Coalition of national LGBT groups endorse boycott over Arizona's anti-immigration law

MegaMarch.blog

A coalition of LGBT groups signed a letter today endorsing a boycott of Arizona. They point out that Arizona’s Republican governor, Jan Brewer, eliminated partnership benefits for gay and lesbian state employees when she took office.

The letter was written by the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force.

This is a even more of an LGBT issue when immigration laws are applied unequally to straight and gay couples. For an article on the Mega March in May, Dallas Voice spoke to one gay man who was brought here by his parents when he was 5. His brother and sister have both married U.S. citizens, but since his relationship with his partner is not federally recognized, he remains illegal.

The Dallas-based Human Right Initiative deals with hundreds of cases of LGBT immigrants who cannot obtain legal status because they are in same-sex relationships. An opposite-sex married couple would not have those immigration problems.

The full text of NGLTF’s letter is after jump.

—  David Taffet

WATCH: Immigrant Punk video splices footage from live show in Denton, MegaMarch in Dallas

A few weeks ago, I wrote about Denton’s Immigrant Punk, the music moniker of Rocio Aranda. She fuses folk and hip-hop and social messages in her tunes. She came to Texas with her family from Mexico and, with national focus on immigration reform, not to mention what’s happening in Arizona, it’s easy to figure this is something that speaks to her.

Here, she took footage of her last show at Cool Beans in Denton performing “Shape of Hope” and mashed it up with footage from the recent MegaMarch that took place in Dallas. The video is “dedicated to the immigrant in all of us.”

Immigrant Punk is next slated to perform in Florida at St. Pete Pride, St. Petersburg’s Pride Festival, on June 26.

—  Rich Lopez

2 Arizona cities vote to sue state over new anti-immigration law; others begin boycotts

May 1 Mega March in Dallas
May 1 Mega March in Dallas

The city councils of two Arizona cities voted to sue the state over its new immigration law on Tuesday. Tucson and Flagstaff are both concerned over the impact on tourism and the cost of enforcement.

Participation in Saturday’s Mega March in Dallas and in other marches across the country was fueled by opposition to the new law, which would require law enforcement officials to question people about their immigration status if they’re suspected of being in the country illegally.

Gay groups that participated in the Dallas march support comprehensive federal immigration reform that includes equality for LGBT immigrants.

Four lawsuits had already been filed against the law. A police officer from Tucson and one from Phoenix each have sued on their own behalf and not on behalf of their departments. The National Coalition of Latino Clergy and Christian Leaders, and a Washington-based researcher who plans to visit Arizona have also sued the state.

According to the Arizona Daily Star, Tucson Mayor Bob Walkup “said the law is based on a misguided notion illegal immigrants are bad for the area’s quality of life and economy. ‘Frankly, I don’t believe that’s true,’ Walkup said.”

In Texas, El Paso is the first city to officially react to the law.

The El Paso Times reports that city workers were instructed to avoid travel to Arizona until the law is repealed. Only one city council member voted against the boycott.

The American Immigration Lawyers Association has already canceled their fall convention that was scheduled to be held in September in Scottsdale.

The law won’t take effect until July . More coverage in Friday’s Dallas Voice.

—  David Taffet

The gays go to the Mega March

Staff writer David Taffet shot these photos Saturday featuring some of the LGBT folks who participated in the Mega March for Immigration Reform in downtown Dallas. He’ll have a full story on gays and immigration in Friday’s Voice.

The LGBT groups that participated in the Mega March that are in the video include Rainbow LULAC, Equality March Texas and Queer Liberaction Denton.

The video begins at the Meyerson Symphony Center where the LGBT marchers gathered. They joined the main march from Cathedral Guadalupe on Ross Avenue to Dallas City Hall.The march ended with speakers and the playing of “America the Beautiful” by lesbian writer Katharine Lee Bates.

Si se puede!

—  John Wright

Mega March includes LGBT groups

The Mega March for immigration reform attracted tens of thousands of people to downtown Dallas today.

LGBT groups met at the Morton Meyerson Symphony Center, one block from the main staging area on Ross Avenue. The march was scheduled for 1 p.m. but didn’t step off until 1:30.

In this short video, a gay contingent led by the LGBT LULAC Council is followed by a mass of people that filled at least 10 city blocks, curb to curb.

Also marching with Rainbow LULAC were members of QueerLiberAction Denton, Equality March Texas, GetEQUAL and Congregation Beth El Binah.

—  David Taffet

LGBT Mega Marchers to meet at Meyerson

2006 march
2006 Dallas immigration march

The Mega March is Saturday, May 1 in downtown Dallas.

The march supports immigration reform and had been planned long before Arizona passed its recent law, which is seen by most Hispanics as singling them out.

Jesse Garcia, president of Dallas’ LGBT chapter of the League of United Latin American Citizens, said those who’d like to march with the group should meet at the Meyerson Symphony Center at 12:30 p.m. The march begins at 1 p.m. and proceeds from the Guadalupe Cathedral on Ross Avenue to City Hall.

The march route will follow Pearl Street to Cesar Chavez Boulevard and then turn right on Young Street to City Hall. The march is expected to draw 100,000.

Right-wing KLIF talk show host Chris Krok is staging a counterprotest. That protest will meet at Akard and Young Streets and also starts at 1 p.m.

“We love you as a human being … but,” Krok said.

Where have we heard that before?

This week, five senators introduced comprehensive federal immigration reform legislation. The Uniting American Families Act is included. UAFA would allow same-sex partners of American citizens to remain in the country and gain citizenship just as heterosexual partners can.

To avoid massive traffic jams that are expected, take any DART rail line to the Pearl Street station.

—  David Taffet