Wisconsin’s got bigger nuts than Texas

Rebecca Kleefisch

Wisconsin is generally considered a liberal state. Milwaukee is the only city in the country that ever elected a socialist city government. Their senior senator, Russ Feingold, is one of the most liberal members of the Senate.

But like in New York, this election year has brought out Wisconsin’s right-wing crazies.

Here’s some current news on Wisconsin Republican candidates, proving — yet again — that Texas Republicans are downright mainstream and boring.

Rebecca Kleefisch didn’t mean to sound insensitive when she compared same-sex marriage to marrying a table.

The former local TV news anchor (surprisingly for ABC, not Fox) is running on the Republican ticket for lieutenant governor of Wisconsin.

She said was talking about the state’s domestic partnership law that offers same-sex couples hospital visitation rights and estate planning rights.

She said the state can’t afford to just hand out money to anyone.

She didn’t explain how visiting someone in the hospital and helping to care for that person costs the state money. Or how probating a will that is not contested in court costs more than a legal fight between a partner and a family that won’t recognize the relationship. Seems like it’s her way that costs the state big bucks.

Well, she’s sorry. She’s still against marriage equality, not that Wisconsin offers marriage equality. Please vote for her.

Jennifer London is running for Wisconsin’s 4th Congressional District. Her solution to the Social Security problem is to back all of the trust fund’s savings with gold.

The Great Lakes are her environmental concern. To save them, she would close the St. Lawrence Seaway. No word on how she’d do that beyond her proposed legislation since the St. Lawrence is in Canada. War?

Then there’s Apostle David King, founder of the Milwaukee God Squad and Republican candidate for Wisconsin Secretary of State.

Charlette Harris filed a civil lawsuit today against King.

Harris, a lesbian, is accusing King of getting her drunk and getting her pregnant. She says they had lunch on Aug. 26. After he got her drunk, he took her to his home where she was too drunk to consent to sex, according to the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.

The paper reports King first suggested Harris get an abortion and then suggested his wife go with her for her ultrasound. I may not know much about heterosexual relationships, but even if this wasn’t rape, isn’t it odd for the adulterer to get his wife involved?

For the record, no apostles are on the ballot in Texas. No proposals to shut down the Rio Grande to deal with immigration or the environment. No real nutjobs to really make us proud. With all the crazies out there, I’m a little jealous that we don’t have our share.

—  David Taffet

Gay University Park dad rejected by Boy Scouts says he’ll appear on local newscasts tonight

Jon Langbert, the gay father who’s been told he can’t be a leader in his 9-year-old son’s Cub Scout troop in University Park, reports that his story will be on three local TV news broadcasts tonight.

“Watch Fox (KDFW-4) at 9 and ABC (WFAA-8) and CBS (KTVT/KTXA-21) news at 10. I hope the reporters ask the Boy Scouts what they want me to tell Carter when he asks why they’re saying his father is a bad role model and must stop wearing the scout shirt they gave him,” Langbert said.

—  John Wright

DGLA hosts rally for safe schools in Oak Cliff

About 50 people gathered around a pavilion in Lake Cliff Park in Dallas on Friday evening for a safe schools rally organized by the Dallas Gay and Lesbian Alliance.

The crowd, which included several local TV news crews and about a dozen youth, listened as a series of speakers talked about what can be done to stop bullying, mentor children and quell the national gay teen suicide crisis.

Jesse Garcia, president of Dallas’ gay LULAC council, choked up as he recounted his own struggle to overcome bullying.

“We’re here for you,” Garcia said. “We care about you. You are our children. Don’t give up.”

Larry Duncan, president of Dallas County Schools, which provides transportation and other services for local school districts, told the crowd it was unfortunate Friday’s rally was even necessary.

“It isn’t about why we’re here, it’s about why the other people in our city and county aren’t here,” Duncan said. “The fact that we have to be here is a shame.”

State Rep. Roberto Alonzo, D-Dallas, vowed to push safe schools legislation that includes LGBT youth in next year’s legislative session.

Dallas City Councilwoman Delia Jasso said she’ll encourage the Dallas Independent School District to add sexual orientation and gender identity to a proposed new anti-bullying policy the district is considering.

“Just know you are not alone,” Jasso said. “There are lots of us on the City Council, myself included, who are here to help you. We cannot afford to lose any more teens to suicide.”

As currently written, DISD’s proposed new anti-bullying policy doesn’t include specific protections for LGBT youth. But Lee Taft, associate executive director at Resource Center Dallas, said DISD’s board of trustees agreed to delay discussion of the new policy this week in response to a request from his organization.

Taft, who lost his partner to suicide in the 1980s, said the community must focus on prevention instead of “post-vention.” He also said the media needs to strike a balance to avoid glamorizing suicide and fueling a copycat phenomenon.

“Let’s make sure that we don’t make martyrs and don’t empower bullies,” Taft said.

Patti Fink, president of DGLA, said the bullying children endure in school wouldn’t be tolerated in any other part of society, including the workplace or even people’s own neighborhoods.

“It’s a travesty that our children are experiencing brutality in our schools every day that prevents them from learning,” Fink said, issuing a call to action. “This is the time, this is the date, this is the energy we need to go forward.”

—  John Wright

MESSAGING FAIL: Tarrant Pride attendee tells Channel 5 that being gay is a choice

It’s good to see local TV news stations covering the Tarrant County Gay Pride Parade. But it’s unfortunate that NBCDFW.com posted this quote from an attendee on its website:

“I think whatever a person’s choice is, is their choice. I’m not out here to judge nobody, but I’m out here to standup and help be a part of that voice,” said one of the attendees.

If you watch the station’s video from the parade above, you’ll notice that whoever is responsible for the quote doesn’t appear anywhere in it. And who knows, maybe a homophobic intern at the station just decided to make an editorial statement. Let’s hope so, because it’s difficult enough fighting off the “gay is a choice” attacks from right-wingers. The last thing we need is be hearing it from within our own community.

—  John Wright