nevada’s more than a million households. But their swelling ranks reflect Nevada’s increasingly gay friendly stance less than a decade after 67 percent of the state’s voters defined marriage as “between a male and female person.”

“Folks who are LGBT may not have been excited (before) to move here from, say California, where they enjoy a lot of legal protections,” said Michael Ginsburg, southern Nevada director for the Progressive Leadership Alliance of Nevada. “Now that Nevada is catching up, that may not be a factor for people anymore.”

It’s also possible some of the new same-sex households reflect an increased willingness among gay couples to come out to the government, rather than actual growth. The Census doesn’t capture the overall gay population in Nevada, because it doesn’t allow single people to identify their sexual orientation.

Gay activists insist Nevada is home to many more gay couples who cohabitate, and that the 2010 Census numbers only reflect people who were comfortable identifying themselves as gay to Census takers.

“Are there even more? Absolutely,” said Candice Nichols, executive director for The Gay & Lesbian Community Center of Southern Nevada. “I don’t think it’s a clear cut view of how many same sex households there are actually are in Nevada. People don’t identify for various reasons, it just depends on their own comfort levels.”

Ginsburg said he couldn’t recall if he or his live-in partner had confirmed that they were a couple to the Census. He wondered if gay couples were not coming out to the federal government because the survey does not allow unmarried participants to identify themselves by specific terms, such as transgender or domestic partners. The questionnaire asks homeowners to identify the people sharing their roof under specific familiar categories, such as child, parent or spouse. Couples who live together but are not married may only self-identify themselves as an unmarried partner.

“You could look at those Census numbers and say, ‘Wow, there are no gay people in this state,’ which is laughable,” Ginsburg said.

The Las Vegas Valley, where most of the state’s 2.6 million people live, is home to the majority of Nevada’s same-sex households.

As with many states, Nevada has become more gay friendly in recent years, passing local and state laws recognizing the rights of domestic partners. The state Legislature passed a law recognizing domestic partners in 2009, but only after then Republican Gov Jim Gibbons vetoed it. State leaders went further this year, passing a series of laws that extended discrimination protections to transgender people and prohibited housing or employment discrimination based on sexual orientation. Casino executives, the state’s business elite, have supported the pro-equality measures.

Still, overturning a gay marriage ban passed by Nevada voters in 2002 could take years because of the state’s complicated constitutional amendment process.

Nichols said marriage equality proponents in Nevada agree their best option is to wait for the federal government to recognize gay marriage.

“It’s going to be much easier for the states to say, ‘Wait a minute, the federal government finds this unconstitutional,”’ she said.

—  John Wright

Church finds minister guilty for marrying gays

LISA LEFF  |  Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO — A retired Presbyterian minister was found guilty of misconduct Friday, Aug. 27 by a church court for officiating the weddings of 16 gay couples when same-sex marriage was legal in California.

A regional commission of the Presbyterian Church (USA) ruled 4-2 that the Rev. Jane Spahr of San Francisco “persisted in a pattern or practice of disobedience” by performing the weddings in 2008 before Proposition 8 banned the unions in the state.

The church’s highest court has held that Presbyterian ministers may bless same-sex unions as long as they do “not state, imply, or represent that a same-sex ceremony is a marriage.”

By willfully challenging that holding, Spahr broke her ordination vows, the commission said in its majority opinion.

At the same time, however, the tribunal devoted most of its 21/2-page ruling to praising the 68-year-old pastor, a lesbian who founded a church group in the early 1990s for gay Presbyterians.

Spahr was acknowledged “for her prophetic ministry” and “faithful compassion. The commissioners called on the broader church to use her example “to re-examine our own fear and ignorance.”

The six-member commission representing 54 Northern California churches censured Spahr with a rebuke as punishment. Spahr said she was disappointed by the verdict and would appeal to a midlevel church court.

It was the second time the regional Presbytery of the Redwoods convened a court to consider charges against Spahr for sanctioning same-sex relationships.

In 2006, a church court composed of different members ruled that she had acted within her rights as an ordained minister when she married two lesbian couples in 2004 and 2005.

—  John Wright