ALLGO seeking LGBTQ people of color who’ve experienced violence to participate in study

ALLGO, a statewide organization for queer people of color, is looking for transgender, lesbian, bisexual, gay and queer people of color who have experienced violence in their lives to participate in confidential, two-hour small group discussions asaprt of an effort to “understand what violence people have encountered, witnessed, or been affected by; how they think these experiences have or have not changed them; and why people respond to their experiences of violence in the way they choose.”

The project is being conducted in partnership with the UT Community Engagement Center. Elvia Mendoza and David Glisch-Sanchez will conduct the small group discussions, scheduled to take place this Thursday from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the South Dallas Cultural Center, 3400 S. Fitzhugh Ave. in Dallas; and Thursday, Aug. 11, from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at a location in San Antonio to be announced later.

Anyone who identifies as a person of color and who also identifies as transgender, lesbian, gay, bisexual, queer, same-gender-loving and/or two-spirit, and who is a resident of Texas and at least 16 years old — and who has experienced some sort of violence in their life — is eligible to participate. Those who are interested in participating should contact Glisch-Sanchez by email at glisch.sanchez@gmail.com.

—  admin

In 6 months, 1,300 same-sex marriages in Argentina

Casa Rosada, or Red House, is the presidential palace where the Argentine marriage law was signed six months ago

In the first six months since the same-sex marriage law was signed, almost 1,300 couples have registered through the registry office. And the wedding rate is rising, according to the Argentine newspaper Clarin.

Clarin reports that on Jan. 15, the Argentina Federation for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Trans (FALGBT) had recorded 1,283 marriages in all provinces, although the distribution is not proportional, since most occur in large urban centers.

Recording the most marriages was the province of Buenos Aires (490) and the city of Buenos Aires (465). Other regions reporting include Santa Fe with 90, Cordova with 85 and Mendoza with 47. They say “sexual diversity in the more conservative provinces takes more time.”

Of the couples married, 70 percent are males who have been together 12-15 years. Possible explanations from FALGBT are because their lives are already consolidated and for health reasons they need to take care of each other. Younger couples prefer to try living together before marriage.

“Today there is no rush, because it is a right and may be exercised at any time,” says the head of FALGBT.

He said the first to marry were militants who brought the issue to the public. But now that the law has been in effect for awhile, many more are taking advantage and the rate of couples marrying is increasing.

Now, after marrying, a growing number of couples are beginning the process of adoption.

How has life changed for those who have married? One married woman says it is symbolic that the state recognizes her relationship and protects her at work and reassures her that if something happens to her, her wife has the tools to protect her. Another says it has to do with dignity, respect and having a sense of equality as well as the civil rights she can access through the law.

—  David Taffet