Emmer concedes; Target doesn’t

Target Retail StoreRepublican Tom Emmer finally conceded defeat to Democrat Mark Dayton in the Minnesota governor’s race. Although behind by 9,000 votes, the homophobic Emmer still thought he should have won.

The race gained national attention when Target and Best Buy made substantial donations to a PAC that supported Emmer. Although they claimed they supported Emmer for his position on lower taxes, LGBT groups jumped on the candidate’s extreme anti-gay views. He called one person who called for death to gays “a nice guy,” for example.

Target has refused to budge on its position, however. The Human Rights Campaign spoke to representatives of the company over the summer to encourage them to make equal donations to LGBT groups. Negotiations broke down and the company has not responded or supported LGBT groups in any significant way since then.

HRC’s rating of Target in the Corporate Equality Index was lowered from 100 percent to 85 percent in the latest listing.

—  David Taffet

LGBTs have a choice to vote Republican

The midterm election cycle presents many options for gays and lesbians all across the country: whether to pull the lever for a party that claims to stand for equality while defending “don’t ask, don’t tell” in court, a party which chooses sweeping healthcare mandates over achieving tax equity for domestic partners, and a party which failed to even bring up employment non-discrimination for a vote — or voters can choose a party that stands for lower taxes, a stronger national defense and fiscal policies that will stimulate small business and put Americans back to work.

This is a strange dynamic for many gays and lesbians, as 2008 was supposed to send a “fierce advocate” to the White House, end DADT and rapidly pass legislation ensuring equal protection under the law.

Instead, what voters got was a Democratic National Committee chairman who directed Maine voters to help out with elections in New Jersey, rather than oppose a ballot referendum on marriage equality; a White House senior advisor who labeled being gay as a “lifestyle choice” and an administration that believes DADT is constitutional and worth zealously defending in court.

Considering this sub-par record of Democratic achievement, it is time for gay and lesbian Americans to re-examine why they vote so often for candidates who fail to deliver solutions to the issues challenging their community.

As is the case for so many Americans right now, gays and lesbians should be looking for candidates supporting a legislative agenda focused on creating jobs, lowering taxes, halting runaway government spending and reducing an incomprehensible national debt.

After four years of liberal majorities in Congress, which they have used to vastly increase government’s role in the market and impose new burdens and uncertainty on America’s business owners, expecting Democrats to do an about-face and encourage any kind of economic opportunity is an exercise in futility. Whatever your sexual orientation, this economy hurts us all. It is time for a change.

R. Clarke Cooper is executive director of Log Cabin Republicans. E-mail him at rccooper@logcabin.org.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition October 29, 2010

—  Kevin Thomas

Real(ity) estate • Defining Homes

A Dallas couple’s adventure in house selling becomes an episode of HGTV’s ‘My First Sale’

By Arnold Wayne Jones

Keith Yonick, left, turned Dallas couple Troy and Cindy Hughes on to the idea of being on TV. But their youngest child, opposite, might steal every scene.

Although they live cosmopolitan lives — she’s a lawyer; he works for FM 105.3 with Chris Jagger — and count many gay neighbors in their gate East Dallas community among their friends, Cindy and Troy Hughes both grew up in small towns and craved the pace and benefits of the suburbs: lower taxes, good schools, safe streets. With a 4-year-old and a new baby, they figured next year would be a good time to look for a new home.

But the house-hunting started earlier than they expected. And more dramatically.

The Hugheses got a call from their real estate agent, Keith Yonick, with a proposition: Would they be interested in trying to sell their house now and have their experience filmed for the HGTV series My First Sale?

“When Keith called us and told us about the show, we went for it,” Cindy says.

“I think it’s great they chose Dallas for the show,” Yonick says. “I asked them why and they said because the houses are so different — they could film a townhouse in the city and a farmhouse in Forney or a suburban house.”

Yonick submitted four applications, and the network jumped at following the Hugheses. Still, it wasn’t the couple’s first foray into a reality series.

When Troy worked with Kidd Kraddick, he was recruited to be the “bachelor” in a radio rip-off of The Bachelor TV series. He was just supposed to chronicle his dates with several dozen women and invite one to a gala event. The one he selected was Cindy; they married three years later.

Still, a radio date is one thing; having yourself photographed 24/7 during a stressful process — the first sale of your home — was more pressure. Cindy even knows that on one day of filming, she came across as bitchy. (She’s hoping they edit that out, but Troy has forgiven her in any event.)
“We never treated it like a reality show but as a way to document this part of our lives,” Cindy says. “It was like making a home video.”

Knowing that “most houses take a year or more to sell” — Yonick says 370 days on the market is not unusual — they expected the process to stretch on for months, just in time for the next school year. So they were astonished that their house sold so quickly. In less than two months, they had a buyer.

Even so, the sale caught them so by surprise that they hadn’t even decided for certain where they would move.

“Our friends have all moved on to their next chapters — they were moving to Frisco and Rockwall.  They were always saying to us, ‘You have to move to Frisco!’ But we started looking in Wylie.”

It isn’t as far as it may seem. Troy leaves for work at 3 a.m. for his radio show (“I share the road with cops, construction workers and drunks,” he says) and Cindy’s job in Arlington meant she had a hike anywhere east of I-35.

“We thought we would move to Rockwall, but Wylie reminds me of what McKinney looked like when I came here in 1999,” Troy says. “We get more for our money out there, and there’s still a mall within four miles.”

Rather than buying an old house or going with a foreclosed property, they decided to build. Since the house won’t actually be ready until after they close on their sale, they’ll have to rent back their current house for a month. But as far as hardships go in real estate, that’s one they can live with.
“We got really lucky,” Troy says.

The Hugheses close on their sale on Oct. 29; their episode of My First Sale will air in the spring.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition of Defining Homes Magazine October 8, 2010.

—  Michael Stephens