Thanespotting

I hate to have to say it, but I am so over Shakespeare. It was my college major, and theaters do it with the regularity of The Nutcracker at Christmastime, and frankly, I’m barded out.

Which is not to say I am directing my overall frustration specifically at Kitchen Dog Theater’s current production of Macbeth. At 100 un-intermissioned minutes, it’s a quick dart through the castles of Scotland — almost too quick. At heart, it’s a ghost story with witches and specters and lots of blood … only no blood here, and not a lot of mood. (The design is a convoluted modernization of urban guerrillas — Che Guevara meets Patty Hearst. Didn’t work.) But the problem is not really with the production, which kept my interest though never truly engaged me; the problem is doing it at all. Let’s declare a moratorium on iambic pentameter for two years. Even a great meal needs a palate cleanser.

— Arnold Wayne Jones

Through March 5. KitchenDogTheater.com

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition Feb. 11, 2011.

—  John Wright

BREAKING: Pentagon tells recruiters DADT is suspended, they must accept gay applicants

The Associated Press is reporting that Pentagon spokeswoman Cynthia Smith has announced that “top-level” guidance has been issued to recruiting commands telling them that the “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy prohibiting openly gay and lesbian people from serving in the military has been suspended, at least for now.

But recruiters have also been told to tell possible LGBT recruits that the moratorium could be re-instated at any time.

The move comes in the wake of U.S. District Judge Virginia Phillips’ ruling, in a case brought by the Log Cabin Republicans, that DADT is unconstitutional, and the injunction she issued last week ordering the military to halt enforcement of the ban.

The Department of Justice, which is defending the ban in court, has asked Phillips to delay enforcement of her injunction pending appeal, but Phillips said Monday, Oct. 18, that it is unlikely she’ll suspend the injunction. If she doesn’t, the DOJ is expected to ask an appellate court to do so.

—  admin